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Hotel

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During five days in the midst of a hot, steamy Louisiana summer, the lives of a colorful cast of characters intertwine in a series of public, private, and personal dramas at the famed St. Gregory luxury hotel.


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During five days in the midst of a hot, steamy Louisiana summer, the lives of a colorful cast of characters intertwine in a series of public, private, and personal dramas at the famed St. Gregory luxury hotel.

30 review for Hotel

  1. 4 out of 5

    Arah-Lynda

    While conducting research for the writing of this novel, Arthur Hailey spent two months as a paying guest at the Roosevelt Hotel in New Orleans.  The owner of the Roosevelt, the late Seymour Weiss, instructed his department heads to answer Hailey’s questions honestly and without holding back and urged them to direct their staff to do the same.  Hailey believes that Weiss had become weary of his hotel and the corruption that had seized it.    The Roosevelt still exists, only these days it is call While conducting research for the writing of this novel, Arthur Hailey spent two months as a paying guest at the Roosevelt Hotel in New Orleans.  The owner of the Roosevelt, the late Seymour Weiss, instructed his department heads to answer Hailey’s questions honestly and without holding back and urged them to direct their staff to do the same.  Hailey believes that Weiss had become weary of his hotel and the corruption that had seized it.    The Roosevelt still exists, only these days it is called the Fairmont.  I found it interesting to research this hotel in New Orleans as I was reading the book. So onto the story.  Basically what Hailey has done is focused on five hot and humid days in the Louisiana summer of 1964, at a New Orleans luxury hotel called the The St. Gregory.  The principal character in this story is Peter McDermott, who is the assistant general manager of the hotel.  Through him we meet other members of the staff and some of the noteworthy guests.   And these are not just any five days at the St. Gregory, for in exactly that period of time the twenty year old mortgage on the hotel is due for renewal.  Problem is that so far no-one was willing to renew it.  Warren Trent, the owner was becoming increasingly concerned about his last remaining option, which was to sell his beloved hotel; his lifetime achievement.  Naturally there  are reasons that financial institutions are reluctant to pick up or renew the mortgage.  In short,  the St. Gregory was poorly managed, which was having a negative impact on the bottom line. Peter McDermott knows very well that corruption runs rampant among the many different departments and staff of the hotel.  Given a free hand, he would clean house and put things right, but he has long since become frustrated with his efforts in getting Warren Trent to see or even acknowledge the problems, particularly as they involved certain key members of staff or long held hotel policies.. Hailey seamlessly weaves the management of a large and luxurious establishment together with the lives and eccentricities of it's many guests.  There is never a dull moment and although Hotel cannot help but be dated, (first published in 1965) I have no doubt that many of the challenges faced in this story continue to plague similar establishments to this very day.  As this story reaches its screeching, chilling conclusion it may have you rethinking which amenities you wish to avail yourself of on your next visit to a large and splendid hotel of yesteryear.  

  2. 4 out of 5

    W

    Hotel established Hailey as one of the bestselling authors in the world.It also became a TV mini series. As in most Hailey books,there are several intriguing subplots. One man is at the centre of it all,Peter McDermott,the hotel's assistant general manager. The hotel's owner struggles with financial difficulties as a business rival tries to buy him out and make the hotel a part of his own chain.He is accompanied by a Hollywood starlet,who reminded me in some ways of Marilyn Monroe. A thief is on th Hotel established Hailey as one of the bestselling authors in the world.It also became a TV mini series. As in most Hailey books,there are several intriguing subplots. One man is at the centre of it all,Peter McDermott,the hotel's assistant general manager. The hotel's owner struggles with financial difficulties as a business rival tries to buy him out and make the hotel a part of his own chain.He is accompanied by a Hollywood starlet,who reminded me in some ways of Marilyn Monroe. A thief is on the prowl,looking for his opportunity. There is a hit and run case involving a couple of hotel guests and an unscrupluous house detective. A black man is barred from attending a dentists' convention,and it nearly becomes a crisis. A girl is assaulted and a mysterious guest falls seriously ill. Meanwhile,the hotel's employees are all on the lookout to make a fast buck. The story moves along briskly. It all comes together in an explosive,unforgettable climax.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Anushree

