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Best eBook On How To Be An Ultimate Sales Machine - Sales Machine: Step Into The Mind Of The Secret Of Sales Machine

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“Step Into The Mind Of The Ultimate Sales Machine As He Exposes Closely-Guarded Secrets to Boosting Your Profits And Catapulting Your Bottom Line!” The Corporate Trainer For NBC, Citibank, Warner Bros, GNC, Wells Fargo, Estee’ Lauder, Merrill Lynch, And Almost a THOUSAND Other Companies Spills The Beans On How To Put Your Company On A Path To Success…And Help It STAY There! “Step Into The Mind Of The Ultimate Sales Machine As He Exposes Closely-Guarded Secrets to Boosting Your Profits And Catapulting Your Bottom Line!” The Corporate Trainer For NBC, Citibank, Warner Bros, GNC, Wells Fargo, Estee’ Lauder, Merrill Lynch, And Almost a THOUSAND Other Companies Spills The Beans On How To Put Your Company On A Path To Success…And Help It STAY There! “Confessions of the Ultimate Sales Machine” is a shortcut to business and sales success. Chet Holmes bottles up 19 years of sales experience and trials and errors he discovered training top companies into a single 1-hour audio. You won’t find this material behind the “ivory tower” of universities. And those ‘so called’ business building books you see at Barnes and Noble totally miss the boat when it comes to this solid business advice. Believe me, there’s no hype or theory here. This is the ticket you need to get your business up and running in no time. And, once you GET it going…this will give you the blueprint for keeping it there! This is huge. Very huge. Why? Because you’ll get an upper hand over your competitors who have absolutely NO plan, don’t know how to organize, and are just running around aimlessly—hoping what they’re doing is right. In fact, I’m going to go a step further and say: You HAVE To Know This Critical Material If You’re Running An Internet Business (Or ANY Business for That Matter…)!!!


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“Step Into The Mind Of The Ultimate Sales Machine As He Exposes Closely-Guarded Secrets to Boosting Your Profits And Catapulting Your Bottom Line!” The Corporate Trainer For NBC, Citibank, Warner Bros, GNC, Wells Fargo, Estee’ Lauder, Merrill Lynch, And Almost a THOUSAND Other Companies Spills The Beans On How To Put Your Company On A Path To Success…And Help It STAY There! “Step Into The Mind Of The Ultimate Sales Machine As He Exposes Closely-Guarded Secrets to Boosting Your Profits And Catapulting Your Bottom Line!” The Corporate Trainer For NBC, Citibank, Warner Bros, GNC, Wells Fargo, Estee’ Lauder, Merrill Lynch, And Almost a THOUSAND Other Companies Spills The Beans On How To Put Your Company On A Path To Success…And Help It STAY There! “Confessions of the Ultimate Sales Machine” is a shortcut to business and sales success. Chet Holmes bottles up 19 years of sales experience and trials and errors he discovered training top companies into a single 1-hour audio. You won’t find this material behind the “ivory tower” of universities. And those ‘so called’ business building books you see at Barnes and Noble totally miss the boat when it comes to this solid business advice. Believe me, there’s no hype or theory here. This is the ticket you need to get your business up and running in no time. And, once you GET it going…this will give you the blueprint for keeping it there! This is huge. Very huge. Why? Because you’ll get an upper hand over your competitors who have absolutely NO plan, don’t know how to organize, and are just running around aimlessly—hoping what they’re doing is right. In fact, I’m going to go a step further and say: You HAVE To Know This Critical Material If You’re Running An Internet Business (Or ANY Business for That Matter…)!!!

30 review for Best eBook On How To Be An Ultimate Sales Machine - Sales Machine: Step Into The Mind Of The Secret Of Sales Machine

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. One of the best business books I've ever read. One of those books that captures the whole picture. Right there with Go It Alone. try this RAS recording shit. My method of learning from my books is not good enough. I remember thinking that this book was awesome. I can't remember anything important from it. My circling quotes is not capturing what really matters. The essence of the book isn't in the quotes. I need a system of note taking. Someway to refresh myself on the important outline elements o One of the best business books I've ever read. One of those books that captures the whole picture. Right there with Go It Alone. try this RAS recording shit. My method of learning from my books is not good enough. I remember thinking that this book was awesome. I can't remember anything important from it. My circling quotes is not capturing what really matters. The essence of the book isn't in the quotes. I need a system of note taking. Someway to refresh myself on the important outline elements of the book. Not just memorable quotes. Quotes: "I realized that becoming a master of karate was not about learning 4,000 moves but about doing just a handful of moves 4,000 times." "Implementation, not ideas, is the key to real success." "The first thing you do to anyone who applies for a job in your company is to reject them, telling them why you don't think they can do the job. It's not that you don't want to hire the person. It's that you're looking for the unique personality profile that becomes more effective in the face of adversity." "I know other trainers say to thank prospects for their time, but I do not agree with that philosophy. This shows that you consider their time more valuable than yours. It also suggests to them that listening to you is far less important than other things they could be doing. It belittles everything you have to say. Never apologize or thank them for their time. If you do a good job, then they will thank you." "Remember to keep a tone of authority. That keeps assistants off-guard. They don't know if they have any power over you yet. The minute you start sounding like a salesperson, you give them that power and they will wield it well. You must keep them off-balance." "Sales Steps: 1. Establish Rapport 2. Qualify the Buyer (Find the Need) 3. Build Value 4. Create Desire 5. Overcome Objections (Notice the parallels here with the Game. They just took well understood sales techniques and repackaged them.)" "Once you have shown them the problems, paint the pictures of their wonderful future with your products or services and you will create desire. Just be sure you are painting a picture of their future and not just your products. Remember that features tell, benefits sell. Don't tell them what it is, but rather why they need it." "Attitude is the only thing we can control in life, yet it's also the most powerful. You can't control your spouse, your kids, the weather, your coworkers, or the economy. You can try to better understand each of them, but you can't control them. All you can control is your perception and your attitude."

