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Poetry, Language, Thought collects Martin Heidegger's pivotal writings on art, its role in human life and culture, and its relationship to thinking and truth. Essential reading for students and anyone interested in the great philosophers, this book opens up appreciation of Heidegger beyond the study of philosophy to the reaches of poetry and our fundamental relationship to Poetry, Language, Thought collects Martin Heidegger's pivotal writings on art, its role in human life and culture, and its relationship to thinking and truth. Essential reading for students and anyone interested in the great philosophers, this book opens up appreciation of Heidegger beyond the study of philosophy to the reaches of poetry and our fundamental relationship to the world. Featuring "The Origin of the Work of Art," a milestone in Heidegger's canon, this enduring volume provides potent, accessible entry to one of the most brilliant thinkers of modern times.


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Poetry, Language, Thought collects Martin Heidegger's pivotal writings on art, its role in human life and culture, and its relationship to thinking and truth. Essential reading for students and anyone interested in the great philosophers, this book opens up appreciation of Heidegger beyond the study of philosophy to the reaches of poetry and our fundamental relationship to Poetry, Language, Thought collects Martin Heidegger's pivotal writings on art, its role in human life and culture, and its relationship to thinking and truth. Essential reading for students and anyone interested in the great philosophers, this book opens up appreciation of Heidegger beyond the study of philosophy to the reaches of poetry and our fundamental relationship to the world. Featuring "The Origin of the Work of Art," a milestone in Heidegger's canon, this enduring volume provides potent, accessible entry to one of the most brilliant thinkers of modern times.

30 review for Poetry, Language, Thought

  1. 5 out of 5

    Glenn Russell

    Seven essays on poetry and the arts from German philosopher Martin Heidegger (1889-1976) are collected here, including his key work on aesthetics, The Origin of a Work of Art. However, for the purposes of this review I will focus on his less well-known essay, What Are Poets For?” Here are several direct Heidegger quotes followed by my micro-fiction serving as a tribute to what I take to be much of the spirit of this essay: “Being, which holds all beings in the balance, thus always draws particula Seven essays on poetry and the arts from German philosopher Martin Heidegger (1889-1976) are collected here, including his key work on aesthetics, The Origin of a Work of Art. However, for the purposes of this review I will focus on his less well-known essay, What Are Poets For?” Here are several direct Heidegger quotes followed by my micro-fiction serving as a tribute to what I take to be much of the spirit of this essay: “Being, which holds all beings in the balance, thus always draws particular beings toward itself – toward itself at the center.” “Everything that is ventured is, as such and such a being, admitted into the whole of beings, and reposes in the ground of the whole.” “The widest orbit of beings becomes present in the heart’s inner space. The whole of the world achieves here an equally essential presence in all its drawings.” “The objectness of the world remains reckoned in that manner of representation which deals with time and space as quanta of calculation, and which can know no more of the nature of time than of the nature of space.” “The conversion of consciousness is an inner recalling of the immanence of the objects of representation into presence within the heart’s space.” ------------------- THE POETRY BAR Thirsty, I enter a bar that’s dark, smoky and crowded, squeeze through and perch on a bar stool at the end closest the door, cross my arms on the counter and scan the faces of those around me. Many of the people are reading from sheets of paper, some reading silently, some muttering words aloud and still others reading to one another. The bartender approaches and asks me what I want, to which I, in turn, ask what he has on tap. The bartender replies, “Most anything – Byron, Blake, Stevens, Frost, Browning, William Carlos Williams, you name it.” So, it’s poetry rather than beer. I’m still thirsty but at least for now I tell him that I’ll take a Frost. The bartender obliges by handing me a copy of ‘Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening’. I read the first stanza quickly then take my time reading the next three. I pause and look over at one of the crowded booths: six men with beards and black T-shirts are huddled together listening as their leader reads aloud from what I recognized as Alan Ginsburg’s ‘Howl’. The bartender was right – they do have most everything here. I bend my head and begin to reread the first stanza of Frost when I hear great sobs from across the bar. A man with a ruddy complexion and a Scottish brogue is trying to recite Robert Burns but is having trouble because he keeps breaking down and crying. Another patron knocks roughly against me and then staggers through the door. Looking out the large front window I watch as he crosses the street, oblivious to cars and busses, as if lifted out of himself by an otherworldly ecstasy. The bartender taps me on the elbow. When I turn he nods knowingly and tells me he always tries his best to keep an eye on anyone overdoing it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Arielle

