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30 review for Broetry Poetry for Dudes

  1. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    Broetry (poetry for dudes) walks that thin line between poetry and doggerel with a certain grace and a masculine sense of humor. In a way it reminds me of Charles Bukowski's poetry which probably says more about how little poetry I read than anything else. But is it art? You'll have to decide that but if it isn't, it comes close enough for me. Anyway it was interesting and entertaining which pretty much covers all the reasons that I read.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jack Rousseau

    Embarrassingly bad. One need only read the poem on the cover to know how bad it is. If not, the description confirms how bad it is. "As contemporary poets sing the glories of birds, birch trees, and menstruation..." "And menstruation"? Is this supposed to be funny? (That's a rhetorical question. I know it's supposed to be funny. Just like the rest of the book is supposed to be funny.) Personally, I don't find misogyny particularly funny. Why should the success of this book come at the expense of f Embarrassingly bad. One need only read the poem on the cover to know how bad it is. If not, the description confirms how bad it is. "As contemporary poets sing the glories of birds, birch trees, and menstruation..." "And menstruation"? Is this supposed to be funny? (That's a rhetorical question. I know it's supposed to be funny. Just like the rest of the book is supposed to be funny.) Personally, I don't find misogyny particularly funny. Why should the success of this book come at the expense of female poets? (Most of whom, I might add, have never written a poem about menstruation.) "Who can speak for Everyman? Who will articulate his love for Xbox 360, for Mama Celeste’s frozen pizza, for the cinematic oeuvre of Bruce Willis?..." If the "everyman" can be summarized by their love "for Xbox 360, for Mama Celeste's frozen pizza, for Bruce Willis, for Star Wars conventions, and frat parties", then I think we're overdue for a genocide or plague or natural disaster of some description. If not, perhaps we can take matters into our own hands with mandatory sterilization? After all, the problem could just as easily be treated by preventing the "everyman" from reproducing. I know the book is making fun of the "bro", of the "dude", of the "everyman". But at the same time it is celebrating their complacency, it is elevating their inanity, it is justifying and validating their pathetic existence. Reading BROETRY felt a bit like banging my head against a wall. In part because it was futile, and in part because I felt like I was doing permanent damage to some region of the brain. Leaving me with the impression that I would rather inflict harm to some other region of my body than read another another poem about chicken wings or hooking up. Readers who enjoyed BROETRY will likely read my review and think, "He has no sense of humour." On the contrary, if you find any humour in this rubbish I would sooner call into question your sense of humour. Not to mention your perspective on gender and sexuality.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kat

