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The Amazing Spider-Man: Coming Home

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Through his life, Peter Parker has often felt alone. When he first discovered his spider-like abilities after being bitten by a radioactive spider, he kept them secret. His attempts to exploit them for profit resulted in his Uncle Ben's murder. It seemed as though no one understood the difficult balance between mortal and hero. Until now, that is. A mysterious figure appear Through his life, Peter Parker has often felt alone. When he first discovered his spider-like abilities after being bitten by a radioactive spider, he kept them secret. His attempts to exploit them for profit resulted in his Uncle Ben's murder. It seemed as though no one understood the difficult balance between mortal and hero. Until now, that is. A mysterious figure appears suddenly, exhibiting similar powers to Peter. Who is this mystery man? Who are the people he represents? And what is this ancient evil that has arrived in America in search for Peter?


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Through his life, Peter Parker has often felt alone. When he first discovered his spider-like abilities after being bitten by a radioactive spider, he kept them secret. His attempts to exploit them for profit resulted in his Uncle Ben's murder. It seemed as though no one understood the difficult balance between mortal and hero. Until now, that is. A mysterious figure appear Through his life, Peter Parker has often felt alone. When he first discovered his spider-like abilities after being bitten by a radioactive spider, he kept them secret. His attempts to exploit them for profit resulted in his Uncle Ben's murder. It seemed as though no one understood the difficult balance between mortal and hero. Until now, that is. A mysterious figure appears suddenly, exhibiting similar powers to Peter. Who is this mystery man? Who are the people he represents? And what is this ancient evil that has arrived in America in search for Peter?

30 review for The Amazing Spider-Man: Coming Home

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sean Barrs

    I’ve not read a great deal of graphic novels. I’m slowly worming my way into the genre by reading one a week. So far it’s been quite slow. I’ve enjoyed a couple, but I’ve not felt an inclination to pursue reading them for much longer. That’s changed. I read this and I now consider myself a comic book fan. Now, I know what you’re thinking: how can I consider myself a comic book fan when I’ve read so little? Well the answer is simple; this is the first comic I’ve read that has made me want to seri I’ve not read a great deal of graphic novels. I’m slowly worming my way into the genre by reading one a week. So far it’s been quite slow. I’ve enjoyed a couple, but I’ve not felt an inclination to pursue reading them for much longer. That’s changed. I read this and I now consider myself a comic book fan. Now, I know what you’re thinking: how can I consider myself a comic book fan when I’ve read so little? Well the answer is simple; this is the first comic I’ve read that has made me want to seriously go and read a load more. That makes me a fan, right? My reading list just got even longer! I’m tempted to sign up to this collection. Just look at the art on the spines. These guys really know how to rope people in. I seriously need these in my life, like now! I wouldn’t consider myself a literary snob, far from it, but I’ve always been somewhat reproachful to comics. The medium has always felt, well, rather childish. And that’s coming from someone who reads children’s literature on occasion. This label is by no means true. This comic dealt with some very adult issues in such an approachable way; it was so much fun! Who’d of thought I’d go on to discuss literary themes in a spider-man comic off all things? Well, here goes. Spider-man is alone. He’s a loner. He is subjugated to lonerism. Ha! I just made up a word! The super hero feels isolated from the world. As a teenager he was a science-geek; he was pounded on at school because of this. He had no real solid friends. As an adult he wears a mask. Few people actually know him. Now this is where their writers really play on this reader’s sympathy. I felt like they were directly tying to associate spider-man with an assumed reader. They created an inspiring figure, a nerd who stands up for other nerds. They relate him to other nerds in the comic, and, at the same time, try to have him identify with the reader. It was really quite cool; it creates an intimate relationship with the character. Is intimate a bad word to use? Probably. But, I think you get my point: this comic was written for people who have a little bit of the young Peter in them. Spider-man also has serious daddy/uncle issues. He’s constantly seeking a strong paternal figure, but not naively. No. He’s looking for inspiration, and he finds it too. It’s in a man not unlike himself. The two team up to tackle an evil deathlord vampire type thing. It’s a good show down; it really conveyed all Spidey’s worries and emotions in the action. It’s quite an effective story. Though I was a little disappointed when they revealed the fate of Spidey’s new friend so early. I think it would have kept me in a greater deal of suspense had I not known the outcome till the next volume. Well, either way, the story was still good and I feel like I’ve been converted to the comic book world. So, that’s very good indeed. More comics for me in the future!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jaz Ramos

    I'm giving this 5 stars because it was amazing... Get it? Amazing? I am so sorry.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Cameron

    There are two ways, that I know of, to re-imagine a superhero's origin. One way is to start completely from the beginning, changing, altering and adding to the characters already established story. This is a technique Spider-Man has seen a lot of. The second approach is to retroactively insert details or ideas into the origin that changes the story without altering events we're already familiar with. That's the technique JMS tries to employ in this volume of Spider-Man's "Amazing" brand. While I There are two ways, that I know of, to re-imagine a superhero's origin. One way is to start completely from the beginning, changing, altering and adding to the characters already established story. This is a technique Spider-Man has seen a lot of. The second approach is to retroactively insert details or ideas into the origin that changes the story without altering events we're already familiar with. That's the technique JMS tries to employ in this volume of Spider-Man's "Amazing" brand. While I appreciate the approach that's taken, I can't say that it works very well. Spider-Man and science go hand-in-hand (not necessarily science fact, but still science in a sense). A large majority of his villains can be put into the "science gone wrong" category, Spidey himself is the victim in part of such an origin, he invents high tech gadgets, and multiple jobs he's had over the years revolve around science. Now, I won't try and say that everything has to stay the same and nothing can change, but the attempt here to turn Spider-Man's origin into a mystical one doesn't rest well with me. The overall scientific feel behind the character works really well and while there are certainly mystical aspects surrounding him, the insertion of the element here in such a crucial part of his story just doesn't fit. At least not if you ask me. That misstep isn't enough to completely mar the experience, however. JMS writes an overall entertaining story, far from perfect though it may be. For one, he writes excellent dialogue. He really nails the balance between witty banter and serious colloquy that makes Peter such an entertaining character. He also weaves a decently suspenseful tale here. It's far from the best example, but JMS's rendition of the "Spider-Man refusing to give up in a hopeless situation" story is no doubt entertaining. It lacks heart though. Spidey's motivation for his persistence is a bit too distant to really affect the reader the way the best of this type of story can. On the art side of things, Romita Jr's pencils are equal parts good and bad. On one hand, when the costumes are on and the fists are flying, the art is great. The nearly three issue long action scene is wonderfully drawn in a way that almost makes you feel the impacts. On the other hand, characters often times feel anatomically...weird. And faces seem a bit off. I realize those aren't the most descriptive critiques, but trust me, the people in this book are odd. What's not odd and totally awesome, however, is the coloring. Each and every page is filled with beautifully vibrant and brilliant colors. Very nearly the best part of the book. Coming Home is a Spidey tale that does what it gets right really well and what it gets wrong really not well. It's not hard to recommend to a Spidey fan, but others may want to look elsewhere. For now, at least.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Pantelis Andreou