  2. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    This book provides a decent overview of sales, with a lot of examples from a successful salesperson. As a forewarning, a large part of my brain is probably devoted to ignoring advertisements and spam, so I have a lot of negative opinions about many sales techniques. Review of Sales Techniques Numerous methods and types of sales are discussed, with strategies explained. I have no doubt most businesses would find one or more strategies they haven't thought of. Personally, I reject about half of the This book provides a decent overview of sales, with a lot of examples from a successful salesperson. As a forewarning, a large part of my brain is probably devoted to ignoring advertisements and spam, so I have a lot of negative opinions about many sales techniques. Review of Sales Techniques Numerous methods and types of sales are discussed, with strategies explained. I have no doubt most businesses would find one or more strategies they haven't thought of. Personally, I reject about half of the strategies for my own business as they involve what I categorize as spam and stalking. Basically, I find methods of advertising to huge numbers people obnoxious if the information wasn't solicited, searched for, or professionally relevant. Am I losing business because of this? Yes. Am I wasting thousands of people's time with their own inboxes, telephones, and computers to obtain one client? No. My guess is this author has probably wasted the equivalent of ten human lifetimes in the amount of time he's made people think about his products and services. With that being said, a lot of the ideas are useful suggestions for finding ways to sell products or services, or to enhance an existing businesses sales model. I will personally use a lot of the general ideas to improve both mine and my clients advertising and sales gateways, and use them in a way to respect people's time. Unrealistic Numbers Another problem I had with the information presented is the same type of problem I have when viewing misleading advertisements. The author was a highly successful salesperson whose sales were for large businesses with huge product investments. Because of this, the example pricing and numbers given were understandably large. However, the way the information was presented mixed these numbers as if to imply regular and small businesses were able to easily achieve such numbers. At one point, he even suggested using the best case scenarios for advertising income. Work for this joker and earn $100,000, like one person out of a thousand did one year after a very rare corporate sale. Basically, using the earning from the best out of a thousand or even hundred thousand to lead people astray, without explaining the specific case is very unlikely. I am not sure if this was suggested to use in product or service advertisements, as the example was a salesperson to salesperson employment advertisement. From experience, I've learned that following up with advertisements like this lead me to pushy salespeople who have devised other half-truths and lies they aren't willing to put in writing. What I am paying for won't be product or service research, but to be robbed and bamboozled. Great Educational Marketing Advice In all fairness, the category on educational marketing had some great advice. Businesses that market with great information and studies are the types of businesses I usually find and eventually use. Television, Radio, Billboard, and Newspaper Advertising Great advice on some ways to format advertisements for these mediums. Although I personally ignore most advertisements, when being entertained, I do find some ads humorous or interesting as a consumer at times. Website Advertising His descriptions of a website and his model were decent. He described a main site, with free articles, and compared it with a web site with one feature, a sign-up box. He mentioned more people filled out the sign-up box on the website without other information, but the article website had more traffic. Interesting to note, although I'd never design a website with only an email sign-up box and product offering. I think it would be very ineffective for anyone but a person who already has a large following. One benefit of a website is to bring in unknown people and provide unique information and services, and perhaps sell stuff also. Website technology isn't designed only to force people sent there to sign up for a constant barrage of a salespersons spam. Telemarketing An entire section was the author bragging about how he would repeatedly call and harass tons of people on the phone, and get a few responses and sales. He had a full methodology on mind controlling secretaries over the phone to have them go back and forth to talk to their bosses. For those in the United States who don't want to be called by salespeople, register at the following to make it illegal for all but researchers and charities to call you: https://www.donotcall.gov/

  3. 4 out of 5

    Maura

    Some useful ideas for those of us who aren't in sales. My biggest takeaways: *dedicate 1 hour per week on areas that need improvement that otherwise wouldn't get attention *When pitching, always put things in terms of the customer's benefit/point if view, not you or your product's advantages *Don't waffle when trying to make a sale. A great example was a real estate agent who told a couple about to buy their first house something like "Now buying a house is a big decision and shouldn't be rushed in Some useful ideas for those of us who aren't in sales. My biggest takeaways: *dedicate 1 hour per week on areas that need improvement that otherwise wouldn't get attention *When pitching, always put things in terms of the customer's benefit/point if view, not you or your product's advantages *Don't waffle when trying to make a sale. A great example was a real estate agent who told a couple about to buy their first house something like "Now buying a house is a big decision and shouldn't be rushed into..." *Measure effectiveness (people respect what you inspect) *Don't engage in self-talk like "I can't ...", "I'm no good at ..." because your mind can't always distinguish thoughts from truth and eventually you'll start believing yourself

  4. 4 out of 5

    Roberto Jorda-Cid

    Best business book ive read in a long time. This is the type of book that gets you thinking, pumped, and read to take action all at once. No one has the ability Chet Holmes has to make this information be relevant and also help guide you to take action. This is a book I will re-read as many times until it becomes second nature. The tips, the exercise, and the stories that are intertwined throughout the reading make this a great experience and tool for anyone creating a business, works in sales, Best business book ive read in a long time. This is the type of book that gets you thinking, pumped, and read to take action all at once. No one has the ability Chet Holmes has to make this information be relevant and also help guide you to take action. This is a book I will re-read as many times until it becomes second nature. The tips, the exercise, and the stories that are intertwined throughout the reading make this a great experience and tool for anyone creating a business, works in sales, or wants to know about creative marketing.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Dustan Woodhouse

    Re-read this book every 30 days for a year, maybe two years, and if you are not at the top of the game then it is time to find a new game.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    I promise that this will be the first and last sales book I add to my list. The books author, Chet Holmes, claims to be "Americas greatest sales and marketing executive". That may or may not be the case. Regardless, he does not lack hubris. Just ask him who's the best. Anyway, Chet has developed "12 skill areas" that will help anyone sell stuff better than they ever have before! For our reading convienience he's broken down the 12 skill areas into 12 chapters! You will only need to read these 12 I promise that this will be the first and last sales book I add to my list. The books author, Chet Holmes, claims to be "Americas greatest sales and marketing executive". That may or may not be the case. Regardless, he does not lack hubris. Just ask him who's the best. Anyway, Chet has developed "12 skill areas" that will help anyone sell stuff better than they ever have before! For our reading convienience he's broken down the 12 skill areas into 12 chapters! You will only need to read these 12 chapters to become a, ahem, "master" (read: top flight sales honk). So do I feel like I learned anything from this book having read (literally) dozens of sales books before this? Verily nay, I don't think so. The true test of my Masterful abilities will be tested when I try to sell my wife on the idea that I need a new Mercedes-Benz S500 AMG. If you see me driving this car around remind me to change my 2 star rating to 5. I have no problem giving credit where it's due. Until then, 2 stars in more than enough.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Bart Van Loon