    what a HUGE bummer. first of all, let me acknowledge that i'm going to write an unnecessarily long review about this one because of my tendency to take things that don't matter WAY too seriously. ok first of all, i must say that i did get something out of this collection. i was starting to worry about "goodreads ratings inflation" given that i did not give a single one-star rating all of last year, but now i feel more affirmed in my belief that by this point in my life, i know what i like and i t what a HUGE bummer. first of all, let me acknowledge that i'm going to write an unnecessarily long review about this one because of my tendency to take things that don't matter WAY too seriously. ok first of all, i must say that i did get something out of this collection. i was starting to worry about "goodreads ratings inflation" given that i did not give a single one-star rating all of last year, but now i feel more affirmed in my belief that by this point in my life, i know what i like and i tend not to pick up books i won't like. that being said, i must defend the choice to pick up this one, which was more out of curiosity and wishful thinking than out of a real belief it was going to be good. but i really did hope it would prove a pleasant surprise, given its unnecessarily gendered premise! i'm all for exploring the lowbrow through highbrow forms. this collection is based on gimmick and schtick, which would be fine, were it not deeply offensive to me both in terms of content and (maybe to me?) more importantly, aesthetically speaking. let us begin first with the objectionability of its content: this collection features such charmers as "I'll Take 'Crazy Bitches' for $200, Alex" and "Pocahotness," and is just rife with a toxic hetero-masculine view of women. sorry to continue to just throw around the buzzword toxic masculinity, because i'm honestly so tired of people pointing it out when i think the focus should be figuring out where to go from this toxicity. but in this case, what other way is there to describe a collection that describes intimacy with women over the age of 60 as "fucking gross, man," or provides us with such sophisticated math equations as "tequila = girl - clothing." or even gives us pieces of wisdom like "it was actually a girl's fault, as most things tend to be." one gets the sense that the narrator's ideal woman is someone who has sex with him whenever he wants, cooks/cleans for him, but also leaves him alone to his video games and never complains or accuses him of cheating (even if he is). after a dismal first few poems, i had to vastly revise my expectations of what this collection was going to be, but even then, i STILL held out hope, since the table of contents clearly indicated that the poems would cover the life of a bro from high school to early career adulthood, and maybe, just maybe, the whole thing was supposed to be like a flowers for algernon kind of thing, except with maturity instead of intelligence. admittedly, while the poems do get less misogynistic as time goes on, and begin to be about other things besides the bitches who broke his heart/wouldn't sleep with him, the fundamentally gross attitude towards women persists to the very end. when women in these poems aren't busy being objectified and subjected to the male gaze, they are given a point of view only through italicized stereotypes of female shallowness, full of "OMG"s and nagging. also, like, what did i expect after the intro began with "Broetry originated centuries ago, high atop the mountains of feudal Japan, when a small sect of samurai monks decided they were tired of writing poems that were deep and meaningful." that was the first clue that this was all going to shit... ok there are other objectionable things, content-wise, but i am getting very tired of this section already. i think the above would be bad enough for some people to wholeheartedly categorize this collection as a pile of hot garbage, but can i just point out that despite bukowski's objectionable content, i still (embarrassingly) really enjoy reading him? like damn, i still have that line "shit: / drink without smoke is like / cock without / pussy" saved onto my computer. totally vulgar, but still kind of amazingly expressive? meanwhile, mcgackin here seems to be alternating between putting line breaks in unsophisticated ramblings on pop culture/comics and superheroes/bruce willis films, writing sexist haikus, and writing bad parodies of iconic poems ("The Road Unable to Be Taken Because I'm Trapped Behind a Line of Dudes in Stormtrooper Armor Who Feel the Need to Take Pictures with Every Girl They See Wearing a Slave Leia Outfit" or "O Captain! My Captain America!"). all of these just beg the question of why this book fucking needed to be published at all. beyond being egregiously sexist, having a cavalierly casual racism, they are just bad poems!!!!! so there is nothing redeeming about this collection!!!!!! i was so bummed because i want to believe in the concept of broetry that can work, but this was definitely not it. mcgackin claims in his introduction that this is "poetry for people who don't like poetry," but honestly i'm also sick and tired of people claiming poetry is dead and irrelevant because it is clearly not! i may not think much of the formal features of tumblr poetry (a category which definitively includes rupi kaur), but let's be honest--these poems are meaningful and read! it is dumb and condescending to think that this poetry collection was somehow needed as a cultural poultice to 'bros' because, in mcgackin's own words, "admit it, you could be more cultured; you just picked up a book called Broetry." but even if it were about getting a new demographic interested in poetry, could we have picked an avenue that didn't perpetuate the toxic attitudes we are working so hard to get rid of??? DAMN IT I AM SO MAD. the only glimmer of hope i have remaining is that this is just a great big joke, and that mcgackin is secretly laughing his way to the bank. which like, still, get rid of the gross attitudes towards women, and also, like, did he really actually make enough money on this book to justify how terrible it is...? like maybe there are a few tiny moments i appreciated, one of them being a poem so short that it didn't have time to demonstrate bad form and bad politics: WHY DO BUSES SMELL? The young girl asks her mother. I listen, because I want to know, too. ok i admit i did like that one! which is how you should know that i'm not just being an uncharitable buzzkill feminist here. i would end this review by saying i'm immediately returning this book to the library, but because it's an ebook, i'm actually going to hold onto it until it expires so as to hinder its circulation. have a nice day, all. thanks for reading, and may we all have the confidence and publishability of mediocre white men.

  4. 4 out of 5

    M.J. Ryder

    Broetry: a book of poetry, but for ‘bros’. Penned by ‘voice of the Everyman’ Brian McGackin, Broetry is an attempt to reinterpret what McGackin considers to be an effete, rapidly-shrinking form of literature with ‘little popularity’. It is an attempt to make poetry accessible to men, who according to McGackin, find poetry of little relevance in the modern-day world. Spurious assumptions aside (I will come to these later) the premise behind Broetry would seem to be quite a good one. Broetry takes u Broetry: a book of poetry, but for ‘bros’. Penned by ‘voice of the Everyman’ Brian McGackin, Broetry is an attempt to reinterpret what McGackin considers to be an effete, rapidly-shrinking form of literature with ‘little popularity’. It is an attempt to make poetry accessible to men, who according to McGackin, find poetry of little relevance in the modern-day world. Spurious assumptions aside (I will come to these later) the premise behind Broetry would seem to be quite a good one. Broetry takes us on a free verse journey through the life of a ‘typical’ young man as we follow ‘The Bro’ through high school, to university and later to unemployment and the protagonist’s ‘Quarter-Life Crisis’. As an observer of human life, McGackin takes us to places most poetry simply doesn’t take us, with poems ranging from ‘Ode to That Girl I Dated for, Like, a Month Sophomore Year’ to ‘Final Final Fantasy’, ‘The Clown Outside the Department Store’ and ‘Morning Sex’. The titles alone give a good impression of what Broetry is all about and it’s fair to say you will either ‘get it’, or you simply won’t. So we come to the question then, is the book any good? The answer, I’m afraid, is not all that clear-cut. For a start, let me describe myself to you. I am, in every sense of the word, the key demographic this book is aimed at. I’m 20-something, I have no money, I’m in massive debt, I like girls, and I like the odd drink at the weekend. So why then, does Broetry leave me feeling so, well, empty? I don’t think there was a single point during my time spent reading the collection that I thought ‘oh yeah’ or found myself thinking about a particular poem after the event. Having given the problem particular thought, I have come to the conclusion that the problems with Broetry are threefold. Firstly, as I alluded to in my opening remarks, Broetry makes a number of sweeping, and in some instances, quite offensive assumptions. Of course there is an element of ‘tongue in cheek’ with the whole ‘Poetry for Dudes’ tagline, but to assume that all men are dumb beasts driven only by money, sex and alcohol is quite plainly wrong. This tacit assumption that we (men) are all simpletons incapable of appreciating poetry, and then to make the bold claim that poetry in itself is both effete and of ‘little popularity’, offends me both as a man, and as a literary critic. This point links with the second tier of my complaints about Broetry and that is simply, that I don’t think this work, or indeed this ‘form’ of poetry has a future for McGackin. At its very core, the work is flawed. Ask yourself: why do you read poetry, and more importantly, why do you read a certain poet? A few moments’ thought on the subject should tell you that you read a poet because of their voice; because of the unique perspective they offer; perhaps even because they offer something different to other poets. Clearly at this moment in time, McGackin ticks the third of these three points, but for how long? He has set himself up as the voice of the ‘Everyman’ and in so doing exposes himself to the criticism that essentially anyone with a reasonable grasp of English can do what he is doing. Which brings us to the final problem I have with Broetry, and that is, simply, that I’m not sure the poems are any good. Obviously poetry is a subjective art-form, and there are doubtless thousands out there who will get some sort of pleasure from the collection, but for me, the poems just don’t do it. The fact they are for the most part free verse certainly doesn’t help. Take the following for example, an extract from ‘Final Final Fantasy’ (p. 49): I will not spend one hundred and thirteen hours of my life on a video game ever again. I will not rationalize, claiming that it is somehow “research” for my future career as a comic book writer. I will not allow myself to be … As a writer in the games industry, it’s fair to say I know a fair few people who have probably thought, or even said a similar such thing on social media. But to call it poetry? I’m sorry, but from where I’m standing, that’s not the work of a wordsmith; that’s the word of someone doodling on the back of their folder in a lecture hall. Maybe I’m missing something, but the more I think about it, the more I think I’m right. Quirk Books have taken a risk with Broetry — of that I am in no doubt. I am also in no doubt that the risk will pay off in the short term while Broetry remains a novelty. Long term however, I don’t see the Broetry phenomenon taking off. Clearly I’m not a Bro after all… To read more of my reviews, please visit my website, www.mjryder.net