    Perfect starting point for amazing spider-man!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    This is my first ever time writing a Goodreads review, so please be gentle. So, my sister is a social worker and her clients are all NGRI cases. NGRI as in "not guilty by reason of insanity" (Yes, it is a real thing and no, you cannot fake the defense in a court of law, like it frequently appears on TV). Unbeknownst to me, one of her clients in the state mental hospital gifted her this book for her nephew, apparently, because it had come up in conversation that he likes super heroes and she, in This is my first ever time writing a Goodreads review, so please be gentle. So, my sister is a social worker and her clients are all NGRI cases. NGRI as in "not guilty by reason of insanity" (Yes, it is a real thing and no, you cannot fake the defense in a court of law, like it frequently appears on TV). Unbeknownst to me, one of her clients in the state mental hospital gifted her this book for her nephew, apparently, because it had come up in conversation that he likes super heroes and she, in turn, gave it to my son when he was over for a visit. This book had clearly been around the block, having been donated to the hospital from a library ages ago and passing through countless hands of the seriously mentally ill before arriving in my son's hands. Miraculously, all of the pages were intact (having clearly been taped over the years, etc.), but it did have some questionable sticky spots and other scuffs. My son was, of course, thrilled, but I couldn't help but want to wear a pair of nitrile gloves just to handle this thing. But herein lies the problem. My son is five. As in, preschool age. Now, I am not opposed to my kid being exposed to real-world stuff within reason and he does love super heroes, but this book is almost hilariously not suitable for a child of his age. Do I act like a "responsible" parent and explain to him that that it was a nice gift from Auntie's client, or do I throw caution to the wind and let him be exposed to this book that he was so excited about? I decided that instead of being an asshole parent in his eyes, that let him keep it, so it quickly became his first pick for bedtime reading. School shootings, excessive violence, some weird man running around without shoes... Jeez Louise, I should never have let this happen. I have never been a comic book reader and have no clue how to judge this version of Spider Man, which is why I'm going to go ahead and give it a middle of the road three stars, but the artwork was cool and the story kept both my five-year-old's attention and mine. I liked all of Spiderman/Peter Parker's internal dialog that he was having with himself. Somewhat surprisingly, the child did not find any of the subject matter scary. Now I'm stuck with the challenge of how to make this thing disappear, so that he will quickly forget it's existence and I won't have to worry about what mystery substances are covering this thing. The moral of the story is to never accept a comic book as a gift for a child from a man in a mental hospital and to sit down your sister and have a serious conversation about what reading material is appropriate for preschoolers, because this sure ain't it.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    J. Michael Straczynski's run on The Amazing Spider-Man is controversial and often falls under heavy criticism because of events that take place in the last few volumes, but we must keep in mind that this was a very strong run for several volumes, and this first installment is decent. Straczynski is given the task of returning Peter Parker to the role of Spider-Man after a lengthy absence and sets up some themes that will be important through his run on the series. In this volume we are introduce J. Michael Straczynski's run on The Amazing Spider-Man is controversial and often falls under heavy criticism because of events that take place in the last few volumes, but we must keep in mind that this was a very strong run for several volumes, and this first installment is decent. Straczynski is given the task of returning Peter Parker to the role of Spider-Man after a lengthy absence and sets up some themes that will be important through his run on the series. In this volume we are introduced to a new ally and a new enemy. There's a lot to like here, I like Ezekiel and the notion that Peter's spider powers are totemic. I like the way Peter becomes a teacher and how the issues of a rough, urban public school are dealt with by the material. Peter is characterized on spot and often very funny. Now here's what I didn't like. Morlun is a painfully lame villain. There is absolutely nothing to him. He's got no personality and his use as a threat is the clichéd unstoppable hunter. It feels like such an easy road to take. "You've never faced a threat like this before!!!" Well, I'd argue that he has, but even overlooking that, it's a lazy approach to making the threat seem formidable. We're told that Peter can't possibly survive a confrontation with Morlun, but we the readers know he'll be okay. When Peter realizes how serious his problem is, he never does the logical thing and ask for help from The Avengers, Dr. Strange, The Fantastic Four or any number of super-hero allies he has right within the city, friends who would surely even the odds drastically. Even if Peter was too proud to ask for help, Morlun's activities are wrecking the city and causing all manner of damage, death and injury. He would unquestionably raised the attention of New York's Marvel super-heroes not to mention the police.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tom A.