    Okay, it's another American book on business and this one is perhaps even more `American' than all the others. Everything is repeated, data is served in very small chunks, the author is shamelessly self-promoting on every single page, etc... BUT I do believe the content of this book and the learning you get from it are extremely useful to increase your company sales productivity. I also liked the link the author makes between business and life. Success in either one basically requires a very simil Okay, it's another American book on business and this one is perhaps even more `American' than all the others. Everything is repeated, data is served in very small chunks, the author is shamelessly self-promoting on every single page, etc... BUT I do believe the content of this book and the learning you get from it are extremely useful to increase your company sales productivity. I also liked the link the author makes between business and life. Success in either one basically requires a very similar set of skills. The Ultimate Sales Machine is a very practical book with exercises, examples, simply laid out strategies and tactics. The key learning, which I love, however, is not do-this-and-do-that but that `pigheaded discipline and determination' will bring you everywhere you want. And that's a great thought for (business) people to understand.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Chad Warner

    A world-class marketer and salesman reveals the strategies and tactics behind his success. The material is explained well, with plenty of examples. I found some of the approaches a bit slimy. He says don't lie, but don't tell the whole truth. He advocates leading prospects on, which I find disingenuous. For example, he says you should tell prospects, "We're in touch with your competitors" to imply that you're working with them, when you're really just marketing to them. I don't deny his success A world-class marketer and salesman reveals the strategies and tactics behind his success. The material is explained well, with plenty of examples. I found some of the approaches a bit slimy. He says don't lie, but don't tell the whole truth. He advocates leading prospects on, which I find disingenuous. For example, he says you should tell prospects, "We're in touch with your competitors" to imply that you're working with them, when you're really just marketing to them. I don't deny his success or the effectiveness of the techniques, I just don't like that approach to sales. A major point is that the key to success is pig-headed discipline and determination (powering through implementation, despite short-term disappointment). I read this looking for ideas to improve my sales skills in my web agency, OptimWise. I had heard of this book a few times, and finally decided to read it when it was recommended in the uGurus mastermind of web agency owners I'm a member of. Notes Add strategic market data to marketing and sales materials, rather than just dry, factual product data. Market data motivates people who don't realize they need product/service. For example, a carpet cleaning company should explain how carpet cleaning makes home healthier (market data), rather than just stating that it cleans X feet of carpet for $Y (product data). When customer asks to be sent info rather than committing on the call, say, "We'd be happy to send the info. In fact, it's already on the way. Let me tell you what happens to people who receive the info. Either they read the info and they're so impressed that they sign up, or they're in such a reactive mode reacting to their business that they never take the time to read the info or to improve their business, and they do nothing. My question for you is: are you the type of person who would rather take action and learn how to double your business, or are you too busy reacting to your business to take the time to learn the skills to improve?" This led to a 50% increase in closes. 1/3 of people will buy something else offered at point of sale. Offer add-on sales at point of purchase. You can have a partner company offer your product as an add-on at its point of sale. Offer educational seminar/workshop to prospect: "I'm with XYZ company. We have a new program to teach business owners like you how to be more successful. Have you heard of it? We feel it's our obligation to make sure local businesses are successful as possible. So, we've underwritten a program to show you the 5 most common reasons that businesses fail. It also shows the 7 ways to become the most popular [business type] in the community. In the next week we'll be showing this to every other [business type] in the community and thought you'd want to learn the same thing. Are you interested in being more successful in your business and guarding against the problems your type of business faces? I'm one of the speakers who presents this info. The session includes my content and Q&A. What's a good time?" When you sell, you break rapport. When you educate, you build it. When you sell, people resist you. When you educate, they don't. The one who gives the market the most and best info beats those who give just product data. Market data is way more motivational than product data. Most people think of a shoe as a shoe (product data). But when you learn that your feet connect to the rest of your body (market data), that makes the show much more important. Tell why your product/service is important. Find the "smoking gun": a single fact that positions your offering above competitors. To find the smoking gun, look at market data over time to identify trends. The best salespeople are high-dominance, high-influence types, with bravado. Put on an educational seminar. Call prospects and say, "I'm sure you're aware of our company, we've been helping law firms be more successful for 50 years now. We recently commissioned a study on what's going on in the legal market, and we've learned that there are some pretty serious challenges facing lawyers. Since our survival depends on your success, we wanted to make sure that you saw this info and had every opportunity to be ahead of the problems. We put this info into a very succinct executive committee orientation, and we're now showing it to all the top law firms. We're in touch with [names] and are arranging to show this at one of their management meetings. We want to make sure you also see this info." This motivates with fear and uses social proof. Affiliate marketing is a much faster way to grow than other forms of marketing. Partner with non-competitors who sell to your market. Make your website an info source that people refer other to. Think of your website as a community; focus on it, not you. Get involved with and serve that community. E.g., Stonyfield Farms site offers info on organic farms, environmentalism, wellness. Start presentations with overview of industry over time, to get audience interested and show that you know something they don't. In presentations, don't pitch your product. Only use it as an example (such as in section titled "What to look for"). You'll see more prospects by offering education than by trying to sell your product. A great education can help them realize they need your product. Never call it a presentation; that sounds like a sales pitch. Call it an orientation or executive briefing. Rather than selling your product directly, sell an educational program that ultimately sells the product more effectively. Offer a free report to prospects, and rather than just sending it, present it live for a better sales opportunity. Say, "We present the report to go the extra mile. It has graphics, and we make it an orientation that we present live." To establish trust, make prospect feel that they're working with an expert. Do that by educating and giving valuable info that helps them succeed. Establish rapport by asking great questions and finding common interests. Use business questions to get into their personal life. An objection is an opportunity to close. Always agree with objections; prospect will drop their guard. If prospect says your product is too expensive, say, "That's certainly a good reason not to invest today." Pause, then say, "But tell me, is money the only thing standing between you and the product?" If there are more objections, they'll surface. Then say, "So, if I can find a way to help you afford the product, you'll buy it?" Then help with financing, or create more desire by showing how not buying will cost more in long run. Offer a free bonus product/service with the sale, to motivate them to buy now. Reverse the risk to neutralize objections by offering money-back guarantee. To make it stronger, tell them they can keep the bonus even if they claim guarantee. Bond with clients. Ultimate goal is that biggest clients become friends. Become involved in their lives and success of their businesses. Bond through structured follow up.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Leobardo