    (3.5) “No. I wish to cancel that order and place another”. “Yes Ma’am.” When we generally say this in the hotels and restaurants and promptly another dish is served (or not served for whatever reasons) do we ever sit back and wonder what goes on behind the scenes? Sometimes we perhaps do, but what we imagine is probably only 1/100th of the actual hassle the hotel staff must have undergone to make that one thing available, not counting making it look absolutely hassle-free. Arthur Hailey’s “Hotel” (3.5) “No. I wish to cancel that order and place another”. “Yes Ma’am.” When we generally say this in the hotels and restaurants and promptly another dish is served (or not served for whatever reasons) do we ever sit back and wonder what goes on behind the scenes? Sometimes we perhaps do, but what we imagine is probably only 1/100th of the actual hassle the hotel staff must have undergone to make that one thing available, not counting making it look absolutely hassle-free. Arthur Hailey’s “Hotel” takes us through one such hotel in a detailed, rather immensely elaborate story. This one has multiple characters and inter-woven plots that somehow converge, to make a distinctly riveting narrative. This was my 100th book of 2017 and incidentally 1st of Hailey’s – couldn’t have been a better choice than this for my Popsugar prompt of “A Book set in a Hotel”. The book took me back to my initial reading days when an exciting plot made up most of the story, with very little attention of the reader towards the language or other nuances. (Just to be clear, I am not discrediting the language here just that one doesn’t focus on that much). At the same time, I believe, Hailey’s “TV-Series’ish” tale was a good combination of character arcs and some bitter rumination of the Civil Rights’ Movement during the time (1964 to be precise), as well as subjects such as commercialism, capitalism, morality and loyalty. The role of women is sketched, perhaps, looking at those times. They don’t have a major story-line. That said there is certainly an aura of strength in the women, especially Dodo, who has been given a stereotype of a “dumb blonde”, but by the end of it all, looks like is much more than what she appears to be. There is no dramatization of reality. There is a vigorous portrayal of a need to be ethical and the conundrum associated with it when it comes to running certain major establishments and institutions especially in an age of fiscal boom. Peter McDermott is a resourceful young assistant manager at St. Gregory, one of the oldest hotels of New Orleans. The owner of St. Gregory, Warren Trent, still believes in the values of customer service and human touch. Most of his patrons are a return-clientele and a many staff members are the ones who were employed by him right when the hotel was only a small inn. He has been refusing to give in to the phenomenon of chain-hotels which has engulfed the country - until of course now. St. Gregory is not doing great - with respect to management and finances. There is also tremendous level of debauchery going on at the ground level, the extent of which is hidden from Trent owing to his misplaced trust in his older staff. McDermott knows all of this and wants to change the way things are run, but owing to the obstinate nature of his employer has only failed so far. The book starts on a busy Monday morning inside the hotel and we see Peter trying to tackle multiple things at a time. There is an intermittent moaning being heard from a room, a suspicion of a possible orgy in another one, a customer service issue raised by one of the wealthiest clients of the hotel, another sort of disturbance on one of the floors, an elevator issue and then there is his employer, who we see is quite worried because of a mortgage due for renewal by the end of the same week which is not a happy news. The bankers have issued a due date for foreclosure with an amount of $2mn. The story takes us through various occurrences in the hotel for that full week and comes to a chilling climax. Some stuff is cliché and predictable but for some reason I wasn’t disappointed. Sometimes clichés make really good stories like this one. It doesn’t have any great interpretational requirement, neither is there a thrill of guessing any perpetrator, and yet, the reader wishes to know “What next?” I have my gripes of course, which is why the lesser number of stars. Some details could have been curtailed. The intricate details of the working of an incinerator or an elevator sometimes become a tad bit drudged and unnecessary. We know these two machines will play a major part later after the first few lines and yet Hailey spends lengthy passages to drive the point home. There was a little disappointment somewhere with respect to one character. Nevertheless, I will read Hailey again simply because of the extensive research that Hailey put on show in this one. (Trivia: Hailey resided in Hotel Roosevelt in New Orleans in 1964 to research for this book) Would love to hear your thoughts if you have read this book or any other book by Arthur Hailey.