  5. 4 out of 5

    Whitney

    I can see how this book is clever, and it's certainly an interesting idea (Broetry = poetry for dudes). But I could not keep reading a book that constantly refers to women as "bitches." Why do some guys think that if a girl breaks up with you she's automatically a bitch? Also I just can't relate to all the beer-centric poems.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Angela Holtz

    http://lilacwolfandstuff.blogspot.com... The cover is so simplistic, you might miss it. No I like it, it's white, the title is the only color. On the front cover is a Broem and also on the back. So, how is the poetry? What do I look like, a Rhodes scholar? It's fun, all of it is in good fun. I'm not a guy, and some references I didn't totally understand, but I laughed a lot! He writes about past girlfriends, relationships, magic the game, the incredible debt of college and the inevitability of givi http://lilacwolfandstuff.blogspot.com... The cover is so simplistic, you might miss it. No I like it, it's white, the title is the only color. On the front cover is a Broem and also on the back. So, how is the poetry? What do I look like, a Rhodes scholar? It's fun, all of it is in good fun. I'm not a guy, and some references I didn't totally understand, but I laughed a lot! He writes about past girlfriends, relationships, magic the game, the incredible debt of college and the inevitability of giving up on LA and moving back home. For a guy who doesn't open up, it's pretty deep. Not a lot of feelings outright, but lots hidden within the lines. Isn't that good poetry? Ok, I'm going to leave you with my favorite ending to one of the poems called "Why You Should Listen to Classical Music" on page 117. Classical music. It makes you smarter. And admit it, you could be more cultured; you just picked up a book called Broetry Some were difficult to read, but in general I fully enjoyed myself.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Thom Dunn

    BROETRY delivers everything it promises with maximum entertainment value. It's a so-stupid-it's-brilliant high concept that actually works incredibly well. The subject matter might be goofy, the concept might sound gimmicky, but McGackin's poetry stands out as pitch-perfect writing that constantly outshines itself.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Joanne