    There was one chapter about art that I read for an independent study in college. It was about 42 pages and took me, literally, all summer to read. I have never read so slowly in my life. I read every single sentence about two million times and the depth of understanding was not proportional to that number - it actually, in some cases, with some sentences, decreased. Heidegger is insanely circular and creates his own language, almost a code, which you then have to translate from his equally origi There was one chapter about art that I read for an independent study in college. It was about 42 pages and took me, literally, all summer to read. I have never read so slowly in my life. I read every single sentence about two million times and the depth of understanding was not proportional to that number - it actually, in some cases, with some sentences, decreased. Heidegger is insanely circular and creates his own language, almost a code, which you then have to translate from his equally original grammar. The brilliance of Heidegger is that he never forgets where he is in the circle and circle within a circle and the center of it is this incredibly beautiful glowing red ball that blinds you at the same time as giving you the deepest insight into the nature of reality that you've ever experienced. With words, Heidegger creates a wall you can stand on and then demolish into soft space - it is unbelievable but he creates an actual, physical world with his writing. By the time you've read a sentence or paragraph 45 times, you are living somewhere inside his world and somewhere inside your own head you've never been before. It's as if he saw the insides of people's minds and realities before they were ever born. Like the Kabbalists, the ecstasy is in the thinking and in deepening understanding at every level of thought - my life and my entire being was stunningly and profoundly changed by reading him. I owe anything I actually understood from him to an amazing teacher I had, who brilliantly and clearly illuminated his work for us. Without her help, I would have been completely lost - but lost the way you are when marveling at a mystery you'll never understand but still comprehending its beauty and ultimate, if somewhat hidden, meaning.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jonfaith

    The nature of poetry, which has now been ascertained very broadly--but not on that account vaguely, may here be kept firmly in mind as something worthy of questioning, something that still has to be thought through. The above is lifted from The Origin of the Work of Art, the second piece and first essay of this bewildering collection. Overall Poetry, Language, Thought was the most difficult text I've finished since https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2... last summer. I read nearly every page fou The nature of poetry, which has now been ascertained very broadly--but not on that account vaguely, may here be kept firmly in mind as something worthy of questioning, something that still has to be thought through. The above is lifted from The Origin of the Work of Art, the second piece and first essay of this bewildering collection. Overall Poetry, Language, Thought was the most difficult text I've finished since https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2... last summer. I read nearly every page four times. I feel as if i know all the components by name and function but have lost the instruction manual. Thus I dither. The second essay What Are Poets For left my reason blinded, a darkened room where I could appreciate Holderlin but make no sense of anything further. Building Dwelling Thinking with the deliberate absence of commas was my favorite. Afterwards there is 1950 letter from Heidegger to a young student reprinted towards the end. He advises. Practice needs craft. Stay on the path, in genuine need, and learn the craft of thinking, unswerving, yet erring. Sage advice, this reader hopes to continue. Following Beckett I aspire to fail better.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Juliekantor

    I never read the big H before, because he's a fucking Nazi. I try not to read things by fucking assholes. But the name makes some amazing points about how and why the poet/artist must create. How can a smart person also be a Nazi? I don't know.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lily Patchett

    so many circles! i don't think i made it out of the maze. im still very lost. it was fun at times - like i was on the teacup ride (a little circle inside a larger circle), but then i'd start to feel nauseous and kinda wanna be on the ground again amongst others. other times it felt like i was a circle on a venn diagram that was not intersecting with heidegger's circle but then what about everyone who doesn't intersect with heidegger's circle>??!!!!! idk idk anyway im exhausting the circle met so many circles! i don't think i made it out of the maze. im still very lost. it was fun at times - like i was on the teacup ride (a little circle inside a larger circle), but then i'd start to feel nauseous and kinda wanna be on the ground again amongst others. other times it felt like i was a circle on a venn diagram that was not intersecting with heidegger's circle but then what about everyone who doesn't intersect with heidegger's circle>??!!!!! idk idk anyway im exhausting the circle metaphors. tbh my fav thing was heidegger's unadulterated fanboying over hölderlin <3 <3 <3 ;)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Brandy