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    It's a good little story, this - who would have thought you could make the daily runnings of a hotel that interesting? Despite the odd crazy cliche the characters here are excellent, given that it's only a shortish book and not exactly heavily philosophical or anything too deep. I feel I'm doing it a disservice here actually: the characters, 2 or 3 of them in particular, are rather excellent in their own right. A well paced (and getting right into the thick of things early on) and enlightening ta It's a good little story, this - who would have thought you could make the daily runnings of a hotel that interesting? Despite the odd crazy cliche the characters here are excellent, given that it's only a shortish book and not exactly heavily philosophical or anything too deep. I feel I'm doing it a disservice here actually: the characters, 2 or 3 of them in particular, are rather excellent in their own right. A well paced (and getting right into the thick of things early on) and enlightening tale, it is very obvious that Mr Hailey, when researching this book, spent a lot of time in large hotels and gleaned an awful lot of inside knowledge on the industry and operation of these vast complexes, if he didn't somehow have it all up there already. The result is an insight into hotel management of the period in the United States, and is thoroughly fascinating, brought to our attention by the skillful creation of plausible characters. And a few unexpected things besides: well worth a read, as, I imagine, are Hailey's other books including Airport and some other single-word titles that lead me to believe that, like Michael Crichton and a great many others, Hailey may have a little bit of a repetitive formula going on if you read his whole catalogue. But hey - this one is very enjoyable.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    Disclaimer: ARC read via Netgalley courtesy of Open Road Integrated Media. I am old enough (or young enough depending on your viewpoint) to vaguely remember seeing commercials for the television series based on this novel. So I admit reading this was somewhat more of an interest of why did people love/like enough for it to be a television series. I’m not sure what the answer to my question is, but I must admit this was better than I thought it would be. Hotel takes place in the 60s, just at the Disclaimer: ARC read via Netgalley courtesy of Open Road Integrated Media. I am old enough (or young enough depending on your viewpoint) to vaguely remember seeing commercials for the television series based on this novel. So I admit reading this was somewhat more of an interest of why did people love/like enough for it to be a television series. I’m not sure what the answer to my question is, but I must admit this was better than I thought it would be. Hotel takes place in the 60s, just at the start of the Civil Rights Movement. It is about a hotel (duh) in New Orleans that is going through a crisis. The story shifts between hotel owner, staff, guests, and a would be buyer. The strength in the book isn’t the plot, which to be frank, is rather predictable from the first chapter to the end, but the characters. The book functions more as a believable character study more than anything else. I have to give him props for the character of Dodo is not really a dumb blonde at all, though her story arc was cliché. The book also is very much a product of its time in terms of the woman characters who are in the standard jobs (if they have a job at all). But this is made up for the relationship between the hotel’s manager Peter, and Royce, an African American law student whose relationship with the owner/ president of the hotel, Trent, seems to be a holdover not only from Royce’s father but slave days. This is made more problematic because Trent refuses to desegregate the hotel. And it is this plot point that makes the most interesting read, at least from today’s standpoint. If this were a true Hollywood movie, at by today’s production teams, it would end with Trent realizing the errors of his ways, Peter and Royce becoming BBFs, and the hotel allowing lower income inner city former gang members to work there. The book isn’t today’s Hollywood. While the desegregation issues are handled with typical Hollywood dramatic flair, its outcome is more realistic and nuanced. This makes up for the predictable plot elements like the sick guest, the stealing, the hanky panky and spanky, and the murder plot. Additionally, Hailey’s restrained prose makes the book read more like an HBO series than a daytime soap opera. While it is not a book, I don’t think I would buy (it really isn’t my thing), it was enjoyable, and far more so than the Dan Simmons book I was reading at the same time. In fact, I kept putting that book down to read this. If you like soap operas, this is enough romance and angst here to keep you happy as well. Crossposted at Booklikes.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Marian

