kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

The Untelling (ebook)

Availability: Ready to download

Aria Jackson lived through the car crash that killed her father and brother when she was nine. At 25 she begins to unearth secrets about family, friends, her past, and her altered reality in this journey through truth and forgiveness.


Compare
kode adsense disini

Aria Jackson lived through the car crash that killed her father and brother when she was nine. At 25 she begins to unearth secrets about family, friends, her past, and her altered reality in this journey through truth and forgiveness.

30 review for The Untelling (ebook)

  1. 5 out of 5

    PorshaJo

    Rating 3.75 I read Tayari Jones book An American Marriage and was immediately taken with the writing. I was so drawn into the story and couldn't wait to read more by this author. I decided to grab the audio version of this one and was hooked in the beginning. Again, Jones has a slow moving story, getting into specific details of her characters. In this story, you hear about Aria Jackson. When she was small, she was in a car accident with her family that had devastating, life long effects on her. Rating 3.75 I read Tayari Jones book An American Marriage and was immediately taken with the writing. I was so drawn into the story and couldn't wait to read more by this author. I decided to grab the audio version of this one and was hooked in the beginning. Again, Jones has a slow moving story, getting into specific details of her characters. In this story, you hear about Aria Jackson. When she was small, she was in a car accident with her family that had devastating, life long effects on her. She was so young and had no understanding of what was happening. She was more concerned with the red velvet cake that was smashed in the accident. I was drawn into the story and I did what ever I could to listen to this one. I mean, come one, you have to love a story that quotes Public Enemy! But to me, the story just fell flat the last 1/4 of the book (hence the lower rating). I just wanted more. I listened to this one via audio and the narrator did a great job. Overall, I'm glad I read this one and can't wait to read more by Ms. Jones. I'll be seeing her speak in my city on a literary speaker series and hope to read most of her work by then. I'm looking forward to comparing all of her works.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Raquel

    Okay. So I've had some time to let the effects of having read this book wear off a bit. I feel that I'm ready to talk about it without revealing my soul here. Excuse me if I'm long-winded. This book connected some life-dots for me, so y'all bear with me. I've never read a novel that caused me to do so much self-reflection that I actually had a breakthrough...like a real life breakthrough...like the kind you could get from therapy or something. Actually, I might feel less weird about this whole t Okay. So I've had some time to let the effects of having read this book wear off a bit. I feel that I'm ready to talk about it without revealing my soul here. Excuse me if I'm long-winded. This book connected some life-dots for me, so y'all bear with me. I've never read a novel that caused me to do so much self-reflection that I actually had a breakthrough...like a real life breakthrough...like the kind you could get from therapy or something. Actually, I might feel less weird about this whole thing if I could attribute such a huge life-altering enlightenment to therapy of some kind, but I've never done the therapy thing. Turns out all I needed was a little free time and about 336 pages of awesome fiction. Everybody experiences things differently, so some of you might read, or have already read the book and be like, "what the hhyyell was HomeGirl smokin?'" I believe that every life experience is there to teach us something...every wack azz job, every wack azz family situation, every wack azz male of female who might disturb your peace, even your own wack azz ways...all there to bring lessons. Whether you get the lesson instantly, or 17 years after the fact, as in my case, hopefully you get it some way, at some point and you grow from it. But enough about me... The Untelling is the story of Ariadne (not Adrian, that's not a typo), a southern black girl, born, raised and living in Atlanta. At first she's a little girl, brimming with the typical mind-wonderings and innocence of little girls (those are the best years), then she's a college student at Spellman and a post-graduate working girl dealing with life-long family issues, interesting and emotionally taxing job situations and a relationship with a good man (whom she seems to feel undeserving of) among other, way more serious things. I'm trying not to spoil the experience for any would-be readers, but if y'all want more details about what happens in the story, you can find it <>. Up to the very end of the book, the layers of each character are still being pulled back revealing more and explaining more about why they are the way they are. The character the reader might be inclined to hate, becomes sympathetic and quite impossible to have anything other than pity and hope for. Digression: I think there's a quote or something that says, "hate cannot exist where there is knowledge and understanding" or something like that. I totally get that--it's so easy to see someone as a bitch or a bastard or a creep until you learn and understand what unfortunate background or unlucky choices or experiences made them that way. Bitch, bastard or creep they may be, but at least if you understand the root of the wackness, it'd be pretty difficult to have ill feelings towards them. I've always felt that way. The meaning behind the title, The Untelling, is explained in a narrative by Ariadne at the end. I always look forward to mentions of the title in books I read. "The Untelling" is such an interesting phrase. Before Ariadne's narrative at the end, I felt like maybe Tayari titled the novel The Untelling because the whole back story is not told up front. By the end of the novel when every character has been fully revealed, it's like 'Oooh! Ok. That's what happened, now it all makes sense.' It's like the full story was told backwards. That's a huge part of what made this read so enjoyable. Tayari Jone's first novel, Leaving Atlanta, is SO on my list.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Book Concierge