    Absolutely one of Heidegger's best works. Initially, I read specific pieces (The Origin of the Work of Art, The Thing, and Language) from the book for a couple philosophy classes for my major; however, after doing so, I decided to read the book in its entirety. I'm glad I did. I suppose one can say they are truly on a philosophical journey if and when Heidegger becomes an enjoyable read.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Poetry, Language, Thought, Martin Heidegger عنوان: شعر، زبان و اندیشهی رهایی - هفت مقاله از مارتین هایدگر همراه با زندگی تصویری هایدگر؛ مترجم: عباس منوچهری؛ مشخصات نشر: تهران، مولی، 1381، در نود و چهار، 265، مصور، شابک: 9645996503؛ موضوغ: نقد و تفسیر، زبانشناسی، شعر، فلسفه قرن 20 م Poetry, Language, Thought, Martin Heidegger عنوان: شعر، زبان و اندیشه‌ی رهایی - هفت مقاله از مارتین هایدگر همراه با زندگی تصویری هایدگر؛ مترجم: عباس منوچهری؛ مشخصات نشر: تهران، مولی، 1381، در نود و چهار، 265، مصور، شابک: 9645996503؛ موضوغ: نقد و تفسیر، زبانشناسی، شعر، فلسفه قرن 20 م

  8. 4 out of 5

    Aran

    I hereby absolve myself of any guilt over not finishing this book.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Erika Higbee

    While reading Stein’s Tender Buttons alongside Derrida’s Sign Structure, and Play, Heidegger’s Poetry, Language, Thought was a very appropriate text to continue studying the purpose of poetry— and the purpose of language and the individual word in general. The “Being,” “work-being” of the work, and various “origins” that Heidegger repeatedly makes reference to throughout the book again made me question the intangible “missing center,” “essence of the thing,” and the idea of approaching the word While reading Stein’s Tender Buttons alongside Derrida’s Sign Structure, and Play, Heidegger’s Poetry, Language, Thought was a very appropriate text to continue studying the purpose of poetry— and the purpose of language and the individual word in general. The “Being,” “work-being” of the work, and various “origins” that Heidegger repeatedly makes reference to throughout the book again made me question the intangible “missing center,” “essence of the thing,” and the idea of approaching the word “without any pre-conceptions.” The emphasis on letting the object be unaffected and that, instead of imposing oneself upon it, that one should “listen and hear” to it, is an interesting point particularly related to phenomenology. Modern linguistics and modernist writers frequently focus on such impossibilities, though often gesturing to some kind of hope. One can only imagine whether such non-preconceptual thinking and such regard to an essence— the nothingness that is always present as the determining force— will ever emerge clearly out of the text. That being said, I recommend this book as a learning guide to poetry and art! It definitely helps to read up on some phenomenology and linguistic models before reading this. I’m sure I barely grasped the surface of things. Not to mention, of course, one has to grapple with Heidegger’s Nazism. Though it is always a question whether one should separate work from author, his political beliefs definitely decreased my initial enthusiasm toward the text.

  10. 4 out of 5

    LunaBel

    This was a refreshing read. What I really like about Heidegger is his capacity to bring to the fore new definitions and to stick to them. Even though he is usually linked to Nazism, i think that people tend to forget that behind that name also lies a whole heritage of philosophy whose aim id to detect truth where we do not usually see it. But what I find a bit off is that Heidegger has been so obsessed with Being that maybe it dragged his thinking down. I know that the core of his philosophy hov This was a refreshing read. What I really like about Heidegger is his capacity to bring to the fore new definitions and to stick to them. Even though he is usually linked to Nazism, i think that people tend to forget that behind that name also lies a whole heritage of philosophy whose aim id to detect truth where we do not usually see it. But what I find a bit off is that Heidegger has been so obsessed with Being that maybe it dragged his thinking down. I know that the core of his philosophy hovers around Being, but if he put Being withing a phenomenological sphere rather a transcendental one, maybe then he wouldnt have lost himself in a blind quest whose aim is to find a Being not accessible to us. Still these essays have much to say. And I recommand this book to anyone who dares question the norms.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mr.

    Hofstader's capable translation of these extraordinary Heidegger essays makes this one of the indispensable books of 20th century philosophy. This collection is especially indicative of Heidegger's 'turn' to art and poetry, particularly in his amazingly complex 'Origin of the Work of Art' and 'Poetically, Man Dwells.' 'The Thing' is also a remarkable essay in Heidegger's descriptions of the closing of distances in modernity, as well as his phenomenological observations of the relation between th Hofstader's capable translation of these extraordinary Heidegger essays makes this one of the indispensable books of 20th century philosophy. This collection is especially indicative of Heidegger's 'turn' to art and poetry, particularly in his amazingly complex 'Origin of the Work of Art' and 'Poetically, Man Dwells.' 'The Thing' is also a remarkable essay in Heidegger's descriptions of the closing of distances in modernity, as well as his phenomenological observations of the relation between things and world. This is an excellent representation of Heidegger's philosophy of Language, and Hofstader has translated them quite well, even if the translations of Holderlin are a bit too cautious.