    This book was published in 1965. I probably read it at least several times when I was a teenager. Recently I started thinking about it, and decided to read it again. It totally holds up. Arthur Hailey is a good writer, an excellent storyteller, an expert at plotting and character development, and a genius at weaving story lines and characters together. The book is dated, of course, but who cares? One thing that made me laugh was a successful hotelier's vision of what hotels of the future would b This book was published in 1965. I probably read it at least several times when I was a teenager. Recently I started thinking about it, and decided to read it again. It totally holds up. Arthur Hailey is a good writer, an excellent storyteller, an expert at plotting and character development, and a genius at weaving story lines and characters together. The book is dated, of course, but who cares? One thing that made me laugh was a successful hotelier's vision of what hotels of the future would be like. It hasn't come into being yet! Anyway...next I'm going to read Airport. :)

  7. 5 out of 5

    Readingspree joseph

    Arthur Hailey can make the most mundane things interesting and in this case i found myself dieing to know the fate of the Hotel. The unlikely hero Peter Mc Dermot is fascinating and and in incredibly attractive in a way that transcends just physical good looks. The story is masterfully told and the attention to detail is unlike any other author of his age

  8. 5 out of 5

    Yogya Hari Prakash Burra

    Arthur Hailey is just brilliant. He takes an industrial setting like an Airport or a Hotel, and explains the daily operations involved in running such places from the perspective of a key player, mostly a senior manager. The seemingly mundane activities are always very well described and his research is meticulous. It is said that he used to research an industry for years together to portray its nitty gritties accurately. The Human element in these books is also very good with a slew of characte Arthur Hailey is just brilliant. He takes an industrial setting like an Airport or a Hotel, and explains the daily operations involved in running such places from the perspective of a key player, mostly a senior manager. The seemingly mundane activities are always very well described and his research is meticulous. It is said that he used to research an industry for years together to portray its nitty gritties accurately. The Human element in these books is also very good with a slew of characters facing challenges and moral dilemmas frequently. He starts by describing a slow paced day and then switches on to a fast paced narrative once a few incidents happen (typically accidents). This also gives it an exciting thriller feel to it. And since most of his books were written in the 60s and 70s, there is also a historical aspect to these books now. Apart from these, each of his books are set in different cities and he does an excellent job describing the city, local traditions, architecture etc. In this book, the key character is Peter McDermott, the Asst. General Manager of the St.Gregory Hotel, which is struggling to compete with the new efficient Hotel chains. He has work with the hotel owner Mr.Trent, customers, other management and employees like the waiters and bellboys charging more etc . He also deals with accidents and crimes and even the sensitive issue of racial discrimination (considering that the book was written in 1965, it must have been a hot topic then with the desegregation laws just coming into effect). Overall, an excellent read, especially if you are curious about how things work in different industries. Even if you aren't curious, the fast paced narrative part itself is very good and is comparable to any good thriller.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Judy

    Surprisingly enjoyable 1965 bestseller set in a New Orleans hotel. It even included a Civil Rights event in the plot. Best of all was learning all the details about what goes on behind the scenes in hotels.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mandy Radley