    Plague Review 4: The Amazing Spider-Man: Coming Home by J. Michael Straczynski, John Romita Jr., and Scott Hanna Do you know what I miss the most in comics? Good storytelling. None of this present allergic and juvenile reaction to a horny orange man's victory is ever going to be considered as great writing, not in a billion years. They have made a mess of iconic characters, putting their political preferences and biases first in place of actual storytelling. The dearth of talent in the Comic Bo Plague Review 4: The Amazing Spider-Man: Coming Home by J. Michael Straczynski, John Romita Jr., and Scott Hanna Do you know what I miss the most in comics? Good storytelling. None of this present allergic and juvenile reaction to a horny orange man's victory is ever going to be considered as great writing, not in a billion years. They have made a mess of iconic characters, putting their political preferences and biases first in place of actual storytelling. The dearth of talent in the Comic Book industry has led me to seek out the once-great comic stories for the last decade in the hopes of rekindling my love for iconic characters the new "writers" butcher monthly. (Do people even read their garbage?) Then I remembered; In 2002, we got just that: a mature, thrilling, and exciting new take on an iconic character. Spider-Man was in a slump. The last decade before this run was mired in a storytelling hell known as the "Clone Saga" and it effectively destroyed and made a mockery of Spider-Man's character. Then it was slowly rebuilt, but it never quite rose above the other Marvel titles post-Heroes Return (Compare it, let's say, to Kurt Busiek's Avengers or Dan Jurgen's underrated Thor run). Then after a change of Marvel's Editor-in-Chief, Straczynski was brought in to revitalize the title. He did more than that. Straczynski's run brought new exciting things and all of them were innovative and great. We had Peter Parker finally evolving into a mature adult, carrying more responsibility on his shoulders by becoming a high school science teacher to a bunch of alienated public school kids. We had the enigmatic Ezekiel, an older version of Peter who first questions Peter on the nature of his origin ("Did the Radiation enable the spider to give you these powers? Or was the Spider trying to give you those powers before the radiation killed it? Which came first? The Radiation? Or the Power? The chicken or the egg of the power?") before warning him of a great threat in the form of the vampire Morlun. We also explored the mystical and esoteric lore behind Peter's powers, a great turn considering that the comics in the past were always focused on the scientific part. Oh, and Straczynski also revitalized Aunt May's role, making her less of a feeble old heart attack-prone old lady to an active part of Peter's life. For this TPB, Straczynski brings mystery, action, horror, heart, and a lot of true heroism to the forefront: every issue brings something new and interesting, making the talking scenes between the characters as scintillating as the scenes involving stopping the usual robberies, school shootings, etc. Straczynski's writing is literate and informative, filled with allusions to the bible, ("Congratulations Sunshine… You just reaped the whirlwind.") and discussions on the need of mankind to wear totems to be something stronger. This is the real mature storytelling; forget the dumb (but funny) gore of most MAX comics during this period. The battle scenes (drawn by Romita Jr.) are epic and brutal, with Spider-Man getting mercilessly beaten most of the time by Morlun. There's actual horror, too. One of the main goals of Morlun is to hunt down Spidey, and when he gets his scent he is relentless. So relentless that Straczynski makes us feel as hopeless as Spidey when he tries to run away from this unstoppable and very hungry force. But of course, Spidey finds a way out. Do you love good storytelling in comics? Then read this one.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Phillip Berrie

    I'm an old Marvel comic book reader and as part of my second childhood I've subscribed to this series to get a nice collectible set of memories. I was also hoping to be brought up to date with the parts of Marvel's comic book canon that have changed since I stopped reading the comics. I am also a great fan of J Michael Straczynski's work in Babylon 5 and therefore looked forward to the first issue in the series where he teams up with John Romita JR to tell the Spider-man story 'Coming Home'. Unfo I'm an old Marvel comic book reader and as part of my second childhood I've subscribed to this series to get a nice collectible set of memories. I was also hoping to be brought up to date with the parts of Marvel's comic book canon that have changed since I stopped reading the comics. I am also a great fan of J Michael Straczynski's work in Babylon 5 and therefore looked forward to the first issue in the series where he teams up with John Romita JR to tell the Spider-man story 'Coming Home'. Unfortunately, my expectations weren't met. Let's deal with the artwork first. I'm not a great fan of Romita JR's art. There's nothing wrong with it, I just prefer a simpler more graphically realistic style. This is purely personal preference and if you like this artist's work this will be a plus for you. Now onto the story. Straczynski tries to break new ground by putting a mystical spin on spider-man's origin and it just didn't grab me the same way some of the other great spider-man stories have. Mind you, it wasn't all bad. I thought Straczynski's observation about the common theme of Spider-man's enemies was very clever and I also liked how Peter Parker, in a sense, defies his supposed mystical origin to resolve the story, though that resolution made the scientist in me cringe. What I didn't like was the Earth-based origin story for the major villain. Why haven't we seen this guy before? He's been around long enough and should be a major player in the world. To my mind, this character should have been given an off-Earth origin in line with his mystical nature. The other gripe I have is that, considering the duration of the epic battle through the streets of New York - a place which has more than its fair share of superheroes - I had trouble believing that no other hero came along to intervene in the fight and protect the innocents that were endangered by the villain. Anyway, I suppose it's still worth a read if you're a spider-man fan, but I am now hanging out for some of the other stories in this series.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dickydavis

    Hard to not give this 5 stars, despite it being a very different animal to the other 5 star books on my list. However, I feel it deserves it as being one of the most interesting, original, and downright enjoyable Spidey stories for a long time; Amazing NEEDED a breath of fresh air, and JMS was the right man for the job. Plus the issue-long slugfest halfway through will not only have you on the edge of your seat, but is one of the most smartly written superhero punch-ups you will ever see. Spidey Hard to not give this 5 stars, despite it being a very different animal to the other 5 star books on my list. However, I feel it deserves it as being one of the most interesting, original, and downright enjoyable Spidey stories for a long time; Amazing NEEDED a breath of fresh air, and JMS was the right man for the job. Plus the issue-long slugfest halfway through will not only have you on the edge of your seat, but is one of the most smartly written superhero punch-ups you will ever see. Spidey is hopelessly overmatched, yet still finds ways to desperately hold his own and keep going, even getting you to believe he might have a chance of winning...

