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The Scarecrow of Oz

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Children will delight in the further adventures of Dorothy, Glenda, the munchkins and her friends as they revisit Oz. Frank Baum was a famous author of children's books. He is best noted for his book The Wizard of Ox. Baum used several pen names when writing different series. He used the pen name Edith van Dyke when writing books for adolescent girls. In The Scarecrow of O Children will delight in the further adventures of Dorothy, Glenda, the munchkins and her friends as they revisit Oz. Frank Baum was a famous author of children's books. He is best noted for his book The Wizard of Ox. Baum used several pen names when writing different series. He used the pen name Edith van Dyke when writing books for adolescent girls. In The Scarecrow of Oz Cap'n Bill and Trot, a young girl, are caught in a whirlpool that begins their journey to Oz. Fortunately Scarecrow saves them from a dreadful fate and they reach Ozma's splendid palace. This is a 1915 sequel to Tik-Tok of Oz. For grades 4-7.


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Children will delight in the further adventures of Dorothy, Glenda, the munchkins and her friends as they revisit Oz. Frank Baum was a famous author of children's books. He is best noted for his book The Wizard of Ox. Baum used several pen names when writing different series. He used the pen name Edith van Dyke when writing books for adolescent girls. In The Scarecrow of O Children will delight in the further adventures of Dorothy, Glenda, the munchkins and her friends as they revisit Oz. Frank Baum was a famous author of children's books. He is best noted for his book The Wizard of Ox. Baum used several pen names when writing different series. He used the pen name Edith van Dyke when writing books for adolescent girls. In The Scarecrow of Oz Cap'n Bill and Trot, a young girl, are caught in a whirlpool that begins their journey to Oz. Fortunately Scarecrow saves them from a dreadful fate and they reach Ozma's splendid palace. This is a 1915 sequel to Tik-Tok of Oz. For grades 4-7.

30 review for The Scarecrow of Oz

  1. 5 out of 5

    Evgeny

    Cap'n Bill and Trot are the characters from the other author series. Their appearance here makes this installment a crossover. Crossover or not, the overall plot is very similar to that of the previous book. These two people were sucked in a giant whirlpool and ended up in an unknown place. They had a lot of adventures and met some exotic creatures trying to get to civilization - the Land of Oz in this case. If you think it sounds familiar - Dorothy was in this same situation at least 4 times be Cap'n Bill and Trot are the characters from the other author series. Their appearance here makes this installment a crossover. Crossover or not, the overall plot is very similar to that of the previous book. These two people were sucked in a giant whirlpool and ended up in an unknown place. They had a lot of adventures and met some exotic creatures trying to get to civilization - the Land of Oz in this case. If you think it sounds familiar - Dorothy was in this same situation at least 4 times before and so was Betsy Bobbin in the last book - you are absolutely right. Continuing with the similarity of the previous book, this one was named after another old favorite character who appeared well in the second half of the tale and did not have time to do anything exciting whatsoever. Last time it was Tik-Tok and this time it was Scarecrow's turn. Ozma and Dorothy make a guest appearance at the very end in both cases. This installment was supposed to be Baum's favorite, but I did not find it such because of all the repetitions I mentioned above. It was entertaining enough to be better than 2 stars and annoying enough (read: riddled with plot-holes) to be worse than 4 stars, so 3 stars it is. At this point I will continue with the series for two reasons: the books are short and I want to read the last Baum's book - something about its reviews made me curious.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Shoshana

    I'll start with the one flaw: Too much boring stuff at the end when the main plot thread is already resolved. Baum does this a lot. I forgive him in this book because it is just so good. It never used to be a favorite of mine, but now it might be my absolutely favorite of the 9 I've read in a row. The opening chapters are among my favorite chapters Baum has ever written - when Trot and Cap'n Bill are hanging out waiting to sail. They are languid and warm and everything I want in a book sometimes. I'll start with the one flaw: Too much boring stuff at the end when the main plot thread is already resolved. Baum does this a lot. I forgive him in this book because it is just so good. It never used to be a favorite of mine, but now it might be my absolutely favorite of the 9 I've read in a row. The opening chapters are among my favorite chapters Baum has ever written - when Trot and Cap'n Bill are hanging out waiting to sail. They are languid and warm and everything I want in a book sometimes. Trot is my favorite of the little girls. I figured out a few minutes ago that there is a key to why this is so. Here is where everyone is from in the Oz books: Dorothy: Kansas The Wizard: Omaha, Nebraska Betsy: Oklahoma The Shaggy Man: Colorado Trot: California. One of these things is better than the others! Anyway. I think the Ork is super cool, and I like the way he talks about Orkland. Button-Bright has gotten more likable. The whole scene with the Bumpy Man being the Mountain Ear is so weird but great. Oh! BTW, Button Bright is from Philadelphia, they think. That's ok, I guess, but it's no California. P.S. I thought Oz was supposed to be completely invisible, not just hidden by pink fog. Oh well - I guess when the kids called Baum's bluff about not writing anymore he had to modify so he could actually get people in and out. I love that Trot already knows about the Land of Oz. Maybe this is discussed in the other two books about her and Cap'n Bill? I have to check them out ASAP - the Sea Fairies and Sky Island - because I want to read more about Trot. I love how Baum essentially makes fun of the traditional fantasy world love story with princesses and kings and gardener's boys and the like. "The King wanted her to marry a rich courtier named Googly-Goo, who is old enough to be Gloria's father. She has refused Googly-Goo thirty-nine times..." hahahaha. And I love how Trot is totally scornful of Pon the gardener's boy at all times and keeps trying to convince Gloria to pick someone else to love. And I REALLY love the bit where King Krewl and Googly-Goo smile at each other at the end of chapter 11. I love that the Woozy reappears at the end.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    I like to think of this as Baum's big crossover episode. Not having read a lot of Baum outside of the Oz books, I was a little thrown off by these two characters I was clearly supposed to know already (from Baum's Sea Fairies and Sky Island it turns out) but it's easy enough to recover. Both Trot and Cap'n Bill are hard not to like, and the change of pace is more than a little refreshing after all the sameness in the previous book. There is another shipwreck (of sorts) but it at least happens in I like to think of this as Baum's big crossover episode. Not having read a lot of Baum outside of the Oz books, I was a little thrown off by these two characters I was clearly supposed to know already (from Baum's Sea Fairies and Sky Island it turns out) but it's easy enough to recover. Both Trot and Cap'n Bill are hard not to like, and the change of pace is more than a little refreshing after all the sameness in the previous book. There is another shipwreck (of sorts) but it at least happens in a cool and creative way and even though it's kind of another road trip sort of book, the characters feel fresh and so do the adventures. So fresh in fact, that even when Button Bright (sadly, a character we are all too familiar with from before) reappears, he is really a completely different character than we knew before. Apparently he must have cameoed in those other books and had some sense knocked into him. From this point forward, he might be seriously directionally challenged, but he's at least not the same whiny empty-headed boy we knew before. Hilariously, Baum outdoes himself here with another example of his almost-arbitrary titles. Would you believe that the Scarecrow doesn't even make an appearance until Chapter 13? Truth. Scarecrow's very brief role in this is at least pretty dramatic though--so you can't say that he doesn't ever get his moment in the sun. It does prompt some serious questions about the use---or lack thereof--of Ozma's magic mirror (and Glinda's Book of Records) however, when our good friend finds himself in the most dire straits yet, with no Ozian help on the horizon.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Latasha