    I hadn't realised that this book was first published in the 1960's, I remember it being around with all the other blockbuster books in the 80's, maybe this was when the mini series came out. Anyway I spotted it in Amazon before Christmas and I've always wanted to read it, so downloaded it. The book follows a number of characters over 5 days from Monday to Friday, either working or visiting the St Gregory Hotel in New Orleans. Friday being DDay for the owner. He has to come up with a refinancing I hadn't realised that this book was first published in the 1960's, I remember it being around with all the other blockbuster books in the 80's, maybe this was when the mini series came out. Anyway I spotted it in Amazon before Christmas and I've always wanted to read it, so downloaded it. The book follows a number of characters over 5 days from Monday to Friday, either working or visiting the St Gregory Hotel in New Orleans. Friday being DDay for the owner. He has to come up with a refinancing package or accept a buy out from a hotel chain otherwise the bank forecloses. Running alongside this story is the one of a mother and child being killed in a hit and run accident. The hotel also has a professional thief hitting on the guests. The convention of dentists are in uproar as the hotel discriminates against coloured people, plus a few other stories. Everything comes to a thrilling and horrific conclusion on the Friday afternoon. Even though it was a little dated I thoroughly enjoyed it, so much so my partner was asking, WHEN ARE YOU TURNING THE LIGHT OUT, at 11.30pm last night. I only hope my pen friend of around 35 years who now lives on the Isle of Bute and I've just found out she is also reading this, having bought it her mum for Christmas, as she wanted to read it, enjoys it as much as I have.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Suby

    I read this book some 40 years back. Already the world of hospitality was being taken over by Hotel Chains. One hotel stood alone independently and this book is about all aspects of hotel management, its struggle for survival and how a discredited manager of the hotel eventually gets into the good books of a millionaire who purchases the place and puts him in charge of the place so that it can continue to function as an independent entity. A marvelous book to read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Diana Wilson

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book from start to finish. I literally couldn’t wait to find out what was happening at The Hotel each time I picked the book up. The comprehensive characters, the fascinating inner workings of a large hotel in the 1960s and the blatant race discrimination of the time were just a few of the things I found so interesting. Entertaining,educational and thought provoking.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Mitton

    I love Arthur Hailey works and read this one when it first came out. Seem tame now by today's standards but was a hot read at the time.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rudra Narayan Lenka

    Although the book is written in 1965,this book is recommended to those who is keen to learn about hotel business & their day to day activities in those times.well researched & very meticulously written,it will not bore you.this book kept me turning page as the writer have also introduced his detective point of view which is evident of the writers creativity.so i enjoyed the book. Although the book is written in 1965,this book is recommended to those who is keen to learn about hotel business & their day to day activities in those times.well researched & very meticulously written,it will not bore you.this book kept me turning page as the writer have also introduced his detective point of view which is evident of the writers creativity.so i enjoyed the book.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rohan Murray