    I don't normally review poetry on this blog, and I try to keep it strictly YA, but when I heard about this book, I knew I had to review it. Poetry for the modern guy? It sounded hilarious! And as it starts through the teen years, I figured I could review it here. So I read it. And I loved it! There are certain types of poetry that I really enjoy, but I'm the type of person who normally needs a translation to understand what is going on, which is half the reason Broetry appeals to me - poetry I ca I don't normally review poetry on this blog, and I try to keep it strictly YA, but when I heard about this book, I knew I had to review it. Poetry for the modern guy? It sounded hilarious! And as it starts through the teen years, I figured I could review it here. So I read it. And I loved it! There are certain types of poetry that I really enjoy, but I'm the type of person who normally needs a translation to understand what is going on, which is half the reason Broetry appeals to me - poetry I can actually understand! The other reason, it's for the modern day guy, and sometimes I swear I shoul have been born a boy, because guy humour is my humour! So not only could I understand the poetry, it really made me laugh too! I'm not a poetry buff - as I've said, I have trouble understanding poetry - so I can't really comment on how well most of these poems are written. They could be really good, they could be really bad. This actually doesn't matter to me; I really enjoyed what I was reading, so does it really matter if it was brilliantly written? To some, maybe, but this isn't something I can really comment on. Sorry. However, there are two poems I absolutely need to mention. The first is Haikougar, which is what it says; a series of haiku poems - poems that are three lines long, where the first line is a total of five syllable, the second line a total of seven, and the third a total of five again - about cougars. As a teenager, I dabbled in writing some really awful poetry, and the one thing I hated - yet thought was a brilliant in other poems - was structure. I couldn't do it. I've never been able to. Writing about something with rules on how it has to be written just never worked for me. Haiku poetry is one I find awesome, and Haikougar is just so funny! Getting poem to work, make sense, and also be really funny within those rules is just awesome! The other poem is Not Another Teen Movie. It tells the story of a teen relationship - using just movie titles. It is complete genius! I absolutely loved it! It's just so clever! So good, that I have to share the beginngin with you. Never Been Kissed. Waiting.... Les Misérables. The Opposite of Sex. Thirteen. Chain Reaction. One Fine Day. The Arrival. Savior. The Girl Next Door. She's All That. Lovely & Amazing. The Object of My Affection. Mission: Impossible. Fools Rush In. Whatever It Takes. Brilliant, huh? To find out if he actually gets anywhere with the girl, you'll just have to read the book! There were some problems though. It's written by an American author, so there are some things in referred to that, as a Brit, I just didn't get. I'll Take "Crazy Bitches" for $200, Alex. That poem went right over my head. There are other things mentioned that I think are guy things I just didn't get. So sometimes I was a little lost, but most of the time, I was smiling and laughing. Broetry is a really awesome book! I absolutely loved it, and I look forward to reading what McGacking releases next. The only thing I would say is I'd probably recommend it for older teens and adults. Some topics may not appeal to the younger teen. Once Upon a Bookcase - YA book blog.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    Just looking at the cover makes me laugh. And in a good way, I'm not mocking the book or anything. Broetry is funny, really funny. Some of the poems are really fabulous. Like, for instance, there's this poem titled, 'Ode to Taylor Swift'. It's about how the poet is in love with her, and how she's an angel, and it could have been very creepy, but the author makes it funny. And he quotes her lyrics, which I thought was hilarious. Broetry is poetry in the mind of a guy. It's poems about drinking, ha Just looking at the cover makes me laugh. And in a good way, I'm not mocking the book or anything. Broetry is funny, really funny. Some of the poems are really fabulous. Like, for instance, there's this poem titled, 'Ode to Taylor Swift'. It's about how the poet is in love with her, and how she's an angel, and it could have been very creepy, but the author makes it funny. And he quotes her lyrics, which I thought was hilarious. Broetry is poetry in the mind of a guy. It's poems about drinking, having one-night stands, girlfriends, weird things you do for girlfriends, college, and growing up, something McGackin has not done. That makes the book better, because it's not a grown man with kids and stuff writing about the thoughts of a bachelor, it's an actual kid who went through these things, and is writing from experience. Not all poems are funny and loose, though. There's this poem called, 'And You'll Be Way Cooler in College', that talks about hurting and nobody giving you a chance. And if they did give you a chance, you'd be able to shine. That poem hit home and it got some deep thinking, but then I saw the picture accompanying it, and thought, Is this supposed to be deep? Because the picture is of an older man giving a younger boy a wedgie. What I got from it is that high school and all these years suck, and when you get to college, you can be yourself, and you're not under the light of your parents, and the people your grew up with. The index is beautiful. I thought it was a normal index, like you know, it says a word, and where that word is located in the book. There's some things like that, but the other words and references are hilarious. For instance, it says Answer, 42. And that's a reference to Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy because 42 is the answer to everything. And then he writes Eon -Vapor, 134 -Esp, 196 -Leaf, 470 And there are a bunch more. These are all the evolutions of Eevee. Yes, the Pokemon. It evolves into Vaporeon, Espeon, Leafeon, and about three or four more. But it's funny. And those numbers aren't page numbers, it's what number Pokemon they are. And there is soo much more like that. Overall, this book is beautiful. It's a short, quick read (115 pages) and it's funny. And it makes a lot of Harry Potter references. And the author loves Emma Watson. He even thanked God for her. McGackin has a fan in me.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Clarke-Smith