    lol I love these book because to the modern reader, they are so messed up. making fun of people with only 1 eye, turning people's heart to ice... I didn't love this story as much as ozma of oz but it wasn't awful.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sara Santos

    3,5

  6. 5 out of 5

    Garrett Kilgore

    I really enjoyed the back half of the book, once they got to Oz. The romantic subplot was delightful and I can always use more Orks

  7. 5 out of 5

    Grace

    This book had a bit of a different feel to it, even though it followed the basic Oz book outline (person from earth gets lost in some mysterious/natural disaster-related way, then has sundry adventures as they road-trip their way to the Emerald City). The two main characters - Trot and Cap'n Bill - appeared in a non-Oz book of Baum's, which I have not read. There are references to that story, but this story is stand-alone enough so that you're not lost if you haven't read the characters' other s This book had a bit of a different feel to it, even though it followed the basic Oz book outline (person from earth gets lost in some mysterious/natural disaster-related way, then has sundry adventures as they road-trip their way to the Emerald City). The two main characters - Trot and Cap'n Bill - appeared in a non-Oz book of Baum's, which I have not read. There are references to that story, but this story is stand-alone enough so that you're not lost if you haven't read the characters' other story. A nice cross-over idea, and Baum handled it well. Trot and Cap'n Bill were engaging and entertaining characters, as was the supporting cast. And even though the bad guys (King Krewl and Blinkie the witch) didn't show up till the final third of the book, they made for good antagonists, and kept the story from being too much of a "randomly wandering through Oz" tale. My only complaints were the abrupt ending (a common thing in a lot of the Oz books), and the lack of the titular character (another common issue). The Scarecrow saved the day and was a key figure at the end of the book, but it was really Trot and Cap'n Bill's story, not the Scarecrow's. Overall, another great addition to the Oz saga.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca McNutt

    The last time I read any of the Oz books I was in middle school, but I decided to read this one again because I remember it the most out of all of them. The detailed fantasy world within the pages and the friendship of the characters makes it really a book worth reading.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tom Durham Jr.

    Review 3 To begin this EXCITING review, I would like to just say that this is by far the weirdest book you will ever read. You have been warned. L. Frank Baum has a VERY unique imagination and way of writing. Although he may be… (let’s just leave it at that), he did write the legendary novel The Wizard of Oz. It is obvious because this book happens to be The Scarecrow of Oz. In fact all his books follow the same title formula “The *Blank* of Oz”. I have already marked that against this book’s sta Review 3 To begin this EXCITING review, I would like to just say that this is by far the weirdest book you will ever read. You have been warned. L. Frank Baum has a VERY unique imagination and way of writing. Although he may be… (let’s just leave it at that), he did write the legendary novel The Wizard of Oz. It is obvious because this book happens to be The Scarecrow of Oz. In fact all his books follow the same title formula “The *Blank* of Oz”. I have already marked that against this book’s star rating. LACK OF IMAGINATION FOR TITLES. That’s a big one for chapter books. He spent all his imagination on really weird characters. This book happens to be a children's book. That seems odd because it is 288 pages. That is a lot of pages for a kids book. Luckily, the text is big and the grammar is bad so it’s easy to read. This book takes place in the mystical land of Oz. Actually, scratch that, It takes place all over a whole BUNCH of magical lands. Just to excite you to read this book, it’s not that good. To excite you even more, there is hardly a story at all. AND WHAT’S EVEN MORE EXCITING, all the characters don’t learn anything throughout the whole book! To be entirely honest I still enjoyed this book because it was so lighthearted and had a happy ending. This would actually be a good book for children to read because it is so childish and can open new doors to imagination. Now, unless your children are going to be quoting “But I’ll never love Googly-Goo,” (Pg.152) and, “Because I have no nerves, such as you meat people possess.” (Pg.211) I would not suggest reading this extremely odd book to them because I would hate to be called a Meat Person. That would make me feel fat. Now we get to the fun part. What would the theme be of such an interesting story? Actually I have no idea so we will move on. The Tone of this book is extremely playful and silly. You can tell by the extremely absurd names such as “Googly-Goo” and “Blinkie” (Pg.153) So if you like approximately 6 hours of silly names, than this is the right book for you. One big thing in this book is the Setting. The setting is VERY ,VERY ,VERY ,unique. The world, that half of the story takes place in is completely separated from Oz making it different from most stories where the entire world is involved. The setting takes place in a more renaissance-ish part of the world. It also has a very interesting mix of magic and made up creatures making it very different (in a good and bad way). This is a very…let’s just say you need to have very eclectic taste to read this book. But if you do, it’s great.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    One of the worse Oz books. The story was decent but it did not match up with other oz books. Ozma, Glinda, and the Wizard could not use their great powers to remove the bad king and evil witch so they send the Scarecrow. All the characters from the other books are here but they are shoved into chapters near the end of the book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