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mike Thomas

    This is an excellent graphic novel, the first in a new series by Marvel. The story and artwork is top class, and the book itself is hardback and very nicely bound and presented, well worth the introductary price of £2.99. To be honest I looked up some of the upcoming stories in the series and found that the paperback versions of these graphic novels sell for about £12 - £15 each. This series normal price is £9.99 a novel, which are all hardback and are cheaper than the stores, very unusual and v This is an excellent graphic novel, the first in a new series by Marvel. The story and artwork is top class, and the book itself is hardback and very nicely bound and presented, well worth the introductary price of £2.99. To be honest I looked up some of the upcoming stories in the series and found that the paperback versions of these graphic novels sell for about £12 - £15 each. This series normal price is £9.99 a novel, which are all hardback and are cheaper than the stores, very unusual and very impressive for a collectors series. All in all highly recommended.......

  11. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    3.5 stars. Enjoyable re-imagining of Spider-man. It is always risky when you take an iconic figure and show him in a brand new light and Straczynski handles it beautifully. Recommended!!!!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Derrick

    For a group challenge, I needed an Eisner winner. This one won Best Serialized Story of 2002. It was easily accessible on Marvel Digital Unlimited, and it's also the beginning of the JMS run that I have meant to read for years. Excellent stuff. I don't know what was going on before these issues, but it's clear we're experiencing a sea change in Peter's life. He's lost MJ, and he has a new job as a science teacher. Plus, some dude named Ezekiel has shown up and fed him all kinds of wacky info abo For a group challenge, I needed an Eisner winner. This one won Best Serialized Story of 2002. It was easily accessible on Marvel Digital Unlimited, and it's also the beginning of the JMS run that I have meant to read for years. Excellent stuff. I don't know what was going on before these issues, but it's clear we're experiencing a sea change in Peter's life. He's lost MJ, and he has a new job as a science teacher. Plus, some dude named Ezekiel has shown up and fed him all kinds of wacky info about animal totems. JMS gets Peter's voice exactly right. Like most comedians, Peter uses humor to mask his own pain. That comes through on every page, as Peter deals with his own memories of bullying and eventually has to face a seemingly invincible foe. In fact, Peter's battles with Morlund remind me of Batman vs Bane in the Knightfall story. JR, Jr's art has for my money never been better. There's humor and action and variety. It's gorgeous work. I'll have to read some more of this run. Oh, and that last page, though!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sebastian Alanya

    What an amazing experience! Reading my first Spider-Man comic and I'm very satisfied!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ivan Lex

    I don't understand why I haven't read this before ... Honestly, this is one of the best stories I've read about Spider-man (and I've read a lot). I feel like this comic is necessary if you want to better understand some arcs like "The Other" and "Spiderverse" basically this book introduces Morlun, and all that totem shit, but it's not just that, it's a brilliant graphic novel! To begin with, we have a much more mature Peter Parker in many ways, I have read many stages of the arachnid, but I don't understand why I haven't read this before ... Honestly, this is one of the best stories I've read about Spider-man (and I've read a lot). I feel like this comic is necessary if you want to better understand some arcs like "The Other" and "Spiderverse" basically this book introduces Morlun, and all that totem shit, but it's not just that, it's a brilliant graphic novel! To begin with, we have a much more mature Peter Parker in many ways, I have read many stages of the arachnid, but this is certainly where I have felt him more as a "responsible" adult who knows what to do, a version that would make Uncle Ben extremely proud. Peter returns to his Highschool to see how things are going, and he realizes that for kids like him things get even more complicated in the present, crime and deterioration have grown in the area. the teachers are interested just in cashing a check but not in guiding the new generation, all of this can lead to the young minds approaching the dark side, so Pete decides to add one more profession to his huge resume and becomes a science teacher. On the other hand a new and mysterious character (Ezequiel) appears out of nowhere, this old man who has the same spider powers comes to warn Peter about a great danger ... Morlun. In the end we have one of our friendly neighbor best battles as he faces a much stronger enemy who seems invincible (this doesn't seem like a new thing, but here you certainly feel that way) in a way that actually is so ingenious. Without a doubt, this book by Straczynski is a jewel of modern comics, as well as being the prelude to all the important events of Spider-man of the last two decades. Finally I want to mention that I have never been a fan of Romita Jr.'s art but in this book his work is very good, he gives the illustrations the right dynamism and composition to create a perfect atmosphere!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    I checked this out from my library because it helps me get my comic book "fix" to read an occassional graphic novel. My first reaction is that I am so incredibly under-impressed with the "style" of art in comic books/graphic novels today. I don't know if this style has been defined in any of the comic-related media, but I think of it as "comic book dwarfism" -- body parts, particularly heads, often larger than the rest of the body. While the coloring and inking might be better than that from the I checked this out from my library because it helps me get my comic book "fix" to read an occassional graphic novel. My first reaction is that I am so incredibly under-impressed with the "style" of art in comic books/graphic novels today. I don't know if this style has been defined in any of the comic-related media, but I think of it as "comic book dwarfism" -- body parts, particularly heads, often larger than the rest of the body. While the coloring and inking might be better than that from the comics of the 70's-80's, they actually look less realistic to me. Then there is the story. While moderately well-told, I couldn't help scoffing at the notion of yet ANOTHER foe, bigger, badder, stronger than anything Spidey has ever faced. How often can we keep coming up with new villains that are more villainous than anything before? The "twist" was that Spidey had to use his brains to defeat this one, and not his might. But what the heck was up with the other super freak? Where did he come from? Why did he die in such a pathetic manner? Over-all pretty wimpy.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Luis T

    This book is about a teenager that got bitten by a spider that caused him to have spcial spider powers and now fights with evil and protects humans from danger.I liked this book a little so I gave it 4 stars.This book is fiction because a a spider can't give powers to a human.Ill recoend this book to my brother because he likes it a lot.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Blake

    One of my favorite artist working with one of my favorite writers. Even though I'm not a fan of Spider-Man, I love this graphic novel.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sebastian

    I found this comic book really good and engaging! It had a good storyline and was leading to a good end!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sina Tavoosi

    Amazing indeed.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Xavier Guillaume