  12. 4 out of 5

    vi macdonald

    4.5 I'm gonna need to leave this to sit for a while. This was absolutely incredible and I think Heidegger makes some really interesting points about art (poetry especially), however I spent the entire time I was reading this feeling like my head was stuck in a vice with my brain slowly collapsing under the pressure. I feel like I'm definitely gonna have to return to this in smaller, more manageable bursts - reading individual essays over and over again, instead of trying to grapple with the entir 4.5 I'm gonna need to leave this to sit for a while. This was absolutely incredible and I think Heidegger makes some really interesting points about art (poetry especially), however I spent the entire time I was reading this feeling like my head was stuck in a vice with my brain slowly collapsing under the pressure. I feel like I'm definitely gonna have to return to this in smaller, more manageable bursts - reading individual essays over and over again, instead of trying to grapple with the entire collection as a whole. Second Read Yep, my brain still hurts.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jerry

    p. 140 (about Rilke’s “Sonnets for Orpheus”) Those who are more daring by a breath dare the venture with language. They are the sayers who more sayingly say. The converting inner recalling is the daring that dares to venture forth from the nature of many because man has language and is he who says. [could just as well be “Because man has language and is who he says.”] p. 165 All distances in time and space are shrinking… Yet the frantic abolition of all distances brings no nearness… what is happening p. 140 (about Rilke’s “Sonnets for Orpheus”) Those who are more daring by a breath dare the venture with language. They are the sayers who more sayingly say. The converting inner recalling is the daring that dares to venture forth from the nature of many because man has language and is he who says. [could just as well be “Because man has language and is who he says.”] p. 165 All distances in time and space are shrinking… Yet the frantic abolition of all distances brings no nearness… what is happening here when… everything is equally far and equally near?… Man stares at what the explosion of the atom bomb could bring with it. He does not see that the atom bomb and its explosion are the mere final emission of what has long since taken place. [because he pulled the switch long ago] p. 170 …considered scientifically, to fill a jug means to exchange one filling for another. Science’s knowledge, which is compelling within its own sphere, already had annihilated things as things long before the atom bomb exploded. p. 177 The distanceless prevails. p. 178 To die means to be capable of death as death. Only man dies. The animal perishes. p. 160 The nature of building is letting dwell. In the Black Forest, the coffin is “the tree of the dead.”—“Totenbaum” p. 161 However hard and bitter, however hampering and threatening the lack of houses remains, the real plight of dwelling does not lie merely in a lack of houses. The real plight of dwelling lies in this, that mortals ever search anew for the nature of dwelling, that they must ever learn to dwell. p. 90? In the age of the world’s night, the abyss of the world must be experienced and endured. But for this it is necessary that there be those who reach into the abyss. p. 215 Poetically man dwells Man acts as though he were the shaper and master of language, while in fact language remains the master of man. p. 225 Who is the god? Perhaps this question is too hard for man, and asked too soon. Let us therefore first ask what may be said about God. Let us first ask merely: what is God? p. 228 For a man to be blind, he must remain a being by nature endowed with sight. A piece of wood can never go blind.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Phillip

    goodreads really needs to create another option/button for couldn't read or couldn't finish. heidegger's poetry is fairly useless, and his dog-chasing-its-tail philosophy of where does art begin and where does the artist end (and vice-versa) left me cold.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Billie Pritchett