    L. Frank Baum has such a wonderful imagination! The scarecrow wasn't really the main character in this (despite the title), but Trot and her friends are a nice little group. My favorite parts of these books are the different lands/areas that get visited - so fun.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Sizemore

    80/100 Supposedly this was Baum's favorite of his Oz books. I can understand why, particularly if you're a fan of the Scarecrow but it follows a similar pattern to the rest of the series. Some new character shows up, familiar characters meet them, they have adventures in a new place and finally get to the Emerald City.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Garrett Zecker

    Doma Publishing's Wizard of Oz collection has taken me several years to read with my son at bedtime. It was interesting revisiting the texts that I read swiftly through my youth, as I was about his age when I read them and remembered little beyond some of the characters that don't appear in any of the books. I picked up a copy of this version since, for 99c, I could have the complete series along with "All the original artwork by the great illustrator W.W. Denslow (over 1,000 classic illustratio Doma Publishing's Wizard of Oz collection has taken me several years to read with my son at bedtime. It was interesting revisiting the texts that I read swiftly through my youth, as I was about his age when I read them and remembered little beyond some of the characters that don't appear in any of the books. I picked up a copy of this version since, for 99c, I could have the complete series along with "All the original artwork by the great illustrator W.W. Denslow (over 1,000 classic illustrations)", and to read the complete 14-book text at bedtime with all original color illustrations on my Kindle Fire knowing that there would be cross-linked tables of contents and no layout issues, it was worth my buck rather than taking them all out of the library. We read these books before bed at home and under the stars by a campfire in the forest, in a hotel in Montreal and in a seaside cottage in Nova Scotia, on a boat and in a car. We read it everywhere, thanks to the Kindle's mobility. You may be reading this review on one of the individual pages for the original books on Goodreads or Amazon, and if so, all I did was cross-link the books along with the correct dates we read the original texts. The only book I did not cross-link with original dates was the Woggle-bug book, which if you know, is short. Instead, I counted that final book as the review for Doma's Kindle version. You may notice that some books have longer reading spans – probably for two reasons. One, I traded off reading with my wife sometimes, and two, sometimes we needed a little Baum break and read some other books. It did get a little old sometimes, and there are fourteen books totaling 3500 pages in their original library printing. The first thing I think is worth mentioning is that when I first read these books, it was as a child would read them. I remember them being repetitive but familiar. Comforting and revealing. An antiquated adventure, but a serial adventure with recurring characters unparalleled in any other literature. As an adult with an MA in literature (and soon and MFA in fiction), I am actually somewhat unimpressed with the series. Baum wrote a whimsical set of tales, but they are torturously repetitive and would be easy to plug-and-play by replacing characters and moments with a computer to make an entirely new book. But, they are children's books, and we are completely enthralled and comforted by the familiar. Is not Shakespeare the same play-to-play structurally? Are not Pixar or Star Wars movies definitively archetypal in timing, execution, structure, and character so that they can be completely replaced and reapplied to a new story? Even the films – heck, even the trailers - are cut the same, and if you play them all at once, magic happens (see: youtube, "all star wars movies at once"). I suppose where the real magic of these books happens is in their origin. Baum wrote something completely original that took the world by storm and continues to be a whimsical American bellwether for children's fantasy. It is one of the original series specifically for children, spanning fourteen books written almost yearly and gobbled up by a hungry public. It still remains at the forefront of American culture in many revisits in Hollywood (let no one forget the horrific beauty that is Return To Oz) and capitalizing on nostalgia (as recently as six months ago I received a mailing from The Bradford Exchange that was selling original library-bound volumes signed by – get this – Baum's great-grandson... I love an autographed book if only for the idea of the magic it transmits even though it is somewhat meaningless, but maybe someone can convince me where the magic is in having it signed by a probably elderly great-grandchild who likely never met his great-grandfather?). So, while some of the books were awesome and some of them were difficult to slog through, I have my favorites. I will also say that the introductions that each volume opens with were sweet letters from the author to his fans, and it was easy to tell that he truly, truly loved his job writing for children. He knew his audience, he knew what worked, and he sold books. Furthermore, I imagined with great sentimentality mailbags upon mailbags arriving at his house filled to the brim of letters from children all over the world, and the responsibility he probably felt to personally respond to each of them. For my career, that is the best anyone can hope for. What follows is my (and my son's) short reviews of the individual books in the series. The Original and Official Oz Books by L. Frank Baum #1 The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900) READ November 26, 2013 – December 1, 2013 My Kid – At first I thought it was crazy, but then it started getting awesome. I remember the movie, but there's a lot of parts that are different. Me – I mean, classic, right? The book pretty much follows the film almost entirely with few exceptions. In hindsight after finishing the entire series, it is worth nothing that it is considerably one of the best books in the series, while many others are of questionable quality. #2 The Marvelous Land of Oz (1904) READ December 1, 2013 – January 9, 2014 My Kid – It was scary... Jack Pumpkinhead and Tip escaped and it was really cool. Me – This is one of the books Return to Oz was based from, The Gump and The Powder of Life coming into play to help Dorothy and Jack Pumpkinhead outwit Mombi. An enjoyable book, quite different than the first book but engineered beautifully with plot and characterization. Enjoyed this one. What was most engaging about this text was Ozma and Tip, and what this book says about gender and youth. I think there is a lot that can be examined about gender at birth and the fluidity of gender as a social construct, witch curse or no. #3 Ozma of Oz (1907) READ January 9, 2014 – February 22, 2014 My Kid – The boat crashes and they have to ride in the box with the chicken... I like TikTok. They saved the Queen. Me – This is the second book that Return to Oz was conceived from and a very engaging book. This one requires more understanding and construction of the Oz Universe including the transformation of several of our characters into ornaments and the outwitting of the Nome King in order to save our friends. This was one of my final favorites before the quality of the books fell, as far as I am concerned. #4 Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz (1908) READ February 22, 2014 – August 12, 2014 My Kid – I kinda forgot this one. There was the vegetable people underground and nothing really happened? Me – Yeah, this one was a bust for me. I think Baum was making some kind of satirical point lost to history... Or maybe the obvious non-referential one, but still, just seemed like the episodic nonsense that didn't have a point most of the time. Keep the beginning, I guess and then skip to the final third, and there's your story. #5 The Road to Oz (1909) READ August 12, 2014 – February 22, 2015 My Kid – The love magnet was pretty awesome, and