    I am not the target for this book, but I couldn't help but pick it up. The cover reads: I have finished the beer that was in the icebox and which you were probably saving for Friday Forgive me this girl came over so sweet and so hot Doesn't that make you smile? (And remember your 20s...) The target audience for this book is males somewhere between mid 20s and 30 somethings. There are poems about women, drinking, love, trying to find a job and pop culture. I found it pretty hilarious and really entertaining I am not the target for this book, but I couldn't help but pick it up. The cover reads: I have finished the beer that was in the icebox and which you were probably saving for Friday Forgive me this girl came over so sweet and so hot Doesn't that make you smile? (And remember your 20s...) The target audience for this book is males somewhere between mid 20s and 30 somethings. There are poems about women, drinking, love, trying to find a job and pop culture. I found it pretty hilarious and really entertaining. Broetry is a look into the psyche of the average male in this age range. Its poems about coming into adulthood, trying to figure things out, and odes to "cool" things...as a woman in the same age range married to a man going through similar things, I couldn't help but appreciate it. It would make a good gift for those guys who can appreciate this stuff.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Why read: Received for review What impressed me: I'm no poetry fan, but I could get through this book easily and managed to be mildly entertained for the most part. What disappointed me: The novelty of McGackin's voice wears off about four poems in. If feels like it's supposed to be really funny, but completely misses the mark landing nearer unusual. Broetry proves poetry can be written for the masses, but it failed to strike a chord in me. Recommended: Not really. It's only appeal is in its quirki Why read: Received for review What impressed me: I'm no poetry fan, but I could get through this book easily and managed to be mildly entertained for the most part. What disappointed me: The novelty of McGackin's voice wears off about four poems in. If feels like it's supposed to be really funny, but completely misses the mark landing nearer unusual. Broetry proves poetry can be written for the masses, but it failed to strike a chord in me. Recommended: Not really. It's only appeal is in its quirkiness.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Krista (CubicleBlindness Reviews)

    Well this one just didn't fit me at all. I only liked two of the poems included in this book. "And You'll be Way Cooler in College" and "Part-Time Job Search" I felt they actually had a message to them that I could connect with and make some sense of. I can see how this book would appeal to men as it is mostly full of dating, drinking and sex poems. I think I was hoping to find more of an insight to a guy's brain but as usual lost interest very fast. I am going to pass this one on to friends and Well this one just didn't fit me at all. I only liked two of the poems included in this book. "And You'll be Way Cooler in College" and "Part-Time Job Search" I felt they actually had a message to them that I could connect with and make some sense of. I can see how this book would appeal to men as it is mostly full of dating, drinking and sex poems. I think I was hoping to find more of an insight to a guy's brain but as usual lost interest very fast. I am going to pass this one on to friends and hope it finds a good home.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Rosenberger

    When I saw that the cover parodied good old William Carlos Williams, I thought it was a good sign. When I opened it up to find the first page was an homage to "Lying in a Hammock" that managed to stay true to the great bait-and-switch ending of the original, I got super excited. Unfortunately, Broetry got a lot more uneven from there, but thanks to several inspired moments, it ended up being a decently funny little book. Good for college kids, especially English majors.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jane

    I borrowed this book as a joke and while some of it was what I expected some of it was really poignant and some of it made me sad and some of it made me laugh and some of it was shockingly well done. I don't even care that I probably looked like a total douche while reading it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Winnifred

    Goodreads giveaway. LOL. Although I'm not a "dude", I actually understand some of this stuff!! loved the references to harry potter :) and the poem about taylor swift. this guy is awesome!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    Sure its a little gimicky, but its fun and still true to forms.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Zoraida

    A wonderfully witty journey of adolescence to modern (sort of) manhood.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Nelson Holmes

    Heavy profanity, misogyny, objectification, and disagreeable perspectives exemplify this, I guess publication is appropriate. While it is instructive to learn more about an idea, perspective, or population through the thing's own words I'm not sure this is the best place to start.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lyndsi

    Not for me but I can see why it is funny.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Funny. A bit juvenile in the humor.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Newman

    This guy is a genius. Makes poetry actually fun to read and he can put together a great lyric.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Noah Barnett

    Picked it up for a dollar on humble bundle. Easy read. I liked the storm trooper poem, and the ones about Bruce Willis.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Raya

    If, say, I was the average college frat boy (I believe beer-binging, video gaming, girls, and sex go hand-in-hand with common frat-boy associations)—or even the 'common' dude or dudette—I might be more apt to relate to broetry. Or, in the very least, strangle my bro-bias long enough for it to temporarily check out, long enough for me to yank my brain out of snobville, and thus surrender what I appreciate about "regular poetry" (McGackin's phrase, not mine). I questioned if I am one of those peop If, say, I was the average college frat boy (I believe beer-binging, video gaming, girls, and sex go hand-in-hand with common frat-boy associations)—or even the 'common' dude or dudette—I might be more apt to relate to broetry. Or, in the very least, strangle my bro-bias long enough for it to temporarily check out, long enough for me to yank my brain out of snobville, and thus surrender what I appreciate about "regular poetry" (McGackin's phrase, not mine). I questioned if I am one of those people: people who have their heads shoved so deep in book pages and Fringe plot twists that when the time comes to socialize with society's norm, they emerge as awkward creatures who think the status bro-quo is far too idiotic and far less interesting than their natural habitat. Or, perhaps, I am a little too disapproving of the typical bro (I did admit to harboring a bias, okay). Broetry is poetry that's right for you. Broetry is a literary chili cheeseburger. I know, but I don't like chili cheeseburgers—not even the literary kind. This has been a failed persuasion, McGackin, so go ahead: groan. What this boils down to, really, is that I am not part of the intended target audience. If this was instead titled, "I'm sorry I can't hang out this weekend, but I have a busy schedule of doing nothing by myself: poems for the common introvert loner" or "Poems about Picard, his Enterprise, & other things to make you nerdgasm," I might grow feelings of a deep, real love. I'd feel a connection between me and the book, but because I have little in common with Broetry's content... Well, the hook is there yet no bait to draw me in, put simply. However. Broetry is—even after all I have said, you best believe it—amusing. To pull a few examples from the book directly: and I might not be an adult per se, but I'm sure I'll make it there someday. Theoretically. —Kids Today You're only four years younger than me, but at 2 a.m. when I'm online, your website makes me feel like a creep —Ode to Taylor Swift 1 weekend visiting your cousin's state school + 1 girl whose name you can't remember + 1 one-night stand = 1 case of herpes —College + Love - Love = College There are, of course, other parts that pried my lips into a smile, such as a few spotted references/parodies of other (serious) literary works, the notion of Patrick Stewart ruling the word (via Enterprise), Arizona tea, frozen pizza, how every region on planet Earth is a disaster zone so you best liken to the idea of dying ("unless you find a way to escape / to somewhere less deadly, though it's fairly / safe to assume you've got a good chance of / dying there, too"). I will not readily buy into that it's-so-dumb-it's-genius brouhaha, but Broetry may work for you when the need to read lighter material strikes. Broetry is poetry that may (not) be right for you. Broetry is a literary chili cheeseburger. So: are you hungry? You won't know if you like it until you try it.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mishel Forte