    Martin Heidegger's Poetry, Language, Thought is a very obscure book. Heidegger writes in a style all his own, with phrases that he himself has coined and using imagery that favors pastoral and religious life. Nevertheless, I will try, very briefly, to translate the upshot of the essays in this collection from "Heideggerese" into plain English (inasmuch as I can make sense of them). "The Origin of the Work of Art" is about how the purpose of artwork is to reveal tensions--like the natural world ve Martin Heidegger's Poetry, Language, Thought is a very obscure book. Heidegger writes in a style all his own, with phrases that he himself has coined and using imagery that favors pastoral and religious life. Nevertheless, I will try, very briefly, to translate the upshot of the essays in this collection from "Heideggerese" into plain English (inasmuch as I can make sense of them). "The Origin of the Work of Art" is about how the purpose of artwork is to reveal tensions--like the natural world versus the man-made world, love and hate, success and failure, freedom and fate, and so on--and remind human beings of their place in the world and the way in which their connected to the ordinary and sacred world and the natural and man-made or social world. "What Are Poets For?" is an essay about how poets help people understand their place in the world, and they're especially capable of doing this "in destitute times," when people feel like they lost their way; poets can act as guides to remind them of a better way to live and deal with nature of the world. "Building Dwelling Thinking" is about how it is fundamental to human nature that human beings attempt to be comfortable in the world that they live in, and they do this through building, creating, and making connections between the natural world and social world, and between mysterious and ordinary aspects of the world--but of course, if they do not respect these different aspects of the world, and become too involved with calculating and measuring, studying the world scientifically, treating people and nature merely as things, and so on, then they lose this comfort; living in the world is, for human beings, learning how to live with these different aspects of the world in harmony. "The Thing" is about what things are, and Heidegger thinks things are whatever appropriately maintain a harmony with the divided aspect of the world: things are objects that fit comfortably for us into the natural and social world, and the mysterious and ordinary world. "Language" is an essay about language, and Heidegger asserts that language helps reveal the hidden nature of things but it is also something that happens to us, not just something we produce; I think what he has in mind something like the way in which whenever we sit quietly thoughts just come to us in language without us forcing them, and then it's up to us how we want to respond. "Poetically Man Dwells" is about how human being's true nature is to be comfortable in the world or, "dwell poetically." Heidegger thinks we can't quite do that because we've somehow lost our way, but we could somehow he regain that ability. I enjoy reading Heidegger as much as the next person, but no doubt some die-hard Heidgger-er will say that I've mischaracterized him in this essay. Quite possibly so. But I did as much as "thinking was up to the task" (using some Heideggerese here). Perhaps someone more knowledgable could tell me what it really means.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Fyza Parviz Jazra

    This book is a collection of lectures and essays of Heidegger (considered later Heidegger) put together by the editor. The theme is to get to the nature/essence of particular phenomena which in this case is art. Heidegger's language is ambiguous. It takes time to understand what he means by "thinging of things," "working of work," "Being of beings" etc., etc. It helped to read slowly and to draw diagrams to understand the connections he formulates between different concepts. His writing becomes This book is a collection of lectures and essays of Heidegger (considered later Heidegger) put together by the editor. The theme is to get to the nature/essence of particular phenomena which in this case is art. Heidegger's language is ambiguous. It takes time to understand what he means by "thinging of things," "working of work," "Being of beings" etc., etc. It helped to read slowly and to draw diagrams to understand the connections he formulates between different concepts. His writing becomes more evident as one keeps on reading. The language almost grows on you till you feel like Heidegger is directly conversing with you and convincing you of his ideas. It was also interesting to learn how much Heidegger was influenced by the poetry of Holderlin and Rilke.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lesliemae

    Intense. It took no less than 2.5 months to read this thin volume of lectures. As a recommendation, do not, as I did not, read this book in order (I heeded the suggestion of another scholar and thank my lucky stars). I think this seemingly disorganized method made all the difference in reading this work. I started with "The Thing" read along with Buddhist thought (namely the Boddhisatva), "Building Dwelling Thinking" along with architectural theory aligned with Heidegger, "...poetically, Man dwe Intense. It took no less than 2.5 months to read this thin volume of lectures. As a recommendation, do not, as I did not, read this book in order (I heeded the suggestion of another scholar and thank my lucky stars). I think this seemingly disorganized method made all the difference in reading this work. I started with "The Thing" read along with Buddhist thought (namely the Boddhisatva), "Building Dwelling Thinking" along with architectural theory aligned with Heidegger, "...poetically, Man dwells...", "What are Poet's For?", "Language", then "The Origin of the Work if Art" with the Stanford Encyclopedia's entry on Heidegger and Aesthetics. After all that I was ready to approach "The Thinker as Poet" with something more than crazy-making confusion. This is my first approach to Heidegger.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ann Michael