    Ariadne is nine years old when the family is in an automobile accident on the way to her dance recital. Her father and baby sister, Genevieve, die. Aria, her older sister, Hermione, and their mother survive. But all three carry serious emotional scars from the event. Now it is sixteen years later and they are living independent lives. Hermione is married and the mother of a toddler, living in the suburbs and almost never returns Aria’s phone calls. Their mother is a bitter woman, who uses her el Ariadne is nine years old when the family is in an automobile accident on the way to her dance recital. Her father and baby sister, Genevieve, die. Aria, her older sister, Hermione, and their mother survive. But all three carry serious emotional scars from the event. Now it is sixteen years later and they are living independent lives. Hermione is married and the mother of a toddler, living in the suburbs and almost never returns Aria’s phone calls. Their mother is a bitter woman, who uses her elegant attire as armor against emotional contact. Aria, having graduated from Spellman College, lives in a not-quite-gentrified neighborhood in central Atlanta and works at a nonprofit Literacy Center. The one thing they have in common is that none will talk about their guilt and regrets, their hopes and their dreams. This is the second book I’ve read by Jones, and I continue to be impressed by her writing. She really explores her characters, slowly letting the reader get to know these women. Aria narrates and that does give us a skewed perspective of her mother and sister, as well as best friend Rochelle, boyfriend Dwayne and other characters in the book. She is forever expecting things to turn out badly, and she is sometimes proven right. But she fails to see how she influences the outcome. An unexpected diagnosis is the catalyst for Aria’s finally coming to terms with her loss and facing her present and future. I am different now; today nothing scares me more than the hollow clatter of secrets.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Hafidha

    Heard about Tayari Jones from a few online friends, and picked up this book because I wanted to read some contemporary fiction by a black woman writer who is about my age (30s). I read up to page 36 or so and then put it down; the beginning was compelling, but I stopped at a point in which it was unclear what was going to happen next. I sat myself down with it about a week later and read the remaining 300 pages over the next 24 hours. Plot-wise, things move slowly and there are a lot of flashbac Heard about Tayari Jones from a few online friends, and picked up this book because I wanted to read some contemporary fiction by a black woman writer who is about my age (30s). I read up to page 36 or so and then put it down; the beginning was compelling, but I stopped at a point in which it was unclear what was going to happen next. I sat myself down with it about a week later and read the remaining 300 pages over the next 24 hours. Plot-wise, things move slowly and there are a lot of flashbacks. But the character arcs - especially that of the main character, Aria aka Ariadne aka "Penny," - are done beautifully. I haven't been this interested in characters and their relationships in a contemporary novel in a very long time. Jones also does a great job of situating her characters in a very particular place (black neighborhoods in Atlanta) over several decades. Other notable things: the dialogue, and the emotional impact - several times I had to put this book down and catch my breath; some of the passages are truly haunting. I loved this book and am looking forward to seeing Ms. Jones in June when she stops in Seattle as part of her third novel's book tour.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Desiree

    I really, really wanted to like this book. I recently saw the author speak and I really liked her. The story had so much potential but it just fell painfully short. The over use of metaphors almost killed me like a snake slowly squeezes the life out of a mouse. See what I did there?