    Excelente libro para aprender muy variadas técnicas sobre como vender más y con mejores márgenes. Una obligación tenerlo muy cerca y altamente recomendable releerlo de vez en cuando para recordar los consejos prácticos para atraer muchos más prospectos y cerrar más negocios..

  10. 4 out of 5

    Cory Vance

    An excellent step by step guide to help grow any business. A great guide to be reviewed and studied again and again.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sean

    Learned nothing

  12. 5 out of 5

    Larissa

    Very interesting approach to sales processes that shifts the focus to organizational basics before going into specific advice regarding sales pitches and strategies. Chet Holmes' emphasis on discipline and determination is very welcome, especially as founders typically enjoy reading self and business improvement articles and books, but tend to somehow believe their company is impervious to the common sense around standardization, time management, and true focus on organizational alignment toward Very interesting approach to sales processes that shifts the focus to organizational basics before going into specific advice regarding sales pitches and strategies. Chet Holmes' emphasis on discipline and determination is very welcome, especially as founders typically enjoy reading self and business improvement articles and books, but tend to somehow believe their company is impervious to the common sense around standardization, time management, and true focus on organizational alignment towards efficiency and improvement: typically, they dip a toe into the process design waters and quickly return to their "It's best if I just do it myself" ways, quickly deeming information management efforts useless. The result is an organization that will never be able to scale, as crucial strategic information is forever retained exclusively in the founder's brain. The book was released in 2007 so don't expect data analytics to be a part of it; tech-wise, it's still marvelling over e-mail. That doesn't mean it isn't a relevant read, since its insights on organization are very practical and on-point; just don't expect it to be cutting edge in terms of advertisement.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Steve Weber

    Chet Holmes' The Ultimate Sales Machine was given to me as required reading for a new job. I dived into and quickly learned that it is different than most business books. This one lays out clearly what you will need to do in order to gain an edge in the working world. Even though the word "sales" is in the title, this could be your bible for any business role. I recommend this read for anyone who leads a team, is in marketing or is an entrepreneur. This is the type of book that you will need to Chet Holmes' The Ultimate Sales Machine was given to me as required reading for a new job. I dived into and quickly learned that it is different than most business books. This one lays out clearly what you will need to do in order to gain an edge in the working world. Even though the word "sales" is in the title, this could be your bible for any business role. I recommend this read for anyone who leads a team, is in marketing or is an entrepreneur. This is the type of book that you will need to keep referencing so I recommend you get a version that works for you to reference easily.

  14. 5 out of 5

    David Skinner

    There are many great tips in this book, with one of his main themes being that of dogged perseverance as the main key to sales success. However, he does not posit many entirely new suggestions. It was not a waste of time, however I would not include it in a sales curriculum.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sergey Ivanov

    Оценка больше за материал, чем за подачу. В книге много воды. Хотя нет — В КНИГЕ ОЧЕНЬ МНОГО ВОДЫ! А теперь к сути. Ultimate Sales Machine — самая правильная книга по продажам, которую я читал. Продажи — это следствие, а причины — маркетинг, тайм менеджмент, найм персонала, «облизывание» клиента и так далее. Именно о причинах идёт речь в книге. Материал, который подаётся в книге немного устарел, но основы будут актуальны и сегодня. Если в общем — маст рид для тех, кто строит свой бизнес и кому нуж Оценка больше за материал, чем за подачу. В книге много воды. Хотя нет — В КНИГЕ ОЧЕНЬ МНОГО ВОДЫ! А теперь к сути. Ultimate Sales Machine — самая правильная книга по продажам, которую я читал. Продажи — это следствие, а причины — маркетинг, тайм менеджмент, найм персонала, «облизывание» клиента и так далее. Именно о причинах идёт речь в книге. Материал, который подаётся в книге немного устарел, но основы будут актуальны и сегодня. Если в общем — маст рид для тех, кто строит свой бизнес и кому нужны хорошие продажи.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Loza Boza