    These are challenging essays, especially if you haven't read his tome-like book on thinking and being. I objected deeply to "What Are Poets For?" Heidegger close-reads a Rilke poem in such a way as to prove Heidegger's own philosophical assertions, and it seems ludicrous. Go read Nabokov's Pale Fire instead, and laugh at that sort of attempt. There are some brilliant ideas, here, however. They just need to be read in context with more study of Heidegger. Though it seems logical to collect these th These are challenging essays, especially if you haven't read his tome-like book on thinking and being. I objected deeply to "What Are Poets For?" Heidegger close-reads a Rilke poem in such a way as to prove Heidegger's own philosophical assertions, and it seems ludicrous. Go read Nabokov's Pale Fire instead, and laugh at that sort of attempt. There are some brilliant ideas, here, however. They just need to be read in context with more study of Heidegger. Though it seems logical to collect these thematically-related texts into one book, the system fails to convey what Heidegger's really about. In my opinion.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Marie

    This isn't the kind of book you "finish", but rather one you return to time and again, in its entirety and in portions, but I have now indeed read it to the end for the first time, and shall let that stand as having "finished" it for now. Reading Heidegger is like getting into the sea, an element you have no control over and little understanding of, but which you decide to trust, and in which you allow yourself to bob, cork-like in its big, bosomy waves, catching an occasional toehold of sand or This isn't the kind of book you "finish", but rather one you return to time and again, in its entirety and in portions, but I have now indeed read it to the end for the first time, and shall let that stand as having "finished" it for now. Reading Heidegger is like getting into the sea, an element you have no control over and little understanding of, but which you decide to trust, and in which you allow yourself to bob, cork-like in its big, bosomy waves, catching an occasional toehold of sand or rock, delighted with yourself for daring and frustrated for not daring more.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Osbert

    Heidegger's essay "Language" is the most interesting piece in this collection. The "authentic poetic dimension" of language itself was lauded by Heidegger as a way to attune Man to his authentic sense of Being. This goes against Bertrand Russell's warning against the assumption that language mirrors the structure of the world in his "The Analysis of Mind" (1921). Russell believed it perfectly acceptable to forsake words in order to contemplate facts "more directly through images" (i.e., a pictur Heidegger's essay "Language" is the most interesting piece in this collection. The "authentic poetic dimension" of language itself was lauded by Heidegger as a way to attune Man to his authentic sense of Being. This goes against Bertrand Russell's warning against the assumption that language mirrors the structure of the world in his "The Analysis of Mind" (1921). Russell believed it perfectly acceptable to forsake words in order to contemplate facts "more directly through images" (i.e., a picture theory). Martin Heidegger was looking for an "unconcealing" of reality in which the metaphysical, poetic dimension of human language is used to institute truth (an ecstatic dimension) as opposed to the dry facts that Russell was seeking. Hitherto unconcealed entities are grasped in this conception on their own terms as they disclose various aspects of Being without recourse to external perspectives. This process is undoubtedly closer to mysticism than the language analysis of analytic philosophers.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Heritage

    An absolutely fascinating book early off, it delves into the nature of poetry, language, and thought (shocking given the title). It asks about what art is, what work is, and how art is work, and in what way art exists. Early essays are reminiscent of Being and Time, but the later works are ephemeral and spiritual which lost quite a bit of my interest. As I continue through my Heidegger journey I may come back and reread these to see if I still hold the same opinion.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ben Guterson

    Over my head--plenty of interesting passages, though: "Is the structure of a simple propositional statement (the combination of subject and predicate) the mirror image of the structure of the thing (of the union of substance with accidents)? Or could it be that even the structure of the thing as thus envisaged is a projection of the framework of the sentence?" p. 23

  23. 4 out of 5

    Khashayar Mohammadi

    I loved this book immensely, but I have to admit I was rather disappointed to see that the segments dealing with Poetry, where not about the 'Philosophy OF Poetry', but rather 'Philosophy IN Poetry'

  24. 5 out of 5

    Noah

    "Language is the house of being"