    Woohoo! What an amazing book! I've been wanting to get back into Spider-Man, but I knew I had a lot of catching up to do. Not a clue where to start, I figured it might as well be with Vol. 1. :) Little did I know how good it was going to be though. In the beginning I wasn't sure what to make of it. The first issue (#30), was strange. Spider-Man talks to himself, he goes a little nuts, demolishes a building for no particular reason, makes a sexual innuendo about Reed Richards (Mr. Fantastic). It wa Woohoo! What an amazing book! I've been wanting to get back into Spider-Man, but I knew I had a lot of catching up to do. Not a clue where to start, I figured it might as well be with Vol. 1. :) Little did I know how good it was going to be though. In the beginning I wasn't sure what to make of it. The first issue (#30), was strange. Spider-Man talks to himself, he goes a little nuts, demolishes a building for no particular reason, makes a sexual innuendo about Reed Richards (Mr. Fantastic). It was all so strange. Then the humor kicked in, and I thought, Okay I can get into this. The next issue (#31), Peter Parker develops a new direction in his life, which I absolutely love. I think with Vol. 1 it makes sense to give Peter this new story. I feel it embellishes his likability. Spider-Man has always been a heroic figure. He always tries to do the right thing, ever since his Uncle Ben taught him about the importance of responsibility. I like how the comic book reminds us of this, because it's so important in understanding Spider-Man's character and motivation. Then we have this new direction for Peter, and I feel we as readers are watching the hero unfold into something more. A greater role-model not just as Spider-Man, but also as Peter Parker. Then we come to the third issue (#32), and this is where I fall absolutely in love with the art. The characters look vibrant and bold. The character designs feel fresh and modern. Each panel feels so full and alive. Sure, there are obvious flaws. For example, the illustration of Magneto was amateurish with its lack of proportions. However, I can easily look past these minor details because the illustrations of Spider-Man rock my socks. Spider-Man looks sleek and stealthy, much like a spider. Also, I can't help but feel some of the illustrations feel homosexually inspired. I can't put my finger on it, but maybe you can be the judge. Finally, we have to the last two issues (#33-34). This is what we've been waiting for because this is where the action lies. I love how everything just builds up in the previous 3 issues to this satisfying climax. Also, despite the actual fight between super-hero and super-villain being extremely drawn out, there are enough quiet lulls to make it work. That's good writing when there is a balance of action. Readers sometimes need a bit of a breather instead of just WHAM BAM BOOM the entire time. What else is most important is the fight scenes are intermixed with well-written exposition. You can't get better than that! In the end, this comic has achieved above and beyond my expectations. I suppose I didn't really know what to expect, so my bar was low. It was like a nice surprise. And just when I thought everything has come to the end, we get the final panel, which left me gasping in my seat. I honestly can't wait to find out what happens next. I think I have an idea, but I better wait to find out. All in all, I strongly recommend this book. It's a great place to start off if you're interested in getting into The Amazing Spider-Man. Hopefully, I haven't lifted your expectations too high. I would hate to disappoint. Just keep in mind that the comic isn't flawless, but it is definitely enjoyable if you're a Spider-Man fan or just a lover of heroic figures with a cheesy sense of humor. :)

  21. 4 out of 5

    Charles

    This was a special release, with a really special introductory offer price, and so I decided, why not? However, I am not accustomed to reading Graphic Novels and Comics... ...but I did enjoy my first time (though I have no idea if the cheap price had anything to do with it). I mean the artwork is amazing, detailed, sleek and modern, with a lot of nice touches here and there. The story?; hmm, well it is the usual story in these cases I guess. Remember, I am not a fan of graphic novels... A big, bu This was a special release, with a really special introductory offer price, and so I decided, why not? However, I am not accustomed to reading Graphic Novels and Comics... ...but I did enjoy my first time (though I have no idea if the cheap price had anything to do with it). I mean the artwork is amazing, detailed, sleek and modern, with a lot of nice touches here and there. The story?; hmm, well it is the usual story in these cases I guess. Remember, I am not a fan of graphic novels... A big, buff super-villain with, apparently no logical way to stop him?- Check. Another character who aids the super-hero to even the odds, although his motives are unclear?- Check. All hope seems lost?- Check. Hope regained, after a miraculous discovery which reveals the s-villain's only flaw?- Check. I may have never read a graphic novel in my life but I surprised myself by finding this embarrassingly predictable. 'Why the flapper-doodle did you give it five stars then?', you angrily yell. Well, it has some redeeming qualities to it, for sure. I found it to be in touch with human emotions, it had some comic dialogue (albeit very little, not too great considering this is Spiderman we are talking about) and it is engaging, a quality which most novelists must learn to do unfortunately. I do prefer a novel though, I find it goes way better with my cup of tea than a comic. The 2012 release, my edition, deserves four stars for its presentation alone though. It is hardbound, includes some 'extra' sections and artwork, and is of exceptional quality, especially when one considers its special, introductory price. The others will be more expensive, but even at that price I should think that they are good value for money, which is welcome especially considering that their target market is a little bit short on cash. I will give another chance to another graphic novel in these series, who knows? My first impressions were not all that bad. Maybe I'll be hooked someday.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Max's Comic Reviews and Lists