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Weathersby

    I have now read three sad books by Tayari Jones, Silver Sparrow, An American Marriage, and now the Untelling. The first two books were "troublesome," in leaving many threads unraveled. I just finished this book that left me in tears. How does it happen that the love and marriage can become unraveled? The backdrop for this book is the Spelman girls, growing up in Atlanta, in houses left-over in the neighborhoods run-down by students who didn't have the resources to keep them up. Their mother gave I have now read three sad books by Tayari Jones, Silver Sparrow, An American Marriage, and now the Untelling. The first two books were "troublesome," in leaving many threads unraveled. I just finished this book that left me in tears. How does it happen that the love and marriage can become unraveled? The backdrop for this book is the Spelman girls, growing up in Atlanta, in houses left-over in the neighborhoods run-down by students who didn't have the resources to keep them up. Their mother gave them Greek names, Ariadne (who called herself Aria), Hermione, Genevieve. Aria's boyfriend Dwayne was ready to marry her, but somehow everything came unraveled, when there was no baby. I had to finish crying before I could write this review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    The Untelling is a story of lies--lies of omission and lies meant to mislead, lies told to others and told to ourselves. The truth is a hard nut to crack sometimes, but there are always consequences. Damaged by a childhood tragedy that overshadows the rest of her life, protagonist Aria backs herself into corners that have predictable results for the plot. That's not to say the book was boring or not compelling, but it's fairly obvious the way events will play out. Getting there is worth it, thou The Untelling is a story of lies--lies of omission and lies meant to mislead, lies told to others and told to ourselves. The truth is a hard nut to crack sometimes, but there are always consequences. Damaged by a childhood tragedy that overshadows the rest of her life, protagonist Aria backs herself into corners that have predictable results for the plot. That's not to say the book was boring or not compelling, but it's fairly obvious the way events will play out. Getting there is worth it, though, as Jones writes with such skill. Jones has a gift for creating true-to-life characters. They were sometimes hard for me to like, especially Aria, who seems almost unhinged and pathological, particularly in the early chapters of the book, but they are real. She paints the scene vividly, where Aria is stuck between two competing worlds. It's not a happy book, you get the feeling that even those characters who make it out intact are living in some sort of futile, hollow world, but as Aria finally acknowledges the truths behind her many losses, it is something of a victory.

  8. 5 out of 5

    René

    I liked it, but not as much as Leaving Atlanta (which was very good) or Silver Sparrow (which I LOVED). The story wasn't what I initially thought it would be--for some reason by the description on the inside front jacket I thought it would be more of a trauma narrative. There is trauma in the novel, but the story moves slower so there's less emotional impact (at least, until the end) than most stories of past trauma. Instead, this book was more of a character study of a young woman. Jones took h I liked it, but not as much as Leaving Atlanta (which was very good) or Silver Sparrow (which I LOVED). The story wasn't what I initially thought it would be--for some reason by the description on the inside front jacket I thought it would be more of a trauma narrative. There is trauma in the novel, but the story moves slower so there's less emotional impact (at least, until the end) than most stories of past trauma. Instead, this book was more of a character study of a young woman. Jones took her time in developing the main character in this story. It is well written and I would still recommend it, even if I rate it less than I did Jones's other 2 novels. There's no doubt that Jones is a fine chronicler of the complexity of emotion. There's an honesty about her writing, a vulnerability she gives to all her characters, that I find sorely lacking in so many other writers' work. I look forward to her future work. She is one of my favorite writers that I have come across in the last few years.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Titilayo

    i really got caught up in this story. the hints towards the secret that needs to be told (or untold)set you up for the sesmic boom at the end. loved it.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Akilah

    This is honestly one of the best books I've ever read about a person who doesn't think she deserves to be happy.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Isis Smith

    i have only read 2 of her novels--this is the second--but i can safely call myself a tayari jones fan. hers is the type of voice i looked for when i stayed in the "african-american fiction" section of borders' book store; what i still look for in the library books that have the lil red, yellow, & green sticker in the shape of africa on the spine. i appreciate this narrative that is observant, resonant, poetic and yet lacking in pretense. i liked that the plot elements all seemed realistic an i have only read 2 of her novels--this is the second--but i can safely call myself a tayari jones fan. hers is the type of voice i looked for when i stayed in the "african-american fiction" section of borders' book store; what i still look for in the library books that have the lil red, yellow, & green sticker in the shape of africa on the spine. i appreciate this narrative that is observant, resonant, poetic and yet lacking in pretense. i liked that the plot elements all seemed realistic and the consequences, logical. so many times, even in what is considered "literary" african-american fiction, the plot falls prey to the types of melodramatic plot twists one would expect from a soap opera or tyler perry movie. that didn't happen here, and for that, i am glad. i loved a protagonist i could relate to--a youngish, educated african-american woman from what many would call a "good" family. on a deeper level, i think many african-american women can relate to having our worth/value be determined by our physicality, desirability, and ability to get and keep a man. reading this novel me reminded me of when i, like the protagonist, went to a prestigious university, believing a romantic relationship would ground my future far more than the education i would receive. like the protagonist, i was overlooked and disappointed, and later found myself in relationships with men who could not fully appreciate me. i won't give any more spoilers but jones covers a lot of ground, and i'm grateful to find an african-american author who etches these types of experiences--experiences i can relate to--onto the literary landscape, in a voice that engages and encourages introspection.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jamilla Rice