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Ultimate Sales Machine Book review: Some good information but far too much noise surrounding it which would benefit from better editing. Most of the content was good but I disliked his chapter on hiring and thought it offered some poor advice. Chapter 1 Importance of time Mgmt Six tasks per day maximum Six hours of productive time per day Aim to be proactive not reactive Sales need to be doing 40-60 cold calls per day especially at the start. Record your calls to make sure you are doing, expect this t Ultimate Sales Machine Book review: Some good information but far too much noise surrounding it which would benefit from better editing. Most of the content was good but I disliked his chapter on hiring and thought it offered some poor advice. Chapter 1 Importance of time Mgmt Six tasks per day maximum Six hours of productive time per day Aim to be proactive not reactive Sales need to be doing 40-60 cold calls per day especially at the start. Record your calls to make sure you are doing, expect this to take circa 2.5 hours a day. Have templates for sales meetings, post meeting templates to record set details e.g. budget expectations, name of buyer, structure of organisation, preferred contract type, etc Chapter 2 Importance of training and lack of training= unstructured company and random results Insist on sales training!!! Set out training plan and get buy-in to it. Include external training e.g. tall Matt. Look to work shadow people by be mindful of copying mistakes. Enjoy the RiskCo meetings and use it as a “hot seat” training experience. Value of training is most accomplished through regular training as people become more open to engaging and taking the lessons on plus it compounds on previous training. I could offer to do some contract training. Chapter 3 - effective meetings Dedicate one hour every week to PPP Planning, procedures and policies. Your aim should be to write out how every detailed step of critical tasks is undertaken. So much level of detail that if 50 new people joined within one week they could all learn the job! Workshopping is the most effective way of doing this. Has an example of how to ask the team “three things they would improve” and then collate the results. Assign actions between the team and then report back to the team with PPP tools to help the team. I should plan, test and policy every step of the cold calling process. 10 step process to implement a new policy: 1. Get everyone to feel the pain!!! Best way is to ask them what the top three challenges they face are? 2. Hold a workshop to generate solutions. 3. Develop a conceptual solution 4. Test the conceptual solution on top talent first - they will give the correct detailed PPP solution for others to follow 5. Set a deadline for testing conceptual solution 6. Document step by step solution 7. Hold show and tell and role playing training sessions 8. Have another workshop on how to improve 9. Monitor the procedure directly 10. Measure and reward the outcome - make the reward a ceremony so that people receive public praise. Chapter 4 Aim to be a brilliant strategist who can also knuckle down to implement at the tactical level. The strategy should be to educate clients on their market. Same as Shipley look to tell them about themselves not about us in the first instance. Aim to “reset the buying criteria”, for example with water, show data about the long term trends of increasing environmental legislation, increasing water prices, increasing options for water supply and discharge via privatised markets. Then swoop in with our ability to help. I need to create a “stadium pitch” that holds all potential buyers in a room. E.g. Do you want to decrease your costs by a completely outsourced solution? Position yourself as an expert via your market education. Creating this pitch requires market data and this needs to be generated through market research e.g. tools that Sherrie showed me. Aim to find the “smoking gun” that influences the market e.g. water fines are increasing OR companies are overpaying across the industry OR water impacts on operations… Chapter 5 The sales superstar needs to be hired based on personality. He recommends the DISC personality test. Dominance and Influence are the key characteristics for sales. The never say die ego that always needs to dominate is a key characteristic for persistence and closing. Advocates rejecting at telephone interview stage. Then if they fight their corner, go on to the real interview: Relax - allow them, may encourage them to open up about who they really are. Probe - very important to react positively to everything they say to keep them honest and comfortable Attack - final test of their character after they have committed of themselves… Overall not the strongest of chapters, very weak on how to manage people but good insight on what makes a tenacious sales person. Chapter 6 Very important to focus your efforts on the best buyers, those companies who buy big, buy quick and buy more often. Similar to the basketball expression if the well is pumping oil you keep pumping. He writes out an entire script that he used on page 1928. My version (needs work) “I'm sure you're aware of our company in the waste sector but this is actually the smaller part of our business, Suez is the largest water company in the world. We have products and experience across all sectors in the water market. We recently commissioned a study into what challenges the UK industrial sector faces in relation to water. We have several food and beverage manufacturers who we are currently consulting with on this issue including: AB and Beverage, Coca cola, Heineken e.t.c.”. Needs to use fear and include “social proof”,needs to be phrased carefully do as to be true but ambitious. This must be backed up by solid research. The importance of chasing dream clients cannot be overstated. JFDI and continue to keep chasing them until they feel obligated to do business with you! Build a list of my dream 100 clients and chase them. Build a list of dream affiliates (those in similar markets that don't offer our services). There are a few good exercises to do in this chapter. Chapter 7 Ask for all the marketing and PR materials that have been produced to date for both IW and SASUK. Essential that there is a strong collaboration between sales and marketing. Aim for “stacked marketing” where all PR, marketing, web etc is coordinated with a consistent message, look and feel built on your “stadium pitch”. Importance of visuals in any promotional material e.g. dust mite close up for the carpet cleaning business. Consistent use of colour builds a brand awareness. Corporate material should repeat the data, visuals and messages of the “stadium pitch”. Repetition is a form of learning and we are aiming to teach the client about their industry and our contribution. Build a PR strategy aimed at the South of England. Include top publications, top clients, top products and then write articles to get published with plenty of photos. Build a casebook of material for attending events. If this can reinforce the stadium pitch and the corporate material it builds brand loyalty and prevents competitors stealing it effectively. Key to making this happen is to build relationships with the trade press, phone them and attend their shows on a regular basis. Quotes from reputable trade sources are worth far more than anything we write in our own pitches… Target some easy wins first e.g. CIWEM magazine now that there is a new editor. Any old website to start with will help and then build that back up through the business to get sponsorship for better investment in trade publications. Try to get a photo of myself in an article to help build my own personal brand. Even a photo of me on site will help in the corporate material. Do the exercises in this chapter and get Niki's help with them. Rules of trade shows: Get noticed - be the fun booth! Capture leads - give people multiple choice feedback forms to get more accurate response. Organise charity events. Wateraid will be a good one for me, do fundraising events and use these to network. How I do this across the South of England is the challenge… To get people to attend on a Friday night with their partners would be the ultimate. Identify your “market influencer” and then engage them to help sell your product. If you have enough clout, or influence over someone else who does, an awards ceremony is a great marketing event Setup your own trade association to engage your dream 100. Run an industry teleconference on popular topics to help engage, could be done as a webinar. Set up a bunch of these in advance to make sure we have the content to fill a year ahead. I could augment the topics and content of the water podcast but run them as webinars with a Q&A session. Particular examples could be contract law. If the webinars got a following they could be marketed to the utilities market to promote their messages to the industrial customers e.g. value of water saving, what industrial effluents cause most harm, how to notify of a pollution incident. Hold monthly meetings with marketing to audit progress against the objectives. Chapter 8 Use the limbic system in the brain to