    J. Micheal Straczynski starts his apparently controversial run on Spiderman with this critically acclaimed first volume. Here we see an older middle-aged Peter Parker trying to make a name for himself as Peter Parker. He is reconciling his decision to be Spiderman but never giving up on it. This book is also a lot darker than I would have expected. Holy god. A very touchy topic is thrown in, and I don't know if it was necessary because it does not have an overbearing result on the story. I think J. Micheal Straczynski starts his apparently controversial run on Spiderman with this critically acclaimed first volume. Here we see an older middle-aged Peter Parker trying to make a name for himself as Peter Parker. He is reconciling his decision to be Spiderman but never giving up on it. This book is also a lot darker than I would have expected. Holy god. A very touchy topic is thrown in, and I don't know if it was necessary because it does not have an overbearing result on the story. I think the entire school sub-plot is the least interesting part. The rest of the story involving the characters Ezekiel and Morlun is damn entertaining, kick ass, and quite endearing. The idea of the Totemistic powers of animals and the motivations of Morlun is one I have heard before. I am glad Peter Parker becoming Spider-Man isn't some prophecy or some crap. The idea was handled well and did not take over the story like I thought it would. A lot of great dialogue comes from scenes Peter and Ezekiel discussing this topic. Although, we never find out why Ezekiel knows the information he does. Morlun as a villain was good because he was menacing and seemed like an unfeeling unstoppable force that did provide for a lengthy but bad-ass fight between him and Spider-Man. It flowed very well and had a very satisfying ending. Some of Morlun's lines I could have done without though. 2 in particular that I am almost certain that other people had a problem with as well. Peter Parker's narration is frickin awesome as well. You can tell he has grown a lot and definitely thinks as a bit of man-child. I love the ending because it's a great cliffhanger and makes you want to read volume two instantly. John Romita Jr. as I have said before in my Kick-Ass or Batman reviews is one of my favorite artists and has the most recognizable artwork in comics. He does a fantastic job here as always and all the great visuals he drew here hold up tremendously. Letter Grade: (B+)

  23. 4 out of 5

    Issam

    This volume brought me back as a Spider-Man fan (and back into comics) many years ago, when I first read it. I know that the spider-totem storyline isn't the most popular arc for Spidey fans, but I personally enjoyed it. This is the start of JMS's run on Spider-Man, which brings about the introduction of Ezekiel (an elderly man similar to Peter, with similar abilities), Peter's new role as a science teacher, and the continuation of Peter's adulthood with the 'every man' problems of marriage, mon This volume brought me back as a Spider-Man fan (and back into comics) many years ago, when I first read it. I know that the spider-totem storyline isn't the most popular arc for Spidey fans, but I personally enjoyed it. This is the start of JMS's run on Spider-Man, which brings about the introduction of Ezekiel (an elderly man similar to Peter, with similar abilities), Peter's new role as a science teacher, and the continuation of Peter's adulthood with the 'every man' problems of marriage, money, etc. These are some of the natural progressions of Peter's character that I found really interesting to read through. It's one of the things that I particularly love about this volume, especially since it's the point of the story where time doesn't forever stand still for Spider-Man. He isn't forever stuck in high school, working through the angst, living with his Aunt, or scrapping by on some freelance photos -- something we've seen a hundred times over. No, this is the next stage of Peter's life (as a married man, his shift as a mentor & role model for kids, etc) that mature and long-time readers can particularly enjoy and relate to. I won't go on to say that everything leading up to the Civil War storyline was exactly brilliant, but there are definitely some fine moments, and this volume is easily one of them. JMS really nails Peter's character and humor down. Add this to Romita Jr's artwork, and it really makes for a very worthy read. It's definitely a favourite of mine that I can easily recommend to anyone looking to get back into Spider-Man comics.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Neuer Goretzka

    main character well developed

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ekenedilichukwu Ikegwuani

    amazing. just purely amazing

  26. 4 out of 5

    Gavin

    A brand new Spidey here, with MJ gone off on her modelling life, and Peter not exactly enjoying living alone again. Peter runs into a man who has nearly all the same powers as he does, and speaks cryptically, disappearing just in time to leave him completely confused. Peter also stops by his old High School and his experiences there shake him so much, he decides to start teaching there to try and make a difference (which is much more superhero than a lot of things in many books). The bad guy in th A brand new Spidey here, with MJ gone off on her modelling life, and Peter not exactly enjoying living alone again. Peter runs into a man who has nearly all the same powers as he does, and speaks cryptically, disappearing just in time to leave him completely confused. Peter also stops by his old High School and his experiences there shake him so much, he decides to start teaching there to try and make a difference (which is much more superhero than a lot of things in many books). The bad guy in this one is a vampiric sort of very old creature who sucks the life essence from certain powerful people, and of course, he's on the hunt for Spidey. This is where the mysterious man who shares Peter's powers comes back into the story...there's a bit of cat and mouse between predator and prey here, and Peter isn't sure if he can trust this other mystery man either. The cat and mouse game covers a few issues, with Spidey getting his ass handed to him each time they fight, much as the mystery man had warned him would happen. Eventually Peter takes a drastic step which is the only thing he feels he has left that might defeat this unstoppable hungering man... That seems like a lot for one book, but that's not it; the very last page drops a bomb on the reader that's been waiting to happen for years, and now that it has...what will change? Where will things go from here??? A very solid book, writing is good from Straczynski, no surprise, and the art from Romita Jr. is also quite good, they make a very strong team. Off to a good start for this series.