    My Rating: 4.5/5 stars! I admit I can't quite remember the poetry lessons I had in school...and I'm definitely not a connoisseur in poetry (or literature, or writing, or anything actually...). I don't remember all the different type of poems or the technicalities of creative writing so take what you will from my review. Broetry is basically for the men in the world who don't like poetry... being a female who sometimes enjoyed (when I could understand it), if not always appreciated, poetry didn't My Rating: 4.5/5 stars! I admit I can't quite remember the poetry lessons I had in school...and I'm definitely not a connoisseur in poetry (or literature, or writing, or anything actually...). I don't remember all the different type of poems or the technicalities of creative writing so take what you will from my review. Broetry is basically for the men in the world who don't like poetry... being a female who sometimes enjoyed (when I could understand it), if not always appreciated, poetry didn't deter me from enjoying the collection. From a person who enjoys all forms of humor, be it crude and vulgar to cute and corny, I found Broetry to be full of funny moments ranging from laugh-out-loud to indiscreet smiles. I even recognized some of the poetic forms McGackin used and found them clever and interesting. And I may not be able to relate to everything in the poems I still found them funny as hell! As I was reading through the short collection of poems I found myself marking pages of my favorites and wanting to share them with everyone. Some of them include: *Not Another Teen Movie - composed of movie titles that are arrayed in a pretty clever relationship timeline *I'll Take "Crazy Bitches" for $200, Alex - a play on Jeopardy and ex-girlfriends *Whorecrux - a very clever usage of a Harry Potter term in reference to 7 "important" ex-girlfriends *Pocahotness - about crushing on animated characters *Yes, I Cheated on You - Being a woman I wasn't offended by this poem because I was that girl in some of my relationships...It was interesting to see a guy's perspective on the uneasy subject abou fidelity. This one is also an example of a specific type of poem, I just don't know which kind lol *(American) Ninja Warrior - I'm having a hard time really explaining what this one was about...it could be a dual personality thing going on or different point of views arguing...its funny though! The poems were also broken up into parts, or time periods, of a person (or man's) life. It started with high school, through college graduation, to "real life" with a "quarter-life" crisis thrown in for fun! The subject of the poems varied, sometimes wildly, and I just had a blast reading them all. Broetry is a keeper in my opinion. It may not be the best collection of poems but its a book that I know will bring a smile to my face when I need it. It's clever, funny, cute, and just plain fun! And yes, it can be educational because it does show some of different examples of poetic writing. I also think it will accomplish its goal and hit home with its target audience: the men in the world who could care less about the poetry they had to read in school...this may be the book to get them =)

  25. 4 out of 5

    Juliet Wilson

    'As contemporary poets sing the glories of birds, birch trees, and menstruation, regular guys are left scratching their heads. Who can speak for Everyman? Who will articulate his love for Xbox 360, fo Mama Celeste's frozen pizza, for the cinematic oeuvre of Bruce Willis?' So begins the introduction to Broetry, a book that claims to offer poetry for dudes who don't like poetry. So there's an instant problem for me here, I'm not a dude and I love poetry. So for this review, I used the services of C 'As contemporary poets sing the glories of birds, birch trees, and menstruation, regular guys are left scratching their heads. Who can speak for Everyman? Who will articulate his love for Xbox 360, fo Mama Celeste's frozen pizza, for the cinematic oeuvre of Bruce Willis?' So begins the introduction to Broetry, a book that claims to offer poetry for dudes who don't like poetry. So there's an instant problem for me here, I'm not a dude and I love poetry. So for this review, I used the services of Crafty Green Boyfriend, who doesn't like poetry (unless I wrote it!), though he's not a Bruce Willis fan and he does like birds and birch trees, so he's not perfect for this purpose, but he's the only guy I know who I can randomly read poetry to, so he'll have to do. Crafty Green Boyfriend could relate to many of the poems, including Final Final Fantasy (though his weakness is computer games rather than video games per se) and When Patrick Stewart Rules the World (actually I think Crafty Green Boyfriend for a while thought Patrick Stewart did rule the world). He felt that The Road Unable to be Taken Because I'm Trapped Behind a Line of Dudes in Stormtrooper Armor Who Feel the Need to Take Pictures with Every Girl They See Wearing a Slave Leia Outfit was such a good title it didn't need a poem. Being a biologist, but not a fan of peanut butter in any form, Crafty Green Boyfriend was very entertained by On the Origin of Reese's a poem in 14 parts on the natural selection and development of peanut butter cups. He was also totally entertained by Modern Day Heroics, in which the narrator uses his skills at removing spiders from a room to win a woman (even though I'm not scared of spiders!). I also enjoyed the poems here, they are engaging and clever and written on topics that most people (specially dudes) can relate to. Plus there's a good, self deprecating sense of humour in here: Classical music. It makes you smarter. And admit it, you could be more cultured; you just picked up a book called Broetry. from Why You Should Listen to Classical Music So yeah, pick this book up and give it to the men in your life who don't like poetry. Or even those who do.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lori