communicate hard messages at the same time as your words. Use charts going into the red and use redundancy/depression images to illicit the fear stages. Then use successful images (project completion ribbon cutting), etc to show the successful solution. Body parts help draw attention. Getting people to draw over a webinar/telecom significantly helps keep their engagement. Even if it is just a triangle, get this exercise worked through with the team in a workshop before trying on the clientbase. Wow facts get the audience really invested in your authority. Work really hard to find these so that people see you as being an industry expert. This then leans over into the sale side. Failure rate or changes in competition are the easy ones to find. Look also at supply chains and how they are changing - consolidation, internet, e.t.c. learn a few general market trends and drill these to the specific for the wow facts. Communicate in stories wherever possible. Read a book on how to craft stories, do some story workshops. His story on following up a bad sale to get further sales is a really good one (p.162). Make presentations curiosity driven, keep the audience hanging on to see what the next slide is e.g. “this means you have some serious competition which we now look at in the next slide”, “this means that you can incur some hefty penalties if you don't adhere to the legislation, the next slide shows you how to adhere”... Put more effort into the headlines of the presentation than into anything else! These do the most work for you. Build rapport by asking them to stretch with you! Or engage them on their problems “misery loves company". Ask for their personal work challenges then broaden to what they see as industry challenges. Close this out by “Those challenges you’ve mentioned come up a lot with other clients. That’s one of the reasons we had some research conducted about our industry/market/profession. Our findings were so profound that we put them into an executive briefing that’s quite revealing. Here. Let me show you some of this data.” “Turn your mirrors into windows!” focus on other people not on yourself. Communication mediums: Tone - practice sounding like an investigating detective to get the authority you need in your tone. Body language - “You know what? I think I can show you this better if we sit side by side.” 8 mistakes in presentations: 1. Thanking people for their time - puts you on the back foot. 2. Hands in pockets - too lackadaisical, always out in front above the waist. 3. Sitting down - always ask if people mind you standing because you feel more comfortable, noone ever says no. 4. Being led by questions - return the questions to the presentation (by asking return questions if necessary) and maintain control. 5. Relying on the materials - keep your enthusiasm and personality present. 6. Too serious - always include a joke! 7. Failing to practice - make it exciting, fast-paced, draw conclusions, know the material, be dynamic. 8. Unsure what comes next - know the “patter between the panels” is key to engagement via presell, preframe and promise of what is to come… Lastly, don't call it a presentation call it an executive briefing. Chapter 9 1. Choose dream 100 2. Choose simple, inexpensive and useful gifts to weave into a narrative. He has a list on page 178 3. Send a brief call to action letter, page 178 has example 4. Set a calendar of monthly gifts and fortnightly newsletter updates. 5. Follow up phone calls after every communication, script on page 184 and cold calling script on page 186 6. Present the executive briefing, use prize for best presentation competitions to get the sales team learning from each other. Page 187 encoursges use of internet presentations for smaller pitches. “To build the Ultimate Sales Machine, you must devote machinelike precision to chase and tackle those dream prospects” Chapter 10 Learn the seven sales steps by memory: 7. Establish rapport 8. Qualify the buyer (find the need) 9. Build value 10. Create desire 11. Overcome objections 12. Close the sale 13. Follow up Rapport According to the Encarta World English Dictionary, rapport is “an emotional bond or friendly relationship between people based on mutual liking, trust, and a sense that they understand and share each other’s concerns.” Selling breaks rapport, educating builds it. Ask personal questions early - how long have you been in this line of work? What do you think of the industry? More examples on page 196. Enjoy and make it fun, especially with humor. Even send a joke once in a while but keep this to a minimum. Remember that “misery loves company” let people moan. Be interested and fascinated in them. Find common interests and “mirror” their body language. Do explorative training sessions on rapport building within the team. Ask them how many things they can find out about clients and hold a competition! Qualify the buyer - Andy's “discovery” stage Develop six to ten questions that will gain the information needed on each prospect and memorise it. Put this into templates so that it is easily recorded before and after. Try to pre-empt where you think they will be and then listen empathically when they answer. Say things like I thought you would have been X so I'm surprised that you are Y can you tell me why this was chosen? What are you three main challenges in relation to your mail manufacturing process? What are your criteria for making a buying decision on a product or service like ours? This question needs to be done more subtly than it is written e.g. what factors make you choose one product/service over another? Asking the right questions can get the person to close themselves. Build value Whether you ever do business with us or not you should know some of this information we have gathered on being successful in your marketplace. Deliver the one to two minutes core story (stadium pitch). Create desire • Lead them through a series of questions to intensify their desire • Present killer data that truly motivates them to action Our core story on the market trends etc builds up to this. People are more inclined to protect what they have than to pursue new opportunities (Kahneman links). “Features tell, benefits sell” tailor this sell to “their benefits” not our products. Remember MCT got a five mill contract on the back of fuck all!!! Overcome objections The better you qualify them the fewer objections you should face. Top sales people qualify the heck out of a prospect to learn all possible buying blocks. Standard closing questions to get the prospect thinking of what they lose out on are on page 203. Have a mindset that “an objection is an opportunity to close”. Always agree with an objection first then follow the disagreement steps from leadership training. Isolating the objection is a powerful strategy to close someone. Close the sale Weak ego strength and fear of rejection stop people closing. Just go for it! Chapter 11 Follow up needs to be structured to keep in the client’s mind. The follow up needs to reiterate the client's hot buttons for buying to keep them respecting you and trusting you. 1. First follow up letter - within two hours and use the template on page 214 (personal, compliment, hot buttons, personal close) add educational marketing materials. 2. First follow up call - call with a non-sales call to maintain contact e.g. “hi, I was thinking about the way you manage xyz and I just thought that zyx may be of use if you haven't already tried it” 3. Send something personal - send an article related to a personal connection you made e.g. mountain biking. He recommends using a standard humourous email at this stage, can be templated. 4. Organise a bonding event e.g. meal, party etc 5. Second follow up email or card - tell them the next step 6. Plan a family event 7. Offer something else e.g. a networking introduction to another company 8. Another email - template it 9. Offer more help e.g. training via webinar 10. Invite them into your personal life e.g.go mountain biking Chapter 12 Positive mindset stuff “fake it til you make it" Your brain is most receptive to setting goals first thing in the morning and last thing at night so these are the times to focus on goal setting and visualisation e.g. a successful sell. Phrase goals and desires in the present tense to cue your autosuggestion activation. I have to wake up on time Vs I must not oversleep “Never go to sleep without a request to your subconscious.” Create a RAS recording to listen to before sleeping suggested statements on page 232. Include the “I love cold calling” one. Set lifetime goals and view them every day e.g. car dashboard, to get the RAS working on them. Template on page 233. Measuring effectiveness “People respect what you inspect” Record all details in Salesforce to get fuller picture of success. Follow up: Remember that breaking through the clutter, even to get hung up on, now gives you a tiny filament of contact. If you immediately fax a note, you’ve strengthened the filament. So a fax should go off immediately that says: “You just hung up on me, but I don’t think you understood the significance of my call or you would not have done so. Consider this: [pitch again what they’ll learn from the “orientation”]. From page 237