    I really wanted to give it 2.5 stars, but the bloody rating system rounds off. It's like when you're an 8 1/2 and all of the shoes you like only come in whole sizes. Anyway, I didn't like this one as much as Leaving Atlanta or Silver Sparrow. The depth of Atlanta's point of view and the richness of Sparrow's characters, story, and imagery were just not present. There are glimpses of the much more lyrical and visual Jones toward the end of the book, which I respect much more than the rest of the I really wanted to give it 2.5 stars, but the bloody rating system rounds off. It's like when you're an 8 1/2 and all of the shoes you like only come in whole sizes. Anyway, I didn't like this one as much as Leaving Atlanta or Silver Sparrow. The depth of Atlanta's point of view and the richness of Sparrow's characters, story, and imagery were just not present. There are glimpses of the much more lyrical and visual Jones toward the end of the book, which I respect much more than the rest of the novel, but things seem too trite and forced throughout this novel. It was a little tedious, like the last lap in the pool when you just want to go home and sleep. You push it out not even because it'll make you stronger or healthier. You do it because you don't want to leave it unfinished. And so it was.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Monique

    I liked The Untelling but didn’t love it, like I did Jones’ Silver Sparrow. The book tells the story of a family who experiences great tragedy early on and the secrets they harbor and how it effects them throughout the years and into current day. I was expecting something a little more, but still a good read.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ann

    A wonderful story of loss, coping, understanding ones own actions or failure to act. A telling to help heal one's past... Tayari is a truly talented storyteller. Her characters are so real and their challenges and life experiences are familiar and believable. I didn't want to stop reading and wanted more when it ended. I highly recommend this novel.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Breena

    Tayari Jones once again takes her reader to Atlanta for an insider's view of an African American family who've suffered loss through an automobile accident. Aria and her sister navigate their own grief and their mother's destructive grieving. The Untelllng is a nuanced, complex depiction of the econmic stratification of Black Atlanta and is a good tale nicely told.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Audra

    A raw, honest look at the complexities of relationships and how hiding our hurts from friends and loved ones only causes more hurt and misunderstandings. Masterful use of imagery. I read it in one sitting!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jan

    Poetic narrative of a young woman facing the losses of her past along with those of her future. A sensitive portrayal of a contemporary woman facing issues of love and family making in the context of race, class, and urban life.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ransom

    it was a little slow for me and not very inviting but i listened to it fully.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Indya

    Enjoyed! It was a little slow at times but recommended by John Green. Good read

  20. 5 out of 5

    Allison

    Heartbreaking in the read of how childhood trauma can stick with us and what we internalize and how our reality, our version of what happened, can be so individual. What changes when we share our stories?

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lois

    I really liked this somewhat slow character study. I love Jones writing style I get so invested in the characters.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Arlene Whitlock

    I picked this up because Jones’ most recent book, An American Marriage, isn’t available at the local libraries here. It’s checked out to 20+ people. So, I am awaiting ‘my turn’. As other reviewers have indicated I kept looking for hints to why the book was called The Untelling. To me, it’s a metaphorical way of saying Revealing the Truth. Certainly the main character is mired, not only in her secrets(she needs to tell her fiancé the truth about something that could potentially jeopardize their m I picked this up because Jones’ most recent book, An American Marriage, isn’t available at the local libraries here. It’s checked out to 20+ people. So, I am awaiting ‘my turn’. As other reviewers have indicated I kept looking for hints to why the book was called The Untelling. To me, it’s a metaphorical way of saying Revealing the Truth. Certainly the main character is mired, not only in her secrets(she needs to tell her fiancé the truth about something that could potentially jeopardize their marriage plans), but the secrets of her immediate family. The main character, Ariadne, survives a car accident in which her father and infant sister dies. Secrets abound surrounding this as does the lingering affects of grief and the upending of a family used to living a certain way. This is a powerful story with a universal theme. That is, all families have secrets. Children often are not told certain secrets because families determine early on that it’s ‘best’ they do not know. However, sometimes these ‘tellings’ or lies or things not said shape personality, character, resilience and self-esteem. These things ultimately affect adult relationships. It is a sad ending, but it has a silver lining. Ariadne now understands who she is and why she behaves the way she does. In other words, she begins the journey toward healing.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Taryn Pierson