Dorothy meets the rainbow girl and Shaggy man... I guess I'll leave off there. Me – Another one that I thought was a little redundant and repetitive without much of a point. They get lost, they make it back, there are some weird artifacts that help them... Meh. I did like the new characters, however, who make many more appearances in the future books. Shaggy Man and Polychrome are great. #6 The Emerald City of Oz (1910) READ February 22, 2015 – September 14, 2015 My Kid – The Emerald City was cool and Dorothy was in charge. If I lived there I would sell it all and be rich. There was a war. Me – This one was pretty good until the end, where everything was buttoned up (apologies, button bright) pretty quickly without there being much of a solid reason. The conflicts were all contrived and there were some more ridiculously ridiculous new characters who never showed up again in the series. A great diversion, but with little substance toward the end. #7 The Patchwork Girl of Oz (1913) READ September 14, 2015 – December 22, 2015 My Kid – It was pretty weird how the quilt doll became a patchwork girl and she was really funny. In the end, it didn't matter that they found all the stuff, so it was kinda crazy and funny. Me – This was relatively silly. I enjoyed it, and the Patchwork Girl is a character I can really get behind as a foil to some of the other characters and somewhat mischievous. The plot is ridiculous, but the powder of life and the glass cat are somewhat illuminating elements of this text. Scraps made this a fun one. #8 Tik-Tok of Oz (1914) READ December 22, 2015 – April 2, 2016 My Kid – The whole story of the shaggy man's brother being missing and ugly didn’t make sense, but... there was a war and Tik Tok was rescued. There was a man who was not as evil as the other army general guys. It was weird. Me – This one was primarily about The Shaggy Man and his adventure to resolve a variety of political and interconnected issues happening surrounding everyone's messing around with the Nome King. There is a huge tube that goes through the center of the earth that everything centers on, and Shaggy is trying to get the Nome King to release his brother the whole time. There are a lot of characterization, detail, and plot errors in this that postdate some facts from the earlier books – which is kind of weird – and the intrigue surrounding the plot is somewhat complicating for kids. What I thought was the coolest element was the character of Quox, who passes more than a coincidental resemblance to Catbus from Miyazaki's Totoro. #9 The Scarecrow of Oz (1915) READ April 2, 2016 – September 1, 2016 My Kid – First of all, there's a lot of people getting lost. Second, if I was in Jinxland, I think I would rather be back in oz. Me – This one was interesting as it had little to do with The Scarecrow and was mainly about Button Bright, Cap'n Bill, and Trot. This one is probably the height of the ridiculousness, with little shallow plot item after little shallow plot item heaped upon one another. At the end, The Scarecrow has to (and succeeds) in recapturing Jinxland for Gloria, its rightful ruler, and returns to the Emerald City for a celebration. Eh... #10 Rinkitink in Oz (1916) READ September 1, 2016 – December 1, 2016 My Kid – All these books have someone wicked in them and it's so crazy. I liked the name Kaliko, and the way Dorothy comes to the rescue of everyone being clever solves the problem. What's with all the problems? I feel like there's thousands. Me – This one was pretty good, as it seemed to deviate from the regular universe of Oz and focus on a different set of locations and characters. It had a very Tolkienian feel in terms of plot, structure, and internal political commentary. It felt very different from the others, and most elements in the text had a point and a long-term purpose. I enjoyed this one. #11 The Lost Princess of Oz (1917) READ December 1, 2016 – January 19, 2017 My Kid – First of all, they've gotta be responsible for the diamond pan, and that's why they lost it. They weren't responsible. At the end they searched for the tools and didn't need them and it was useless. Me – Lost Princess was fun. It surrounded the story of Ozma being kidnapped and the Wizard, Button Bright, Trot, and Betsy Bobbin to go rescue her. Everything in this one felt a little random, but it all ties back together in the end. This one was pretty diversionary but not as bad as some of the others. #12 The Tin Woodman of Oz (1918) READ January 19, 2017 – March 13, 2017 My Kid – Woot is a weird name, and everyone was changed to animals and monkeys and none of them matched up. It was all pretty weird because they all had their new needs as animals and it didn't match with what they were. The love story was kinda weird since the girl didn't want the tin woodmen anymore and the fact that they left and it was all for nothing didn't make sense. Me – A lot of randomness in this one as well, but there is a love story at its core as we learn of a twin brother that the Tin Woodman had all along who shares the love of a long lost young lady named Nimee Amee. A lot of diversionary stories, adventures, and one cool twist by the end, and everyone arrives back where they started. Not the best, but entertaining. This one, while random at times, was a quality read. #13 The Magic of Oz (1919) READ March 13, 2017 – April 25, 2017 My Kid – I wish you could transform yourself. Like... What if you wanted to turn yourself into a pea shooter from Plants Vs Zombies? I don't even know how to pronounce the word. I never heard of it, this nonsense word. Me – This one had a funny gimmick in it with a secret word that when spoken could turn anyone into anything. There is a war on, and a secret force is transforming monkeys into superhuman soldiers (and there is a complication that no one in oz can be hurt but what happens when someone is chopped into a hundred living pieces?). This one was enjoyable, but the gimmick is honestly the only thing holding it all together. #14 Glinda of Oz (1920) READ April 25, 2017 – May 23, 2017 My Kid – This one was kinda like a world of them figuring out what is going on with the big glass house-world under-water. The opposite of everything and they couldn't figure out how to get it back to normal, so what was going on with the war the whole time? Then they fix it. Everything is all set. Me – This posthumous volume seemed to be pieced together from notes, as there is a clear difference between the tone of prior volumes and this one. The cadence and structure of the language and story is quite different in parts, and I found it takes itself seriously by comparison. Beautiful art and architecture present this journey, and I have to say, the fact that this was in new hands really shows because there is some wonderful structure that is absent in the other volumes, as well as even reintroductions to the characters when they show up. The end was a little too tidy with another deus ex machina, but the fact that it came from something that was surprising and there all along was different. *BONUS Oz Works by L. Frank Baum, 'the Royal Historian of Oz' The Woggle-Bug Book (1905) READ May 23, 2017 – May 24, 2017 My Kid – Actually, I don't have a review for my kid... See below. Me – This book started cute and had a cute premise. When I began reading it at bedtime, the kid had fallen asleep. I tend to keep reading and save our spot, and then pick it up where he fell asleep the next night. Lucky for me, the terrifyingly racist parlance in this book started after he fell asleep. I read through to the end, with no intention of going back with him tomorrow... It was... shockingly indifferent to complete disregard for everyone. From switching between "Oriental" and "Chinaman" and having a character with a dialect that wasn't just a stereotype but also a stereotype of a racist's impression wasn't nearly as bad as the way Baum used the N-word (and had the character as a monkey's monkey). It was offensive and seemed ridiculously gratuitous for even the time it was published. Not a shining moment for his work at all... But it was pretty cool to learn the Woggle Bug was from Boston, anyway. This one was pretty awful.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Annette