    A thoroughly enjoyable read. I loved learning about the inner workings of a hotel (a staple of Hailey's books - whether it be an airport, bank or newspaper) told through a number of well developed characters. The separate but closely linked stories of these characters come together in the finale with enough surprises and twists to keep the reader turning the pages. Sure, it's pretty outdated now (written nearly 50 years ago) but this is not actually a drawback, rather a nostalgic insight into ho A thoroughly enjoyable read. I loved learning about the inner workings of a hotel (a staple of Hailey's books - whether it be an airport, bank or newspaper) told through a number of well developed characters. The separate but closely linked stories of these characters come together in the finale with enough surprises and twists to keep the reader turning the pages. Sure, it's pretty outdated now (written nearly 50 years ago) but this is not actually a drawback, rather a nostalgic insight into how hotels use to operate and in many ways, it would appear, not that much has actually changed! Interestingly, almost all of the predictions of one of the main characters (Hotel magnate Curtis O'Keefe) made for hotels of the future (most likely our current hotels) have never come to pass. It's still good old fashioned service and people that are seemingly the most important elements in a successful hotel and perhaps it will remain that way for a long time to come.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    Reasons I liked this story: 1. The setting is the St. Gregory Hotel in 1960's New Orleans. The civil rights movement plays a part in this story and desegregation is thoughtfully looked at considering this book was published in 1965 (the reason why I shelved it as "Contemporary Fiction" rather than "Historical Fiction"). 2. Incredibly well-researched story! I sure learned a lot about the inner workings of a hotel and have developed a new appreciation for all the behind-the-scenes! 3. Excellent plot! Reasons I liked this story: 1. The setting is the St. Gregory Hotel in 1960's New Orleans. The civil rights movement plays a part in this story and desegregation is thoughtfully looked at considering this book was published in 1965 (the reason why I shelved it as "Contemporary Fiction" rather than "Historical Fiction"). 2. Incredibly well-researched story! I sure learned a lot about the inner workings of a hotel and have developed a new appreciation for all the behind-the-scenes! 3. Excellent plot! Fast-paced and suspenseful to the end! 4. Well-developed antagonists! I especially enjoyed reading about "Keycase" Milne and his story as a professional thief. How he plotted robberies, cased hotels, gained entry, dealt with incriminating evidence - all quite intriguing! Go, Keycase! Reasons why I thought this story was "meh": 1. Protagonist Peter McDermott - although I rooted for him in his professional role, personally, he was a sexist pig! He really enjoyed the attentions from attractive females, but he wouldn't think of "hitting" on his personal secretary, Flora (an extremely competent worker, by the way), because she was in her 40s (Peter is 32) and somewhat unfortunate-looking. And why can't Christine be his new assistant general manager? Why does it have to be another male? Which brings me to ... 2. Christine Francis (personal assistant to the owner) - one of the main characters, but too one-dimensional. I would have liked to hear her story! 3. Love triangle between Christine-Peter-nineteen-year old (Ewww!) Marsha - too cheesy and irritating! Grow up, Peter! 4. The author was inconsistent when writing Frenchman sous-chef Andre Lemieux's English dialect (sometimes he would drop the "h" from the beginning of words, sometimes not, among other niggling dialect issues). I remember watching the TV series back in the 1980s based on this book starring James Brolin. Overall, I enjoyed this story because in my opinion, the pros outweigh the cons.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Arvind Srinivasan

    Typical arthur hailey book which had a simple story with lot of explanation on how hotels work and what are the intricacies of it. Some of the ending, though morally not right but makes us realise life goes that way (not always the right things happens for the right and vice versa). If not for the explanation on how hotel function and its difficulties the book would be just 2 star but giving that knowledge of difficulties of running hotel this book gets that extra. The way I will conduct myself in Typical arthur hailey book which had a simple story with lot of explanation on how hotels work and what are the intricacies of it. Some of the ending, though morally not right but makes us realise life goes that way (not always the right things happens for the right and vice versa). If not for the explanation on how hotel function and its difficulties the book would be just 2 star but giving that knowledge of difficulties of running hotel this book gets that extra. The way I will conduct myself in a hotel will change a bit after this.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    This book started tepidly but then built to a boil and I enjoyed every second of it. Give it 50 pages, trust me. It’s very dated but in a way it’s not at all. The treatment of African Americans and women in this novel is of the south in the 1960s when Hotel was written and so the language and stereotypes is of the era and offensive, however, the battle Arthur Hailey writes of (his specific reference is to the desegregation of hotels) is still being waged in the modern hospitality industry in oth This book started tepidly but then built to a boil and I enjoyed every second of it. Give it 50 pages, trust me. It’s very dated but in a way it’s not at all. The treatment of African Americans and women in this novel is of the south in the 1960s when Hotel was written and so the language and stereotypes is of the era and offensive, however, the battle Arthur Hailey writes of (his specific reference is to the desegregation of hotels) is still being waged in the modern hospitality industry in other and similar ways as in… when was the last time you saw anyone other than a white person used in an advertisement for a Caribbean resort? It’s still all white sand and white skin with plenty of exploitative practices to go around. Unlike my other favorite hotel book from the same era, Don't Stop the Carnival, Hailey uses his protagonist to take a stand against such things and his own writing creates an authentic story of the time that supports the desegregation of New Orleans hotels. So that’s how he is on skin color, however, all of his female characters are completely stereotypical of male writers of the era and serve to do nothing other than fight for the love of, entertain, and comfort the male characters. I’m very curious to see since my copy is a first edition from 1965 if the newer printing of this in 2014 has any updates to the language. The story takes place in a grand (think: Fairmont New Orleans) hotel over the course of just 4.5 days and you’re introduced to and get to know a host of employees from owners, management, chefs, housekeepers, elevator operators, and more in addition to a slew of guests and each emerges with their own fascinating character arc which is one of the many reasons I find hotels to be such intriguing places. Where else are so many different humans from so many disparate geographic, economic, and culturally different places & backgrounds thrown together in such an intimate way? This book shows that to perfection, it moves flawlessly between back of house to front, all while building an unforgettable plot to a crescendo that will leave you breathless.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Cindy O