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kate Arms

    This collection of essays on the purpose of art and the relationship between art, language, and thought epitomized through poetry is a dense but fascinating read. Heidegger ultimately argues that the purpose of art is to mark the boundary between things and being. The contemplation of what it is to Be is the defining characteristic of humanity. All things Are but only humans think about what it is or means to Be. According to Heidegger, language is merely utilitarian unless it points to beingness. This collection of essays on the purpose of art and the relationship between art, language, and thought epitomized through poetry is a dense but fascinating read. Heidegger ultimately argues that the purpose of art is to mark the boundary between things and being. The contemplation of what it is to Be is the defining characteristic of humanity. All things Are but only humans think about what it is or means to Be. According to Heidegger, language is merely utilitarian unless it points to beingness. Without illuminating the gap between merely doing things and the awarenss of beingness, language is dead. Language speaks only when it demarks the boundary of the mystery of Being. Because much poetry explicitly uses language to explore existence beyond the literal, it is the epitome of art - dancing in the gap between language and inarticulable consciousness. The essays indicate a spiritual understanding of the profound humanness of consciousness of that which is beyond and engages with some poems in a way that tend to indicate a willingness to accept a literal embodiment of Heaven and Earth that strikes me as contrary to the understanding of the mystery of Being discussed outside the context of the specific poems. Although Heidegger presents himself as a philosopher and a rational thinker, he cannot remain so in the context of this conversation. He is explicitly trying to use language to point out how language is used to illuminate the gap between concrete, objective facts and subjective understandings of the world, amd to do that, he is required to use language in exactly the poetic way he is describing. This is what makes him both so hard to comprehend rationally and so beautiful to read. He is writing poetically on the nature of poetic use of language. As a reader of poetry and a writer and storyteller, there was nothing in these essays that I didn't already know from my experience working with language and art, but it was a pleasure to engage with a serious thinker thinking seriously about these ideas. In the final essay in the collection, he makes an argument that Kindness is foundational for human being and awareness of the world that allows for understanding. Although it is not addressed in this book, this final point about Kindness gets to the heart of the biggest intellectual problem with Heidegger for a modern audience - his anti-Semitic acts and his relationship with Nazism. In Heidegger's thinking, caring is fundamental for knowledge and because human beings are incapable of caring about everything, we cannot help living in a bubble of knowledge surrounded by ignorance.. And, it is clear that in his life, his caring did not encompass politics enough for him to see what we now see about the world he lived in.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Michael Ledezma

    This book transitions incredibly well from Intro to Metaphysics, that I think reading them together in that order is a must. The fourfold, besides just being a bizarre way to characterize different aspects of unconcealment, is made intelligible in light of the four restrictions on Being from intro (although the fourfold DOES NOT coincide with the four restrictions, the meaning of earth,sky,mortals and divinities will become clearer with that particular background) On the origin of the work of ar This book transitions incredibly well from Intro to Metaphysics, that I think reading them together in that order is a must. The fourfold, besides just being a bizarre way to characterize different aspects of unconcealment, is made intelligible in light of the four restrictions on Being from intro (although the fourfold DOES NOT coincide with the four restrictions, the meaning of earth,sky,mortals and divinities will become clearer with that particular background) On the origin of the work of art is an amazing essay. It is brilliant at times, and utterly frustrating in posing unjustified claims at others. Heidegger's view of art is highly unorthodox to say the least, but it does deliver in terms of what it professes to explain. Art is the setting to work of truth in the work as work. Heidegger will explain the difference between thing, equipment, and work, and why all previous characterizations of a thing (bearer of properties, aggregate of matter and form...etc) were inadequate for revealing the workly in the work. Throughout this entire book, truth as aletheia is incredibly important, and this book will do a lot to iron out the general drift of what Heidegger means by the tem. The essay "The Thing" is also awesome, where we learn what it is a thing really is. (does) A thing things, and the locus of its thinging is the clearing in which the fourfold are brought together in their onefold simplicity. Building Dwelling Thinking is probably the best essay in this book. It never lets up on the thrills. It is one of the clearest presentations of Heidegger's counterintuitive approach to describing phenomena, which while being typical for him, are by no means standard fare in philosophy. Space always comes after location. Location is the site of the clearing. In the spaces between locations there unfolds the notion of abstract space. We've basically got to lok at what there is first, as having given rise to abstractions, which we take granted as a priori principles. (This is highly at odds with Kant's transcendental aesthetic, and is on the whole a more naturalistic way of approaching the phenomena IMO- althought there are many parallels between Heidegger and Kant) Language is also a great one. Language speaks. Humans speak only because the speaking of language presupposes it. I was getting an uber Deleuze-through-Delanda vibe in terms of Language being characterized as pure expressivity, of which human speak is just the human way of expressing this expressivity inherent in the unfolding of phusis. Logos is fundamental here, in that it is the gathering gatheredness in every sense, in a cognitive sense, in a linguistic sense, in a phenomenal sense, and in a regulative sense. Epic book! The gleaning of new insights is endless!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Alex Obrigewitsch