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I often get lost in the bedlam of an old lady intoxicated with bringing children's literature characters to a puppet style -could be doll or puppet. When discussing this Scarecrow of Oz I kept thinking of how the Scarecrow related to the Patchwork Doll and there or here is where me brain go to writing on and on... Separate books, but the similarity of his silly characters makes any reader of his Baum's work link the thinking to fantasy and Blah lost...! Created my own Patchwork Girl and charact I often get lost in the bedlam of an old lady intoxicated with bringing children's literature characters to a puppet style -could be doll or puppet. When discussing this Scarecrow of Oz I kept thinking of how the Scarecrow related to the Patchwork Doll and there or here is where me brain go to writing on and on... Separate books, but the similarity of his silly characters makes any reader of his Baum's work link the thinking to fantasy and Blah lost...! Created my own Patchwork Girl and characters on a raft for the public library in 2014. Gave the lovely large size Scarecrow back to the library 2016. The story of this marvelous stuffed doll that is just as silly as the scarecrow, but the secret powder brings wonders of life experience to this story of Baum's. Old old movie of the Patchwork girl of Oz, sometimes the video has a virus in it. Maybe more honest owners of the video are out there. I love Baum's work, so in 1976 my mother and I traveled to San Diego and followed a story about Baum's having scrounged and had an adventure along the coast line. Caves, and hidden story OH MY! American classic children's literature should be a study in itself, but many other countries love his work Baum' and Washington Irving-both have a hidden secret waiting for a researcher to locate some unknown "ditty" (boy I cannot stand to see this printed or used by me, a Library Science Professor used the term, and she hated all of the BA undergrad students seeking a minor in LS/literature). HA! HA! my signature silly code. atk to my g grandmother E. who gave our family a gift 1917-1920.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sean McBride

    The further we get into the series, the further from Oz we seem to get. Baum as the "Royal Historian" keeps expanding the world and creating interesting characters, but on top of that he always brings everything back to the Emerald City right at the end to tie everything up. In this installment we meet Capt'n Bill and Trot, who apparently have a few books on their own (This is the 9th book in the Oz series and the 3rd in the Trot and Capt'n Bill series). Their adventures are provocative, and we The further we get into the series, the further from Oz we seem to get. Baum as the "Royal Historian" keeps expanding the world and creating interesting characters, but on top of that he always brings everything back to the Emerald City right at the end to tie everything up. In this installment we meet Capt'n Bill and Trot, who apparently have a few books on their own (This is the 9th book in the Oz series and the 3rd in the Trot and Capt'n Bill series). Their adventures are provocative, and we see a new side of Oz, one that is closed off by a large gulf and a mountain range. More cruel rulers (in fact the King's name is Krewl), and more clever word play. It's an entertaining series, but still nothing like I expected. I wonder where Baum will take it next as there are only 5 more books (that he wrote, in the series...it was continued on by Ruth Plumley Thompson), and I remember reading somewhere that he tried to have some closure on the series. We will see!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Victoria