    I found this book via YA author John Green, who with his brother posts short videos covering a variety of subjects on YouTube. Recently he posted a video in which he lists great books that most people haven't heard of. This is just the kind of golden opportunity I'm always on the lookout for, so I quickly made a note of the titles I wanted to check out. Tayari Jones's The Untelling is the first one I was able to get my hands on. Green points out that Jones is better known for another novel, Leavi I found this book via YA author John Green, who with his brother posts short videos covering a variety of subjects on YouTube. Recently he posted a video in which he lists great books that most people haven't heard of. This is just the kind of golden opportunity I'm always on the lookout for, so I quickly made a note of the titles I wanted to check out. Tayari Jones's The Untelling is the first one I was able to get my hands on. Green points out that Jones is better known for another novel, Leaving Atlanta, but his claim is that sometimes authors' more obscure titles are just as good, and I have to agree with him. The Untelling is haunting and sad, but beautifully written. Narrator Ariadne has been deeply scarred by a childhood tragedy: her father and baby sister were killed one day when the family car hit a magnolia tree. Aria and her remaining family members all suffer their grief in different ways. Her mother becomes erratic and accusatory, locking Aria and her sister Hermione out of the house and calling them sluts. Hermione leaves as soon as she can, marrying a much older man when she is only 18. Aria deals with her guilt by burying it, keeping it hidden from everyone who is important to her. Aria is now 25 and living with her best friend Rochelle in a run-down neighborhood in Atlanta. They teach literacy classes at a nonprofit. Aria has a comfortable, solid relationship with her boyfriend Dwayne. All that is about to be disrupted, though, when Aria learns a shattering truth about herself and reverts to her old secret-keeping method of coping. Eventually she comes to realize that telling her secrets might actually be the only way to protect herself and salvage her relationships. For the full text of this recommendation and many others, please visit www.readingwithhippos.com

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ginger

    This is my second Tayari Jones but definitely not my last. I read Silver Sparrow a few years ago and I still think about it and compare it to other books. The Untelling is similar in that it focuses on a family, a really screwed up family at that. The blurb will tell you it's about a woman unearthing family secrets but that is a bit misleading. It's really about this woman learning to live with her screwed up past. Then at the end, you find out why she's so screwed up when some a secret comes out This is my second Tayari Jones but definitely not my last. I read Silver Sparrow a few years ago and I still think about it and compare it to other books. The Untelling is similar in that it focuses on a family, a really screwed up family at that. The blurb will tell you it's about a woman unearthing family secrets but that is a bit misleading. It's really about this woman learning to live with her screwed up past. Then at the end, you find out why she's so screwed up when some a secret comes out. Aria is 25 and living with all the junk that is the aftermath of a family tragedy. Somehow Jones manages to write a book without a likable person in it that you want to read. I said the same thing about Silver Sparrow. These aren't just cookie-cutter sweet people without flaws. These are real people dealing with real stuff sometimes it messy, often it's ugly it almost never likable. Tayari Jones crafts a compelling, interesting book about flawed people that you want to keep reading. I am accidently reading Jones books in reverse order. Leaving Atlanta should be next but that's her last novel for me (it's actually her debut novel) so I might wait a while to read it. This is the problem when you find an author you love that only has a few books. You want to read everything but then you'll be done. Read Tayari Jones people you won't be disappointed!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    I liked The Untelling by Tayari Jones. Ariadne lost her father and baby sister in a car accident when she was 10. Her mother is unstable and cold toward Ariadne and her older sister afterward. Her sister, who has been a refuge for Ariadne, escapes the household by marrying her father's friend. All Ariadne wants is a normal family, and she thinks that's what she'll be getting when she tells her boyfriend that she is expecting his baby and he offers to marry her. This is a beautifully written book I liked The Untelling by Tayari Jones. Ariadne lost her father and baby sister in a car accident when she was 10. Her mother is unstable and cold toward Ariadne and her older sister afterward. Her sister, who has been a refuge for Ariadne, escapes the household by marrying her father's friend. All Ariadne wants is a normal family, and she thinks that's what she'll be getting when she tells her boyfriend that she is expecting his baby and he offers to marry her. This is a beautifully written book, describing Ariadne's complicated relationships with her best friend from college, a pregnant teenage student in the literacy program Ariadne teaches, her boyfriend, and her mother and sister. She compares her background from a middle class black family with her roommate's wealthier upbringing and the circumstances of her poor students and the crack addicts that inhabit the transitional neighborhood where Ariadne lives. Her sense of being set apart by the sad circumstance of the accident that claimed her father and sister's lives is heart-breaking. She's a character that you want to see succeed and hope the best for. I listened to the audiobook, and I really enjoyed the reader.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Authorjen