  17. 5 out of 5

    Trevor

    Anecdotes of Holmes' time with Charlie Munger are peppered throughout and are generally entertaining and informative, unfortunately they also become repetitive and somewhat trite. Holmes was obviously a master salesman and an excellent trainer however much of the books' advice is either overly broad (being doggedly persistent helps close deals) or too specific (providing exact phraseology). Overall I found it an interesting read but my general sense as a non-salesman is that any number of more r Anecdotes of Holmes' time with Charlie Munger are peppered throughout and are generally entertaining and informative, unfortunately they also become repetitive and somewhat trite. Holmes was obviously a master salesman and an excellent trainer however much of the books' advice is either overly broad (being doggedly persistent helps close deals) or too specific (providing exact phraseology). Overall I found it an interesting read but my general sense as a non-salesman is that any number of more recent "how to sell" books are more worthwhile as much of Holmes' advice is either outdated (send a personalized fax...) or generic enough to be covered in newer offerings.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    Great for a sales person if the only thing you care about is numbers. Call 1,000 leads and get 1 sale. Sounds logical then to pump out as many calls as possible or, in his case, have someone else do it. His dedication to system based approach would be more digestible if the purpose instead was to increase or maintain quality and let the numbers come in higher as a by-product.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Camilo Rodriguez

    Loved Every single chapter! Specially the Stadium Presentarion concept!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dmitry Kuriakov

    Пожалуй, это одна из последних книг, что были выпущены на русском языке относительно давно, которую я хотел прочесть и всякий раз отказывался от этой затеи. Что-то типа 6 чувства заставляло меня отложить книгу, несмотря на крайне положительные рейтинги и желание закончить со «старыми» книгами по бизнесу. И вот наконец-то, одолел. И хочу сразу предупредить тех, кто, как и я ранее, думает, что это что-то типа Котлера, Друкера, 4‐х томник по СПИН продажам и прочая серьёзная литература. Так вот. Это Пожалуй, это одна из последних книг, что были выпущены на русском языке относительно давно, которую я хотел прочесть и всякий раз отказывался от этой затеи. Что-то типа 6 чувства заставляло меня отложить книгу, несмотря на крайне положительные рейтинги и желание закончить со «старыми» книгами по бизнесу. И вот наконец-то, одолел. И хочу сразу предупредить тех, кто, как и я ранее, думает, что это что-то типа Котлера, Друкера, 4‐х томник по СПИН продажам и прочая серьёзная литература. Так вот. Это не она. Это совершенно другая сторона бизнес-литературы, которая лишь хочет выглядеть серьёзной, претендующей на академичность, но которая лишь имитирует её. Данную книгу можно частично отнести к разряду книг «Думай и богатей», «Богатый папа, бедный папа», «Думай как миллионер», «Малый бизнес», и в особенности, к подобным книгам по теме продаж, что были написаны в прошлом веке. Лично я бы обозначил суть книги как «мой способ вести бизнес» с использованием того же стиля, который используют различные гуру строительства счастья и успеха, т.е. все эти сверхуспешные миллионеры которые горят желанием поделиться секретом своего успеха. Автор в своей книге, просто-таки прессует покупателей, предлагая, в крайне агрессивной манере, свои товары или услуги. Впрочем, такая же политика у него и по отношению к своим сотрудникам. В самом начале, где он пишет о тайм-менеджменте, он до маниакальности будет всё сводить к жесткому графику и жёсткой дисциплине среди сотрудников. В принципе, тут нет какой-то отдельно взятой темы. Т.е. как я уже сказал, это книга не о продажах. Это книга о том, как автор продаёт, его стиль или даже лучше сказать, его философия управления фирмой. И в дополнении к вышесказанному я бы ещё добавил, что это метод из прошлого, т.е. учитывая сегодняшние реалии (Интернет, социальные сети и пр.) - книга устарела (это особенно заметно после прочтения книги «Человеку свойственно продавать» Дэниел Пинк). Второй момент, который меня насторожил, это те примеры и диалоги, которыми наполнена книга. Они мне кажутся крайне фальшивыми и неправдоподобными. Автор использует их для придания авторитетности своим словам, однако без чёткой и твёрдой теории, которой у автора нет вообще, они выглядят, не просто зауши притянутыми, а именно фальшивыми, выдуманными. Третий момент заключается в том, что автор добавил в книгу очень много, с одной стороны пустословия, а с другой - здравого смысла. Т.е. такие вещи как скидки, добавления бесплатного в виде подарков клиентам и пр., настолько очевидны, что лишь отвлекают. Убери их и книга потеряет половину своей смысловой нагрузки. Хотя, не исключаю, и просто исчезнет, т.к. как я уже сказал, собственной теории, собственных предложений у автора нет. Итак, подведём итог. Автор ведёт свое повествование, начиная с тайм-менеджмента (ничего ценного, нового и интересного, как и теории как таковой), далее пишет о важности постоянных тренингов для сотрудников (в особенности для отдела продаж), далее о важности и о способе найма суперзвёзд в области продаж, далее очень мутная тема о выборе самых прибыльных покупателей (я так и не понял главную идею автора, но возможно речь идёт о законе Парето 80/20) и закончил бы я перечисление большой темой, где автор будет разбирать такие вопросы как: реклама, директ мейл, корпоративная литература, PR, персональные контакты, обучение/образование, Интернет. Всё это автор преподносит таким образом, что применить у себя просто нереально. Автор просто, без какой-либо теории, приводит примеры различных реклам и пр. Всё! Единственный выход – нанять самого автора. И я думаю, это главная задумка всей книги.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Angela Lam