    Read 8/ 25/11 - 8/27/11 3 Stars - Recommended to readers familiar with genre Pgs: 121 Welcome to a whole new world of poetry, as told from the "man's man" perspective. Say so long to the flowery, romantic, whimsically girly prose you've become accustomed to! Brian McGackin's laying down brand new rhymes that speak to the heart of all of us... in terms we can all relate to. With a manly flair, Brian pulls much of the content for his broems from past experiences - spelling out his dating horror storie Read 8/ 25/11 - 8/27/11 3 Stars - Recommended to readers familiar with genre Pgs: 121 Welcome to a whole new world of poetry, as told from the "man's man" perspective. Say so long to the flowery, romantic, whimsically girly prose you've become accustomed to! Brian McGackin's laying down brand new rhymes that speak to the heart of all of us... in terms we can all relate to. With a manly flair, Brian pulls much of the content for his broems from past experiences - spelling out his dating horror stories, addiction to video games and beer, and unhealthy obsession for Taylor Swift for us in neat, concise lines that drive straight through to the heart of it all. Poking fun at the format, Brian pretends he is a guest on Jeopardy in his broem "I'll take Crazy Bitches for $200, Alex", where he answers questions like... "Crazy Bitches for $400. Usually referred to as "zero," "nonexistent," or "the same as that of Hell freezing over," her family still calls it "pretty good." What are the odds of us getting back together? Correct. " Sweetly demonstrating his sensitive side in "Whorecrux", he lists out all the girls he's dated over the years that have broken his heart, beginning with the red head in first grade who put him off Snack Packs and ginger hair for the rest of his life. "Modern-Day Heroics" finds him pondering the act of killing a spider for a sex reward, though he ends up feeling extremely guilty over the dead arachnid. I don't know why, but I had fully anticipated opening this book up and finding myself bombarded with a collection of pensive poems about farting, and scratching, and masturbating. And to be honest, I am a bit disappointed that I didn't come across much of that. What the hell does that say about me?!! My personal perversions aside, this book is a must buy for the man in your life. As a stocking stuffer, birthday gift, anniversary present... you can't go wrong with a little Broetry. Many thanks to Eric over at Quirk Books for making this review copy available to me. I look forward to reading more of their catalog in the future.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    Brilliant. That's the best word I can come up with to describe Broetry. I majored in creative writing in college, and my emphasis was on poetry. I love Ted Kooser, Yusef Komunyakaa, Robert Frost, Poe, Diane Thiel, and, of course, Jimmy Santiago Baca (it would almost be a crime not to look him, considering he's also from New Mexico). I have a huge poetry anthology that has hundreds of sticky notes marking my favorite poems. I have books by my favorite poets that also have sticky notes marking my f Brilliant. That's the best word I can come up with to describe Broetry. I majored in creative writing in college, and my emphasis was on poetry. I love Ted Kooser, Yusef Komunyakaa, Robert Frost, Poe, Diane Thiel, and, of course, Jimmy Santiago Baca (it would almost be a crime not to look him, considering he's also from New Mexico). I have a huge poetry anthology that has hundreds of sticky notes marking my favorite poems. I have books by my favorite poets that also have sticky notes marking my favorite poems. And now, I have added Broetry to that collection. Broetry had me laughing, reminiscing, thinking back on my high school years. I loved the references to things I grew up with, like Nickelodeon's Are You Afraid of the Dark?, Rugrats, and the big orange couch (which I had forgotten about until I read this book). I loved the poems about more modern celebrities, like Taylor Swift. I thought it was awesome when, in those poems about Taylor Swift and Nicole Scherzinger, McGackin included references to their songs. I loved the plays on famous poems, like William Carlos Williams' This Is Just To Say, which is one of my favorite poems, Walt Whitman's O Captain! My Captain! and two Robert Frost poems (The Road Not Taken and Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening). I love it that McGackin writes about every day things, things we can all relate to in some way. It's been a long time since I've written any poetry, as I've been focusing on fiction lately, but Broetry makes me want to start writing poetry again. It's inspiring. I want more from Brian McGackin, and since I'm feeling slightly greedy today, I want it now. This is a great book for anyone who's never really read poetry and is hesitant to start. Broetry contains some seriously awesome poems, and I think (and hope) it's the type of book that will make more people want to read poetry.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    To get one thing out of the way: I am SO not the target audience for this book. From the introduction: "Broetry is poetry for dudes. It's poetry for people who don't like poetry." I'm not a dude, and, well, I was an English major, so while I don't consider myself a poetry lover I feel like there must be some sort of appreciation for the form hardwired into my brain somewhere. And yet, despite my non-dudeness, I enjoyed the book. It was surprisingly refreshing to read poetry that wasn't about Big To get one thing out of the way: I am SO not the target audience for this book. From the introduction: "Broetry is poetry for dudes. It's poetry for people who don't like poetry." I'm not a dude, and, well, I was an English major, so while I don't consider myself a poetry lover I feel like there must be some sort of appreciation for the form hardwired into my brain somewhere. And yet, despite my non-dudeness, I enjoyed the book. It was surprisingly refreshing to read poetry that wasn't about Big Topics, and of course anyone who knows me is well aware that I love a good parody. I was a little disappointed, though, that none of the straight-up parodic poems were as good, to my mind, as the one on the front cover (though "O Captain! My Captain America!" comes close). It's a little like a comedy movie giving away all its best lines in its trailers. Still, though, the book made me chuckle, and there were some instances of real inspiration, as in "Not Another Teen Movie," which cleverly tracks the trajectory of a relationship using only movie titles. My favorite title, which I feel the need to mention just because I giggle every time I read it: "The Road Unable To Be Taken Because I'm Trapped Behind a Line of Dudes in Stormtrooper Armor Who Feel the Need to Take Pictures with Every Girl They See Wearing a Slave Leia Outfit". I know those dudes, and I'm pretty sure I've been in line behind them before. All in all, a fun, quick, light read. Not something I would recommend for anyone who takes their poetry too seriously, obviously, but a nice diversion for the rest of us. (My copy of the book was sent to me by Quirk Books. Thank you, Eric!)