    I wanted to like this book so much more than I did — probably because I really, really liked both An American Marriage and Silver Sparrow. While the writing, of course, is wonderful, I found the story to be flat and the characters unrelateable. The story never felt like it developed for me, it was just a string of incomplete anecdotes that eventually ended. I appreciate the nice little wrap up at the end, but I felt like it ended before it really began. So, if you loved this book, you'll REALLY I wanted to like this book so much more than I did — probably because I really, really liked both An American Marriage and Silver Sparrow. While the writing, of course, is wonderful, I found the story to be flat and the characters unrelateable. The story never felt like it developed for me, it was just a string of incomplete anecdotes that eventually ended. I appreciate the nice little wrap up at the end, but I felt like it ended before it really began. So, if you loved this book, you'll REALLY love Ms. Jones' other books (mentioned above). If you really loved her other books, this one may not do it for you. I guess my expectations were just too high.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    Aria's life has been full of tragedy for as long as she can remember. As a child, she survived a car accident that claimed the lives of her father and her baby sister. As her father was trying to talk to her, she plugged her ears and pretended she couldn't hear him as he passed away... A resident of Atlanta, Aria has dedicated her life to teach literacy to girls who may not otherwise gain an education. She lives in a rough part of town with her best friend Rochelle, which troubles her boyfriend D Aria's life has been full of tragedy for as long as she can remember. As a child, she survived a car accident that claimed the lives of her father and her baby sister. As her father was trying to talk to her, she plugged her ears and pretended she couldn't hear him as he passed away... A resident of Atlanta, Aria has dedicated her life to teach literacy to girls who may not otherwise gain an education. She lives in a rough part of town with her best friend Rochelle, which troubles her boyfriend Dwayne. Aria has worked hard to build a stable life for herself that she can be proud of. But now she has a secret that she's not ready to share with anyone: she is pregnant. Maybe. So begins the twists and turns that occur as Aria discovers if she will be a mother, but more importantly, who she really is.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Appleton

    I read this on a recommendation from Author John Green from his Vlog Brothers entry “18 Great Books You Probably Haven't Read”. I listened to this rather than read it since my library only had it in audio form. This may have added to part of my detachment from it. There is a lot of introspection here and a lot of what emotional battlefields we all have and create in our lives. Some of our fiercest opposition comes from inside. This book does a phenomenal job of getting into the emotional states of I read this on a recommendation from Author John Green from his Vlog Brothers entry “18 Great Books You Probably Haven't Read”. I listened to this rather than read it since my library only had it in audio form. This may have added to part of my detachment from it. There is a lot of introspection here and a lot of what emotional battlefields we all have and create in our lives. Some of our fiercest opposition comes from inside. This book does a phenomenal job of getting into the emotional states of the protagonist, and what memories and events shape her life. Unfortunately I didn’t really identify with her as well as I would have liked to. This is not the best one on the list, but certainly not the worst.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Maria

    I struggled to rate this book... because the characters are fantastically created, there’s depth, layers, realness they’re three dimensional. if anything, Tayari Jones can write up great, real, raw characters. However the book itself was a little plotless I felt, the premise of the story had so much potential... unfortunately unfulfilled. And overall it just depressed me. It’s a depressing book to be honest. So although I will consider reading an American marriage which has been highly praised, I struggled to rate this book... because the characters are fantastically created, there’s depth, layers, realness they’re three dimensional. if anything, Tayari Jones can write up great, real, raw characters. However the book itself was a little plotless I felt, the premise of the story had so much potential... unfortunately unfulfilled. And overall it just depressed me. It’s a depressing book to be honest. So although I will consider reading an American marriage which has been highly praised, I have very lukewarm feelings for this book in particular.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Karalyn

    This is a story about a girl who is angry with her lot in life and kept living in the past and was afraid of it. I felt like there was no real point to this story just a girl telling her story and going on and on. Looking at all the reviews on this book (which are very positive) I guess I missed something because I just did not get this book.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.