  27. 5 out of 5

    André Santana

    “The usual hero adventure begins with someone from whom something has been taken, or who feels there is something lacking in the normal experience available or permitted to the members of society. The person then takes off on a series of adventures beyond the ordinary, either to recover what has been lost or to discover some life-giving elixir. It’s usually a cycle, a coming, and a returning.” – Excerpt from The Hero With a Thousand Faces, by Joseph Campbell – comparative mythologist. Life happens “The usual hero adventure begins with someone from whom something has been taken, or who feels there is something lacking in the normal experience available or permitted to the members of society. The person then takes off on a series of adventures beyond the ordinary, either to recover what has been lost or to discover some life-giving elixir. It’s usually a cycle, a coming, and a returning.” – Excerpt from The Hero With a Thousand Faces, by Joseph Campbell – comparative mythologist. Life happens in cycles. And though our lives are not exactly filled with extraordinary adventures due to our routine to accomplish survival, new experiences are part of the process of self-discovery; it’s part of our nature. Not only we welcome such experiences but yearn for them. And therein lies the origin of imagination – to exercise fantasy and find out what we are capable of doing, and the material we’re made of. The craving to venture into new territories and the outcome of learning something new about ourselves: either a new limit or something we never thought capable of doing it. We go through cycles and phases, defined by specific rites of passage – though not exactly named as such – to determine a mark in our lives; celebrating our birthday, for instance, is one of them. The same can be applied to superhero comic book characters. Though they represent modern mythology as we know today through movies, series, books; call it industrialized entertainment, popular culture, “geek realm”, “nerdy thing”, “childish habit” – their presence and influence in our culture are undeniable. Just like the gods and their tales of old from thousands of years ago, we do the same to pay homage to their moral compass carrying their images and symbols in our t-shirts, wallets, drinking glasses, tennis shoes, lunchboxes. They are part of our collective consciousness; some of them even surpass our lifetimes: there’s no better proof now than Action Comics #1000 – the comic book that published the very first Superman story and now celebrates his 80th anniversary. Eighty years. Superman and all the others which came after will probably outlive us – not only by the time of existence but by the longevity of publication. And right there lies a problem if viewed as such: North-American superhero comic book characters, given their cultural importance as icons and profit value, are destined to outlive us – old and new comic book readers alike. The stories of their lives will be told and adapted to new generations. Simply put: they can’t die. And even if they do, they’ll eventually return, as Superman and others did. For some, that represents fatigue and a decisive factor to anyone who decides to start a (superhero) comic book collection: where does it begin? Will it end? The end came to the myths of old and all the characters from the Bible. They won’t have sequels. Comic book-wise, the same can be applied to Japanese comics – Manga – such as Akira and Lone Wolf & Cub, or other limited series, such as the Vertigo publishing line from DC Comics with titles like Sandman, Preacher, and Fables presenting a beginning, a middle and an end, with characters story arcs, following the cycle principle postulated by Joseph Campbell. But the current publishing companies which own the rights of superheroes characters must search profits, like any other industry. Hence the necessity to renumber and restart long published titles to attract new readers. Sometimes more than once in a while. Ends and beginnings. Cycles. Synonyms that can also be applied to our lifespans and the events that mark rites of passage. After more than a decade of dark and brooding stories, the Marvel Comics publishing company was in dire need of reshaping itself for a new century. If the Ultimate Line of comics provided new readers with a brand-new updated and younger version of Peter Parker for a new millennium, then there was no need at all for the original and already existent version to remain young. After nearly forty years (back then) of continuous publishing chronology, it was time for the original Peter Parker to grow old and evolve – not to change according to current comic book trends of his time like the nineties, but to evolve for himself, as a human character – then, as a superhero. Under new editorial management since the year 2000, the then Editor-in-Chief of Marvel Comics Joe Quesada drafts experienced TV writer Joseph Michael Straczynski – a professional writer with years of experience in journalism, cartoons (Ghostbusters, He-Man), TV (Babylon 5, Sense 8), and cinema (Thor, Ninja Assassin, The Changeling), also skilled in sociology, psychology, philosophy, and literature. In comics, he gained accolade through his published work at Top Cow/Image with the incredible limited series Rising Stars and Midnight Nation. Furthermore at Marvel with Strange, The Fantastic Four, Bullet Points, Supreme Power, and the revival of Thor. At DC, with The Brave and The Bold, Superman: Earth One and Before Watchmen. More than many of his peers, Straczynski understands and applies the concept that it is the character’s essence that drives the plot forward, and not the characters being submissive to the factors in the plot. Once he understands their personalities, he just lets them speak and behave according to their own nature. It was through him that the Spider-Totem (as first conceptualized in Kraven’s Last Hunt) and Peter Parker’s maturity were emphasized with a whole new approach. His run started in July 2001 – in issue #30 of the second volume of The Amazing Spider-Man title; until then, the first renumbering of the series. Along for the ride, veteran, and legendary Spider-Man artist John Romita Jr. with the concise inking from Scott Hanna – both already in the title before Straczynski’s arrival. This professional duo couldn’t be more suited for the assignment: JRJr is at the peak of his game by evolving his own style again, from one issue (previous to JMS’ arrival) to another. To Spider-Man, he’s the perfect artist who can blend his Father’s style, with Ditko and even Kirby’s – the perfect balance between style and substance, making him one of the best visual storytellers in the industry. Either by providing incredible cinematic sequences or engaging dramatic moments in which only a simple conversation takes place, his style – supported by precise fine lines of Hanna – depict great moments where each character’s expression feels real; their body language and movement are believable and able to convey emotion even without words. On top of it all, there’s the great coloring provided by Dan Kemp – his usage of the blue palette for most of the scenes refines the visual of the comic. The colors make more sense because the reader immediately knows whether it’s day or night; where the light sources in closed environments come from and how strong they are; how Spidey’s web shines and the lenses on his mask are anything but blank white, reflecting the light from his surroundings. The book becomes more vivid, making a pleasant comic to even look at its interior art. Richard Starkings also remained for the lettering duties. With all those elements in place, it’s worth recognizing that, even with the same artists, the book’s visual style has been redesigned; it became a better visual reading experience, and that shows how the work of an editor behind the assembling and production of a comic book: replacing Marvel veteran Ralph Macchio (redirected to coordinate the Ultimate Line), came DC/Vertigo editor Axel Alonso, who then later replaced Quesada as E-i-C; his work on the ASM title began on issue #27, April 2001. This run is not a new beginning. It is a continuation, an evolution (not a change) from everything that came before. But only for Peter Parker as Spider-Man. For an interview conceded to the Wizard Magazine at the time of the title’s first issue under his pen, Straczynski (or “JMS”) mentioned his approach to the character: “You learn in television that if the staff (writers) doesn’t know what to do with the main character, they build up the surrounding characters to make a difference. The characters around Spidey had grown so overpowering, Spider-Man was really a supporting character within his own book.” – J. Michael Straczynski. When JMS took over Spider-Man’s life, he focused only on the people who really mattered to Peter Parker at this stage of his life: (Aunt) May Parker and Mary Jane Watson. Gone were the days where May used to be written as a very naive old woman worried about his precious nephew; her pattern speech became more firm and realistic; she evolved into a woman with a broader awareness (Romita Jr. made sure we capture that even without words). As for Mary Jane, the writer took into consideration the stories that preceded his, making good use of MJ’s departure – a plotline conceived during Howard Mackie’s tenure in the book. JMS analyzed what that meant for Peter and started from there, which enabled him to start his run on the book in a manner never seen until then. He is stripped down from his entire supporting cast. No search for a new apartment, or the need to find a roommate. No desperate need to sell pictures for the Daily Bugle. No stress in fighting the villain of the week that is somehow strung to someone else in Peter’s life. Instead of showing all of that, Spider-Man is downright pissed off. Big Time. Lashing down his frustration inside an abandoned building scheduled to be demolished; just angry due to MJ’s absence. TRANSFORMATIONS, LITERAL & OTHERWISE: Ultimately, it’s all about the character. He’s no longer a shy, insecure young adult who will only unleash his demons and frustrations whenever he’s under the Spider-mask. Both personas are aligned with one another. He got older; not old. Just more mature than he has ever been before. Just like us, in the same state of mind, the priorities drastically change. His glass is empty. His concerns are different. A new purpose is required and a cycle begins anew, just like real-life outside comic books. Welcome to your adulthood, Peter. With adulthood, comes the process of self-awareness. As we begin to understand more of the world that surrounds us, more questions might emerge regarding our own nature – depending on how deep we decide to dig up and ask simple – but important – questions about it. Hence the importance of Comparative Mythology and its purpose: self-discovery. Such concepts and questions presented insofar are also used by JMS and JRJr to redefine Spider-Man’s nature and even our own concept from him as a character. His origin is carved and ranks high in the hall of greatest superhero origins; we know the history of his creation as a character. But once looked from within his own realm of fiction – the Marvel Comics Universe -, could there be more to it? Peter Parker can replicate the powers of a Spider, but why him? Why the Spider? Was radioactivity the catalysis? READ FULL REVIEW AT: https://www.spidermancrawlspace.com/2...