    This should not be considered Heidegger's aesthetics. It is a collection of texts which express art's (and particularily poetry's) role in the thinging of things and the worlding of the world - of the eventful appropriation which unfolds and holds together the unity of the fourfold. Poetry and art express the coming to be, the instatement, of the world in truth as unconcealing and taking place. Does this sound like aesthetics? It is the attempt at thinking outside of metaphysics, of which aesthe This should not be considered Heidegger's aesthetics. It is a collection of texts which express art's (and particularily poetry's) role in the thinging of things and the worlding of the world - of the eventful appropriation which unfolds and holds together the unity of the fourfold. Poetry and art express the coming to be, the instatement, of the world in truth as unconcealing and taking place. Does this sound like aesthetics? It is the attempt at thinking outside of metaphysics, of which aesthetics is a part. What is the work of art and what does it do? What is the speaking of language? What is poetry for and what of the poet? These are some of the questions that get folded up into the unfolding of Heidegger's thinking. He shows how the poet, as listener and follower of the divine and of langauge (intertwined in their unforseeable and impossible dimension at the limits of possibility), speaks in response, opening up the space for difference, for the never-yet, to come forth into its own as its own singular being. The unspeakable that Heidegger was oft wont to call Being, before abandoning it hopelessly to metaphysics and its impossibility of speaking the truth of the most eventful simplicity, lingers ever behind all of the writings collected herein. Heidegger is here ever attempting that single thought that he spent his life tracing down the paths of thought. This collection contains some key attempts at formulating a different or other expression of that most simple complexity that withdraws from all speaking. Perhaps most impressive, Heidegger enacts such a responsive thinking whilst also explaining that this responsive speaking is the poet's endevour, through explicating the poem or work at hand and thus letting it speak. Poetry and thinking - speaking the same differently.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Cameron

    I bought this book to discover I'd already read all the essays it contains. But I've learned the only way one can read Heidegger is to constantly re-read Heidegger. So it was no tragedy. Plus, Building, Dwelling, Thinking? That one will never get old for me.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Allan

    I read this collection over the course of about six months, picking it up at varying intervals to read an essay or two when the time felt right. Coming to its conclusion, I think Poetry, Language, Thought is necessary reading for poets, however troubled Heidegger's reputation has become (once again) since the publication of his notebooks. This is, of course, not to make light of antisemitism or the people who espouse it, but without delving into a philosophical argument of many pages, I will say I read this collection over the course of about six months, picking it up at varying intervals to read an essay or two when the time felt right. Coming to its conclusion, I think Poetry, Language, Thought is necessary reading for poets, however troubled Heidegger's reputation has become (once again) since the publication of his notebooks. This is, of course, not to make light of antisemitism or the people who espouse it, but without delving into a philosophical argument of many pages, I will say that I think these texts are more or less safe from the taint of hate. I should also mention that while I think this is necessary reading for poets, it isn't a terribly practical book, and poets shouldn't come to it looking for method. They also should also be wary of mysticism, because I think a few starry-eyed versifiers could read Heidegger almost as a master of the occult. Best to come to these texts with just the right dose of skepticism and generosity, in order to find new ways of seeing, reading, and feeling poems, and the work of a poet. Afterward, we can walk away from these texts with a new appreciation for what we do, but turning back to the muck of this world which Heidegger seemed intent on ignoring.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

    This is a really good survey of Heidegger's later work. I found these to be a lot more eliptical than his earlier, more strictly metaphysicsal stuff, and while that makes them tougher to parse in a certain sense, it gives them a slower, more medatative quality which I really found engaging. The poetic exegisis he provides are some of the best, most dizzying close readings I've come across. If nothing else, they made me actually care about whatever it was that was happening in 19th century romant This is a really good survey of Heidegger's later work. I found these to be a lot more eliptical than his earlier, more strictly metaphysicsal stuff, and while that makes them tougher to parse in a certain sense, it gives them a slower, more medatative quality which I really found engaging. The poetic exegisis he provides are some of the best, most dizzying close readings I've come across. If nothing else, they made me actually care about whatever it was that was happening in 19th century romantic german poetry. As with most of Heidegger's stuff, even when it's enjoyable, it's an uphill battle with the language. The essay on the origin of art is REALLY dense and took me a long time to parse out. But on the same token he somtimes drops the notorious style and throws out a string of super smart observations for a paragraph or two that just leaves your head spinning. After reading the first essay, which is actually a 'poem' he wrote, I think I see why he decided to stick to the dense prose instead.

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