    This book introduces two characters, Cap'n Bill and Trot, who first made an appearance in another of Baum's fantasy stories. Although their former adventures aren't really explained in this book, the implicit backstory added a bit of depth to the characters, something that was lacking in other characters introduced to the Oz series - Betsy Bobbin, for example. The dynamic between Trot and Cap'n Bill was quite sweet, and their adventures were fairly engaging. My main problem with this book was it This book introduces two characters, Cap'n Bill and Trot, who first made an appearance in another of Baum's fantasy stories. Although their former adventures aren't really explained in this book, the implicit backstory added a bit of depth to the characters, something that was lacking in other characters introduced to the Oz series - Betsy Bobbin, for example. The dynamic between Trot and Cap'n Bill was quite sweet, and their adventures were fairly engaging. My main problem with this book was its fairly formulaic plot, especially towards the end. Ozma's castle seems to be becoming rather crowded with mortals from the Outside!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Ricker

    This was supposedly Baum's favorite of the Oz books, and the beginning is surprisingly adult, with Trot and Cap'n Bill trapped underground. There are some genuinely scary moments, and I found myself really liking the main characters. The adventures in Jinxland later in the book were less enjoyable and less realistic, and it wasn't terribly clear why the Scarecrow got top billing in the title, given his limited involvement.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Patricia Vocat

    This series is clearly written for children, but it's entertaining enough for adults to enjoy. As in all Oz books I read so far the main characters end up in a fantastic land and are unable to do anything other than get into serious trouble with the locals. This time the scarecrow makes his appearance towards the end to save the day. There is too little Scarecrow for a book on the Scarecrow.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mitchell

    Another Oz book. Another set of new-ish characters (and just a few old ones) on a travelogue to Oz. Sure it's a formula but not done too badly here. The Ork's are a bit of a standout, basically a kind like a bird but with propellers. And there is an evil witch and berries that make you smaller and bigger. It actually read fairly pleasantly though clearly shows its age.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Holli

    I'm sad to say none of these has re-captured the joy of the first one. They kind of all seem to be the same story over and over, in a sense. This one also contradicts the fact that there are no more wicked witches in Oz. Glinda was stated to be the only witch left in Oz, or did I miss something here?

  21. 5 out of 5

    Brandy

    Good gravy, we were better than halfway through the book before the Scarecrow--the titular character, need I remind you--even showed up. Now a bad installment--no weird racism or sexist overtones this time, at least--but kinda boring. Off to the library tomorrow to get the next one. I get a one-night reprieve from reading Oz books!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Morgan

    I liked this one. It was better then the previous book because it wasn't as confusing. I liked Trot and Cap'n Bill. Didn't care much of the Ork. And there was a little slow part with Gloria and Pon. Other then that this was a good one.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Joanna Gold

    so far pretty good i like the ork but he's a little selfish and a little spoiled theres a part in the book when the girl asks what is an ork and he says "i am!" but it was funny.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Casey Anderson

    Not my favorite but not terrible. Trot wasn't exceptionally likable. But I loved the Ork. I love learning about new lands and new parts of Oz, so that part was nice.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jason Pettus