    I never realized what all had to happen behind the scenes at upscale hotels to keep them running efficiently, profitably and still keep it classy. This book was an eye opener to me and I loved the story and the people. Arthur Hailey is a wonderful author and has a true gift of storytelling. . This is of course an older book and I have been enjoying going back in time a little to catch up on books that I missed when I was growing up. The books that I remember seeing on my parents book shelves I ca I never realized what all had to happen behind the scenes at upscale hotels to keep them running efficiently, profitably and still keep it classy. This book was an eye opener to me and I loved the story and the people. Arthur Hailey is a wonderful author and has a true gift of storytelling. . This is of course an older book and I have been enjoying going back in time a little to catch up on books that I missed when I was growing up. The books that I remember seeing on my parents book shelves I can now truly appreciate.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Xiao

    It definitely got better when the stories got to unfold themselves. The book revealed vividly the scenes in a hotel which were usually not known to the general public. Extremely realistic and thought-provoking, it truly did a extraordinary job in, as the author put it himself, “presenting an exposed slice of life.” The four stars may be a little unfair because, after several decades, there are almost for sure certain things that a modern taste would dislike, e.g. many a stereotypical character, It definitely got better when the stories got to unfold themselves. The book revealed vividly the scenes in a hotel which were usually not known to the general public. Extremely realistic and thought-provoking, it truly did a extraordinary job in, as the author put it himself, “presenting an exposed slice of life.” The four stars may be a little unfair because, after several decades, there are almost for sure certain things that a modern taste would dislike, e.g. many a stereotypical character, a somewhat predictable plot which I’m sure it’s novel and riveting in the past when it’s not a cliche yet, and etc.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    Most of “Hotel” by Arthur Hailey felt like a stroll through the humid French Quarter on a July afternoon. Long and lazy, taking in history along the way but in no hurry to get to the next destination. The last thirty pages however were more like Fat Tuesday at 11:00 p.m. with drinks and revelry a flyin’- but it still wasn’t enough to redeem the book. Some may remember “Hotel” was an 80s TV series like Love Boat and Fantasy Island where characters rolled in, had a crisis and rolled out w a soluti Most of “Hotel” by Arthur Hailey felt like a stroll through the humid French Quarter on a July afternoon. Long and lazy, taking in history along the way but in no hurry to get to the next destination. The last thirty pages however were more like Fat Tuesday at 11:00 p.m. with drinks and revelry a flyin’- but it still wasn’t enough to redeem the book. Some may remember “Hotel” was an 80s TV series like Love Boat and Fantasy Island where characters rolled in, had a crisis and rolled out w a solution all under an hour. Having waited tables in a number of hotels I was hoping for more behind the scenes scoop on the biz but was sadly disappointed. Some references to women and other minorities show the author’s dated attitude (it was published in 1965) in full swing.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Anne (Booklady) Molinarolo

    3.5 Stars A bit too long, in my opinion, but an engrossing read about 5 days in the grand and luxurious St. Gregory Hotel in New Orleans. We learn about the fate of the hotel (almost bankrupt because of mismanagement and the corruption of some hotel employees), guests secrets, thefts, and some bigotry of mid 1960's New Orleans.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Liuba