  29. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    So, I'm not really a bro, and thus I may not be the target audience for Broetry, but I did think it was pretty funny. It was a little rough for me in the beginning, but then I started to get into the spirit of the broems. I particularly enjoyed "College + Love- Love=College," which is a clever series of linguistic equations, kind of like little riddles. "Impact" is kind of a Frostian ode to football season and "Ode to Taylor Swift" is just what it sounds like, and is pretty charming and funny. T So, I'm not really a bro, and thus I may not be the target audience for Broetry, but I did think it was pretty funny. It was a little rough for me in the beginning, but then I started to get into the spirit of the broems. I particularly enjoyed "College + Love- Love=College," which is a clever series of linguistic equations, kind of like little riddles. "Impact" is kind of a Frostian ode to football season and "Ode to Taylor Swift" is just what it sounds like, and is pretty charming and funny. Towards the end of the book, some of the poems seemed more weighty, less strictly comic, and actually kind of honest about being young in our culture. Brian McGackin obviously knows his poetry (with the Master's Degree to prove it). He uses the conventions, the forms, and accomplishes adept imitations of many famous poets before him, whether it is their style, their form, or their tone that he borrows. The cover of his book is "an homage" to William Carlos Williams, "This is Just to Say," a poem I happen to love to teach, and which has been oft rewritten, but never quite in this way. It is the content, the subject matter, that is different in this little book of "poems for people who don't like poetry." I don't entirely get "broetry," although I did enjoy reading it as I got deeper into the collection. But then again, I already like poetry, and I do think that this little book could maybe make some converts. ** disclosure: I was provided a copy of this book by the publisher for review

  30. 4 out of 5

    Becky R.

    Brian McGackin's short poetry compilation Boetry is a funny take on being a "Bro" and all that entails from a cheeky, occasional mock up of previous classical poems to funny new dedications/observations on popular culture and young adulthood. The mix of college drama, popular superheroes, and single-guy angst was pretty funny to read and had me sharing them with some of the guys I work with. Having said that, I don't think you have to be a single guy to enjoy these poems; they are light-hearted Brian McGackin's short poetry compilation Boetry is a funny take on being a "Bro" and all that entails from a cheeky, occasional mock up of previous classical poems to funny new dedications/observations on popular culture and young adulthood. The mix of college drama, popular superheroes, and single-guy angst was pretty funny to read and had me sharing them with some of the guys I work with. Having said that, I don't think you have to be a single guy to enjoy these poems; they are light-hearted and funny and can be enjoyed by anyone with a sense of humor about contemporary society. This little book of poetry is very much a satirical look at young adulthood and popular culture. Yes, there is some strong language and references to drinking, but it's a Bro's view on his life! For the audience and purpose in the poetry, I got a good laugh and think a few of my coworkers have picked up their own copy as well. I really enjoyed this little collection of poems and can pretty much open it up at any time and get a good chuckle. Besides, who said poetry had to be serious and philosophical all the time? Where would we be without a good satire to highlight things in our society we don't always readily recognize. Check it out!

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