    (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com:]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted here illegally. This review covers all 14 of the Baum Oz books, which is why it's found on all 14 book pages here.) I think it's fairly safe by now to assume that nearly everyone in Western society is familiar with The Wizard of Oz, most of us because of the classic 1939 movie adaptation; and many realize as well tha (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com:]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted here illegally. This review covers all 14 of the Baum Oz books, which is why it's found on all 14 book pages here.) I think it's fairly safe by now to assume that nearly everyone in Western society is familiar with The Wizard of Oz, most of us because of the classic 1939 movie adaptation; and many realize as well that author L. Frank Baum ended up penning a whole series of sequels, because of the original book's astounding success back at the turn of the 20th century when it was first published -- 13 sequels altogether, before his death in 1919, which after the movie's success twenty years later became a literal merchandising empire, spawning hundreds more official sequels by various authors and hundreds more unofficial ones once the characters moved into the public domain. And like many others, I've always been interested in what these 14 "canonical" Oz books have to say; and that's why I decided this winter to sit down and read them all in a row for the first time, easy to do because of them being available for free at both Project Gutenberg and the email subscription service DailyLit (which is how I myself read them, and in fact is how I read many of the older books you see reviewed here; I'm a big fan of theirs, and highly recommend them). But of course, to even approach these books with the right mindset, it's important to understand that like so many other one-hit-wonders, Baum was not only eluded by success in most of his other endeavors but was an active failure at them -- in the 1870s, for example, he unsuccessfully tried his hand at breeding fancy poultry (a national fad at the time), then in the 1880s opened his own theatre and became one of the first-ever Americans to produce modern-style stage musicals, apparently a little too ahead of its time, then in the 1890s moved to the Dakota Territory and opened a dry-goods store that eventually failed, as well as starting a newspaper that folded too. So it was sort of a case of random lightning in a bottle when he decided in the late 1890s to try his hand at children's literature, and ended up with his very first title being the most popular kid's book in America for two years straight, and no surprise that Baum then spent the rest of his life desperately trying to figure out how to bottle that lightning again. Because now that I've read it myself, I can confirm that the original Wonderful Wizard of Oz is astonishingly great, a sort of miraculous combination of traits that makes for an almost perfect children's story; and although most of it follows the same storyline seen in the '39 movie, there are also significant differences, making it worth your while to sit and read the book version if you have the interest. (And by the way, for some really interesting reading, check out the academic analysis that was done of this book in the 1960s, arguing that most of its details symbolically correspond almost exactly to various political and economic issues of the late 1800s, including the yellow brick road representing the much-discussed gold standard of that age, the scarecrow representing the then-hot Populist Party, Toto representing the teetotaler [prohibitionist:] movement, and a lot more.) But of course, there are a couple of details about this book that have been forgotten over the decades too, which also help explain its record-shattering success -- it was an unusually lavish book for its time, for example, with two-toned illustrations on every page and several full-color plates, and let's also not forget that Baum himself mounted a Broadway-style musical of Oz just two years after the book was published, a huge hit which toured nationally for a decade and that was even more insanely popular than the book itself (including making national stars out of vaudeville performers Fred Stone and David Montgomery, playing the Scarecrow and Tin Man; the stage production left out the Cowardly Lion altogether, which is why he is also barely seen in any of the 13 canonical sequels). And so that's why when Baum attempted starting up other fantasy series in the wake of Oz's success, hoping to turn all of them into lucrative franchises like the original, the audience mostly responded with yawns; and that's why Baum eventually went back to writing more and more Oz books as the 20th century continued, because by now the strength of the brand far outweighed the relative writing skills of Baum when it came to any particular volume. That's why, at least to adults, it's perhaps actually the introductions to each book that are the most fascinating thing about them; because to be frank, most of the books follow a pretty familiar formula, with a danger-filled quest involving various kooky characters that is usually finished about two-thirds of the way through, followed by a massive parade or party that lets Baum trot out the growing number of main characters added to this universe with each title. (And by the way, prepare yourself for Baum's unending love of the deus-ex-machina plot device; over half the books end along the lines of, "And then our heroes took possession of a super-duper magical device, which they waved in the air and all their troubles went away.") In fact, for those who don't know, that's why the official map of Oz and its surrounding lands eventually grew so large, because Baum still hadn't given up on his dream of having a whole series of kid-lit cash cows out there generating revenue for him, and so would use many of these Oz sequels to introduce entirely new casts of characters who live in entirely new lands, "just over the mountains" or "just past the desert" of Oz itself. By the end of the original 14 books, in fact, Baum had built up a virtual aristocracy of licensable characters, all of whom would have to be dragged out for a cameo at some point in each book to remind the audience of their existence -- not just the cast of the original book and '39 movie but also various other princesses like Ozma and Betsy Bobbin, boy characters like Ojo the Unlucky and Button Bright, adults who help them like the Shaggy Man, Cap'n Bill and Ugu the Shoemaker, and of course a whole litany of quirky fantastical sidekicks, including but not limited to Tik-Tok, Jack Pumpkinhead, the Great Jinjin, Billina the Angry Hen, Scraps the Patchwork Girl, and Polychrome the Rainbow Fairy. Whew! And so did the Great Oz Merchandising Experiment keep limping along for two decades, with each sequel selling less and less and getting lazier and lazier (for example, the tenth book in the series, 1916's Rinkitink in Oz, was actually a non-Oz book written a decade previous, published almost unchanged except for a hasty final chapter full of Oz regulars slapped onto the end); and thus did Baum's bad luck in business come back with a vengeance as well, with three more Broadway productions that were all flops, and even the establishment of a film production company in 1914 that eventually went bankrupt. You can see the progression of all this reflected in Baum's first-person introductions to each book, which like I said is why they might be the most fascinating parts of all for adult readers -- how in the first sequel, for example, he expresses legitimately gleeful surprise and joy at how passionate his fans were, and how thousands of children had literally written to him out of the blue demanding more Oz stories, while with each subsequent sequel his tone becomes more and more snarky, ala "Well, dear and wonderful children, you've yet again demanded another Oz book like the sheep you are, so here it is, you screeching little monsters." In fact, in book six of the series, 1910's The Emerald City of Oz, Baum flat-out states that it's going to be the very last Oz book, and it's no coincidence that many fans actually consider this one to be the best of the original fourteen, because of Baum's extra attention to and enthusiasm for this particular storyline, thinking as he erroneously did that it would be the grand finale of the entire Oz universe; but after his later financial failures forced him back into the Oz business again, the gloves finally come off in his introductions, with most of the rest sounding to today's ears something like, "Well, okay, here again is the sugary teat you all apparently can't get enough of suckling, you infuriating little animals, so open wide and take your medicine." Now, of course, you shouldn't feel too bad for Baum; by the last years of his life, his combined books and plays were generating for him in today's terms roughly a quarter-million dollars a year just in personal royalties. So all in all, an experience I'm glad I had, reading all fourteen original Oz books in a row, but not something I'd recommend to others; instead, maybe better just to read the first, then skip to the sixth, then skip straight to the 14th, 1920's Glinda of Oz, because of its unusual darkness (probably caused, many scholars agree, by Baum knowing that he was near death). As with many authors I've looked at here at CCLaP, history seems to have correctly adjusted itself in Baum's case, with most of his books now rightfully falling into the obscurity they deserve, even while his one true masterpiece is still rightfully recognized as such.