    I have not met characters so alive for a long time. Even though nothing was surprising for me it was really good to see how destiny lines intertwine. And I just proved myself one more time that I like hotel business very much and all aspects of it are fascinating.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Manan

    Nice to read some fiction for a change. Story is good but predictable storyline.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    It’s one of the most enjoyable books I have ever read. Absolutely fascinating. I was truly engaged, intrigued and couldn’t put it aside. Highly recommend!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mary March

    Outstanding!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    Wow, an oldie that I somehow never picked up! Thoroughly enjoyed this book and how the little storylines all came together. I will be reading more Arthur Hailey in 2020, for sure!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Elena

    Everyone should read this. Not only entertaining but all the behind the scenes drama of a hotel is spot on accurate. 5 stars.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Faye

    I really enjoyed this one. A slow start but I kept working at it and became invested in the characters and the storylines. Couldn’t put it down toward the end. I wish there was more!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    Great read...I really enjoyed Hotel. Hailey does a great job of intervening multiple storylines around the daily comings and goings of a New Orleans Hotel. The story is engaging and the characters are interesting. Just a good book all around. As a testament, as I finished this morning on the train, I was legitimately agitated the whole trip as events culminated. Stressful day at the office may have an impact on this, but I think it was due to the events to come. Not as suspenseful as others I ha Great read...I really enjoyed Hotel. Hailey does a great job of intervening multiple storylines around the daily comings and goings of a New Orleans Hotel. The story is engaging and the characters are interesting. Just a good book all around. As a testament, as I finished this morning on the train, I was legitimately agitated the whole trip as events culminated. Stressful day at the office may have an impact on this, but I think it was due to the events to come. Not as suspenseful as others I have read, but yet it had me nervous. I became less so after the major events ended. So, I think it was the book. As good as the story is, the day to day operations is equally fascinating. This may prove boring for some, but I find the inner-workings of a place such as a hotel interesting. Equally, some of the engagements of bell-boys, waiters, bartenders, etc. that were reviewed were also enjoyable. Oddly, I found myself yawning during the review of the kitchen and food service. This is either because of my short, non-distinguished career in the industry or that it simply came too late in the novel and was merely delaying the story. Being written in 1965, it's dated. At one point, they review the hotel of the future and it is curious to see some of those items have come to pass, while others, not so much. But being from 1965, its also an awesome time capsule. The hotel of the sixties is not the hotel of 2013. The charm, which even then was fading, is mostly gone. As is the service. Even the old, historic hotels still open today, lack the charm of the St. Gregory. Having just spent a night with the family at the Eagle Mountain House in Jackson, NH, I'm reminded of this. Seeing the hotel and imagining it as it was in the 1940s versus today. The charm, while still there, lacks a certain something. That feeling of dissonence is captured in Hotel. I have no real complaints. Is it dated...somewhat. I don't care though. Is it predictable? Somewhat. Some of the events are obvious, others not so much. I actually called a major plot device early on in the story which I wouldn't think was obvious (not stating here to avoid spoilers). But in general, the hotel carries the story so that predictable plots are dismissable. Hotel read something like a Erle Stanley Garnder (perry mason). Although, that may be because of the period of time. Legitimately pleased to have read this. I'm not surprised to hear it became a TV show and movie, although I am surprised we haven't seen a Hotel reality show yet. I picked up Hotel a few months ago at the Glen Rock library take-a-book/leave-a-book exchange. I generally see nothing there, and one night bumped into about 4-5 interesting possibilities. I actually went home and picked out a few books to trade in. Overall, exceptionally pleased this was one of them. Oddly, a few days later I saw it again in a different exchange. Side note, the cover represented is not the one I read. Mine was the 1965 Dell paperback. White cover, Author's name at the top, title at the bottom. A picture of a hotel stretched from the cover to the binding.

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