    This book supposedly offers 12 strategies that you can use to master 3 areas in any business--management, sales and marketing--and apply them such that it will create your ultimate sales machine that withstands the test of time. Having worked in large organizations and run my own business, I can see the value in many of these tips. The writing is clear, the examples are illustrative... all the makings of a decent book. BUT, the main issue is this--the book does NOT present 12 clear strategies. In This book supposedly offers 12 strategies that you can use to master 3 areas in any business--management, sales and marketing--and apply them such that it will create your ultimate sales machine that withstands the test of time. Having worked in large organizations and run my own business, I can see the value in many of these tips. The writing is clear, the examples are illustrative... all the makings of a decent book. BUT, the main issue is this--the book does NOT present 12 clear strategies. Instead, it is simply organized in 12 chapters that broadly address: time management, training, meetings, talent management, strategy, marketing, sales, ideal buyers, presentations, closing skills, follow-ups, and implementation. Some chapters focus on 1 central idea, others cover a few processes or dos and don'ts. e.g. there's a chapter on making good presentations (which is really more of a bunch of dos and don'ts) and a chapter on 7 marketing tools (which is really an intro to marketing channels rather than a real strategy per se). Still, gotta give it to Holmes and the marketing team for this book.... the way the book was positioned with the angle of 12 proven strategy is definitely smart. Shows that their "strategies" work eh? I'm giving it 4* as it's otherwise really a good book. Personally, I really liked the concepts of "workshop meetings", "buyers pyramid" and the creative approach direct mailers that Holmes recommends. There'll definitely be something you can takeaway to apply to your business. Book summary at: https://readingraphics.com/book-summa...

  22. 5 out of 5

    Yesenia Gonzalez

    "Touch it once" One of the many great things I learned from this book is the "touch it once" system. Many of us have that one thing you avoid doing. On your desk you may have a project your boss told you to do but you have been avoiding it so you move it from the top of the pile to the bottom of the pile. By the time you know it you have touched it a dozen times without actually doing the task. We may have laundry at home you walk by it and say I will do it this week. Or dishes that pile up. For "Touch it once" One of the many great things I learned from this book is the "touch it once" system. Many of us have that one thing you avoid doing. On your desk you may have a project your boss told you to do but you have been avoiding it so you move it from the top of the pile to the bottom of the pile. By the time you know it you have touched it a dozen times without actually doing the task. We may have laundry at home you walk by it and say I will do it this week. Or dishes that pile up. For this matter Chet Holmes tells us if we touch it once then we have to do it. That way you will feel guilty touching it twice and not taking care of the task. One of the many simple yet golden nuggets in this book.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Dillon

    Of all the sales and business books I've read, I have to say that this by far the best one. The advice is highly valuable, practical, and universally applicable in most any industry and size of organization. Sales is the life-blood of every single organization on the planet. Whether you’re selling a product/service or selling an idea, sales and marketing are the keys to success. If you are looking to expand your business with advice from the sales guru who had Charlie Munger questioning his legali Of all the sales and business books I've read, I have to say that this by far the best one. The advice is highly valuable, practical, and universally applicable in most any industry and size of organization. Sales is the life-blood of every single organization on the planet. Whether you’re selling a product/service or selling an idea, sales and marketing are the keys to success. If you are looking to expand your business with advice from the sales guru who had Charlie Munger questioning his legality due to his impressive sales records, then this is the book for you! I will be implementing this knowledge into my current businesses as well as helping my business consulting clients in growing their businesses.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kyle Robins

    This is by far the best book on sales I have every read. Rather than talking about motivation or secret techniques for closing the sale - Chet Holmes discusses the exact strategies he used to close over 50 of his Fortune 500 clients. It could be condensed and is not the easiest read, but the information inside is invaluable and I believe is the only book an organization needs if they want to massively improve their sales.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Claire

    I'm not a sales person, I've been known to say "I couldn't sell ice in a desert" but this book made so much sense to me that I know I could sell if I followed the logical steps set out in this book. Thankfully however, the book also convinced me that I don't have the personality needed to be a high performing sales person so I won't be inflicting that experience on the world. Whether you're a sales person or you work with sales people, I think this is a must read.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tony

    At the time that this book was written it would had contain many innovative ideas that people could learn from, but as of now the idea that I read was pretty common. But there were bits of information that I had not learn before, such as picking employees who contain a checklist of personality that will be beneficial to the company.

  27. 4 out of 5

    David West

    This book contained some helpful strategies but wasn't what I expected. I expected more about sales proper, but the book ranged from how to do a successful billboard ad to how to do a great presentation to how to have a successful mindset. Some of the sales strategies were good but many seemed manipulative or even a little deceptive.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Anthony Gibson

    Comprehensive Does a good job covering all aspects of a business. Gives a great overview and offers many practical suggestions, from training workshops to customer follow-up. Definitely worth the read.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Trudy

    Some useful ideas for those of us who aren't in sales. My biggest takeaways: *dedicate 1 hour per week on areas that need improvement that otherwise wouldn't get attention *When pitching, always put things in terms of the customer's benefit/point if view, not you or your product's advantages *Don't waffle when trying to make a sale. A great example was a real estate agent who told a couple about to buy their first house something like "Now buying a house is a big decision and shouldn't be rushed in Some useful ideas for those of us who aren't in sales. My biggest takeaways: *dedicate 1 hour per week on areas that need improvement that otherwise wouldn't get attention *When pitching, always put things in terms of the customer's benefit/point if view, not you or your product's advantages *Don't waffle when trying to make a sale. A great example was a real estate agent who told a couple about to buy their first house something like "Now buying a house is a big decision and shouldn't be rushed into..." *Measure effectiveness (people respect what you inspect) *Don't engage in self-talk like "I can't ...", "I'm no good at ..." because your mind can't always distinguish thoughts from truth and eventually you'll start believing yourself

  30. 4 out of 5

    Richard Zreik

    One of the best sales books Liked the clear process and the mental models Chet likes to use in his system. The 12 steps are quite overarching for an entire span of business management work. One can use sections of the book at different intervals of execution.

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