  26. 4 out of 5

    A B

    This storyline is similar to the earlier Oz novels, in which a character or two has a misadventure that eventually leads to Oz and a warm welcome from its beloved permanent residents. This go round, it's the lovable Cap'n Bill and Trot - who you may already know from "The Sea Fairies" and the superb "Sky Island" - with a belated appearance by that charming little doofus Button Bright. Their journey to Oz has an element of hardship with hunger, thirst, and exhaustion, which gives way to one of the This storyline is similar to the earlier Oz novels, in which a character or two has a misadventure that eventually leads to Oz and a warm welcome from its beloved permanent residents. This go round, it's the lovable Cap'n Bill and Trot - who you may already know from "The Sea Fairies" and the superb "Sky Island" - with a belated appearance by that charming little doofus Button Bright. Their journey to Oz has an element of hardship with hunger, thirst, and exhaustion, which gives way to one of the sweetest passages in the series in which Cap'n Bill quietly gives his rations to Trot, fully knowing she'd turn them down if she knew the Cap'n was going hungry. I enjoyed their travels through sea caves and weird islands prior to landing in the autonomous kingdom of Jinxland in a remote corner of Oz. They encounter not one, but two bizarre birdlike critters. And they find Button Bright in a pile of popcorn. The story then shifts back to the spirit of the later Oz volumes with an actual mission at hand. The trio plus the Scarecrow help the good people of Jinxland overthrow a cruel monarch and restore a lovely princess to her throne. It's not a particular standout in the series, but L. Frank Baum can do no wrong in my eyes. Each Oz book is a gem in the crown of children's literature.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Hunter

    Baum appears to have reached the saturation point with Oz. 90% of The Scarecrow of Oz takes place in Jinxland, an isolated kingdom in Oz with a mean king named Krewl. (See what he did there?) So it's Oz, but not really Ozma's utopian Oz. Baum's annoyingly-repetitive formula of a motley crew journeying together and meeting random crazy characters (Bumpy Man, Blinkie, Googly-Goo, the Ork) holds sway again, but he limits the involvement of everyone's favorite Ozians (Dorothy, Toto, Tin Man, Ozma, G Baum appears to have reached the saturation point with Oz. 90% of The Scarecrow of Oz takes place in Jinxland, an isolated kingdom in Oz with a mean king named Krewl. (See what he did there?) So it's Oz, but not really Ozma's utopian Oz. Baum's annoyingly-repetitive formula of a motley crew journeying together and meeting random crazy characters (Bumpy Man, Blinkie, Googly-Goo, the Ork) holds sway again, but he limits the involvement of everyone's favorite Ozians (Dorothy, Toto, Tin Man, Ozma, Glinda, the Wizard, Glinda, Tik Tok, the Cowardly Lion, the Hungry Tiger, Jack Pumpkinhead, Betsy Bobbin, Hank the Mule, Eureka the Pink Kitten, the Woozy). Only Button-Bright and the Scarecrow play major roles in the story. The other main characters like Trot and Cap'n Bill come from Baum's other non-Oz books. The kids loved Cap'n Bill and the Orks. They seemed to enjoy this Oz installment much more than previous books. Hence the three-star ranking. Baum arrests his rankings slide, at least for one book. We'll see how things progress through his final five Oz tales.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

    3.75 stars This is one of the better stories of L. Frank Baum's Oz series! In this book there are more new characters introduced who somehow appear in the fairyland that we know of (which honestly doesn't even make sense because at one point I thought Glinda closed it off but I suppose that was forgotten by the author). The new characters are Trot, a little girl, and Cap'n Bill, a man who cares for her and has a wooden leg. They end up in some crazy cave and are starting to get worried about hunge 3.75 stars This is one of the better stories of L. Frank Baum's Oz series! In this book there are more new characters introduced who somehow appear in the fairyland that we know of (which honestly doesn't even make sense because at one point I thought Glinda closed it off but I suppose that was forgotten by the author). The new characters are Trot, a little girl, and Cap'n Bill, a man who cares for her and has a wooden leg. They end up in some crazy cave and are starting to get worried about hunger when they meet an "ork" on their journey. In time the Scarecrow does come in, but I can't really tell much about what happens in between. The way that everything fits together really works splendidly! Very nicely worked out and doesn't seem to go on and on where he just threw out some new places and creatures in a weird way like some of the other books do. This all ties and flows. I liked it. My sons liked it. We have no complaints.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lori Lyons

    This is a story about new characters who visit Oz by mistake and who end up in a part of OZ that is not easily accessible to the rest of the land of Oz. This is a good read for a child to keep them mellowing entertained. The scenes are not described in detail, so the reader should be able to use their imagination to fill in the gaps and be ok with not knowing a lot of details. At the beginning it was hard to be interested in the new characters, but as you read about their difficult adventure to f This is a story about new characters who visit Oz by mistake and who end up in a part of OZ that is not easily accessible to the rest of the land of Oz. This is a good read for a child to keep them mellowing entertained. The scenes are not described in detail, so the reader should be able to use their imagination to fill in the gaps and be ok with not knowing a lot of details. At the beginning it was hard to be interested in the new characters, but as you read about their difficult adventure to find a way home you come to enjoy their quirky companionship. Towards the end of the book some familiar Wizard of Oz characters appear to rescue the new adventures. The ending feels a bit rushed, but it is a happy fairy tale ending.

  30. 4 out of 5

    J.J. Mainor

    An up and down story for me. Wasn't too caught up with the beginning - felt too much like a random series of unrelated adventures as you see in previous installments. Once they got to Jinxland, it turned around for me. The palace intrigue was simple, but it was different from what I've seen in the previous books, and it made this a 4 star book for me until it wrapped up and the book went on 3 chapters longer than it should have with the usual shtick of our characters going to the Emerald City an An up and down story for me. Wasn't too caught up with the beginning - felt too much like a random series of unrelated adventures as you see in previous installments. Once they got to Jinxland, it turned around for me. The palace intrigue was simple, but it was different from what I've seen in the previous books, and it made this a 4 star book for me until it wrapped up and the book went on 3 chapters longer than it should have with the usual shtick of our characters going to the Emerald City and meeting all the characters from the previous books. It wasn't even an indepth meeting as it boiled down to something like "the lion and tiger were there." Furthermore, these final chapters were an attempt to retell the story - in the same book.

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