  28. 5 out of 5

    orton41290

    Coming Home finally ditches the teenage Spider-Man for a young adult version. It's basically the same, but with less angst and acne. 20-something Spider-Man meets a strange man named Ezekiel who seems to have similar powers as him and comes with a warning, Morlun is coming for Peter and his only salvation is a bunker Ezekiel created. He wants Peter to hide from Morlun until he's given up and moved on, but if Morlun touches Peter and gets a feel for him, he will not relent until Peter is dead. Th Coming Home finally ditches the teenage Spider-Man for a young adult version. It's basically the same, but with less angst and acne. 20-something Spider-Man meets a strange man named Ezekiel who seems to have similar powers as him and comes with a warning, Morlun is coming for Peter and his only salvation is a bunker Ezekiel created. He wants Peter to hide from Morlun until he's given up and moved on, but if Morlun touches Peter and gets a feel for him, he will not relent until Peter is dead. The entire story reeks of missing details. I don't know if we are supposed to know stuff about Ezekiel and Morlun, because we get very little information of either of them. Why does Ezekiel care about Peter? Who/what is Morlun? And the ending only raised more questions. The story is unique, but it plays out way too fast on a paper-thin plot. This is six issues worth of content, but it feels so shallow and unrealized. I found Morlun to be a boring villain and was desperately hoping that they would ditch him and explore Ezekiel some more, because at least that thread had some actual plot potential. The artwork is unimpressive and Spider-Man spends too much time talking too himself instead of being fucking Spider-Man. It was a fair Spider-Man entry that gets points for originality, but being original isn't the same as being good.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Davey

    I honestly don't get what so many readers see in this. JMS's first Spider-Man story continues to enjoy a great deal of goodwill years after its release despite not excelling in any area. JMS substitutes sentimentality and an undeserved sense of nostalgia for an engaging story, desperately tugging at the readers heartstrings in the hope that they will overlook his tale's shortcomings. "Walking along the corridors of his former highschool, Peter smiled to himself and thought about how some things I honestly don't get what so many readers see in this. JMS's first Spider-Man story continues to enjoy a great deal of goodwill years after its release despite not excelling in any area. JMS substitutes sentimentality and an undeserved sense of nostalgia for an engaging story, desperately tugging at the readers heartstrings in the hope that they will overlook his tale's shortcomings. "Walking along the corridors of his former highschool, Peter smiled to himself and thought about how some things never really changed..." This is just off the top of my head, but it should give you an idea of what the author is going for here. All this would be tolerable if current Spider-Man scribe Dan Slott hadn't come along a few years ago and shown that there are still many exciting places left to take Peter Parker and his readership. Slott easily packs more plot, ideas and witty banter into one issue than JMS did into six, and his comic-book science is infinitely more creative, fun and plausible. Check out Spider-Verse to see Morlun and the Inheritors done right.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Adam Bain

    This was freakin great! I would have given it it 5 stars but it wasn't quite there. Just. Okay I have to get a couple of secrets of my chest. Something that can usually get you a lot of shit if it's revealed in certain circles...I never use to like Spider-Man as a character. I know I know, I'm an ignorant twat. I can admit that now. And secondly...I really enjoy John Romita Jr's art...but please refrain from throwing rocks until I'm done! I admit that at first I hated it with a passion when I star This was freakin great! I would have given it it 5 stars but it wasn't quite there. Just. Okay I have to get a couple of secrets of my chest. Something that can usually get you a lot of shit if it's revealed in certain circles...I never use to like Spider-Man as a character. I know I know, I'm an ignorant twat. I can admit that now. And secondly...I really enjoy John Romita Jr's art...but please refrain from throwing rocks until I'm done! I admit that at first I hated it with a passion when I started Superman: Men of Tomorrow, but by the time I'd finished the book I was loving it. And this is no exception. I'd even say that his art suits Spider-Man even more so than Supes. The story is great and really shows you Peter having to overcome a brutal, unrelenting enemy. There were also some cool revelations that put a twist on his origins that I enjoyed. By then end I was itching for more. So I may need to purchase the omnibus version of this run. Wait, correct that...I NEED to purchase the omnibus.

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