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Out of the Deep I Cry

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On April 1, 1930, Jonathan Ketchem's wife Jane walked from her house to the police department to ask for help in finding her husband. The men, worn out from a night of chasing bootleggers, did what they could. But no one ever saw Jonathan Ketchem again... Now decades later, someone else is missing in Miller's Kill, NY. This time it's the physician of the clinic that bears t On April 1, 1930, Jonathan Ketchem's wife Jane walked from her house to the police department to ask for help in finding her husband. The men, worn out from a night of chasing bootleggers, did what they could. But no one ever saw Jonathan Ketchem again... Now decades later, someone else is missing in Miller's Kill, NY. This time it's the physician of the clinic that bears the Ketchem name. Suspicion falls on a volatile single mother with a grudge against the doctor, but Reverend Clare Fergusson isn't convinced. As Clare and Russ investigate, they discover that the doctor's disappearance is linked to a bloody trail going all the way back to the hardscrabble Prohibition era. As they draw ever closer to the truth, their attraction for each other grows increasingly more difficult to resist. And their search threatens to uncover secrets that snake from one generation to the next--and to someone who's ready to kill. Julia Spencer-Fleming has created the most intriguing entry yet in her Anthony, Agatha and Macavity Award-winning detective series, which "brings new airs and graces to the traditional small-town mystery" (New York Times Book Review). Out of the Deep I Cry is a 2005 Edgar Award Nominee for Best Novel.


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On April 1, 1930, Jonathan Ketchem's wife Jane walked from her house to the police department to ask for help in finding her husband. The men, worn out from a night of chasing bootleggers, did what they could. But no one ever saw Jonathan Ketchem again... Now decades later, someone else is missing in Miller's Kill, NY. This time it's the physician of the clinic that bears t On April 1, 1930, Jonathan Ketchem's wife Jane walked from her house to the police department to ask for help in finding her husband. The men, worn out from a night of chasing bootleggers, did what they could. But no one ever saw Jonathan Ketchem again... Now decades later, someone else is missing in Miller's Kill, NY. This time it's the physician of the clinic that bears the Ketchem name. Suspicion falls on a volatile single mother with a grudge against the doctor, but Reverend Clare Fergusson isn't convinced. As Clare and Russ investigate, they discover that the doctor's disappearance is linked to a bloody trail going all the way back to the hardscrabble Prohibition era. As they draw ever closer to the truth, their attraction for each other grows increasingly more difficult to resist. And their search threatens to uncover secrets that snake from one generation to the next--and to someone who's ready to kill. Julia Spencer-Fleming has created the most intriguing entry yet in her Anthony, Agatha and Macavity Award-winning detective series, which "brings new airs and graces to the traditional small-town mystery" (New York Times Book Review). Out of the Deep I Cry is a 2005 Edgar Award Nominee for Best Novel.

30 review for Out of the Deep I Cry

  1. 5 out of 5

    Hallie

    4.5, maybe? The number of murders, life-threatening situations into which Clare &/or Russ fall, and general wrong-doing continues, in all honesty, fairly ridiculous, but I loved the way the history of Miller's Kill and its families was incorporated into this book. None of the books in the series I've read so far is exactly cozy, despite the small-town setting, but this is even bleaker than the other two. I think the mystery was better too, or at least it seemed as if once I'd got the reveal, I s 4.5, maybe? The number of murders, life-threatening situations into which Clare &/or Russ fall, and general wrong-doing continues, in all honesty, fairly ridiculous, but I loved the way the history of Miller's Kill and its families was incorporated into this book. None of the books in the series I've read so far is exactly cozy, despite the small-town setting, but this is even bleaker than the other two. I think the mystery was better too, or at least it seemed as if once I'd got the reveal, I saw how we'd been given all the necessary clues. Going to go into spoilers here, to talk a bit about Clare & Russ, but on a general note, I still love them so heart-rendingly much. SO MUCH. (view spoiler)[ I know I'm looking for excuses to make Russ's marriage break-up-able, but I'm extremely unimpressed with everything said about it. Blinding herself to the fact that his life is constantly at risk just so she doesn't have to worry, AKA not giving a damn - that's not marriage, though I'm not sure what it is. Note his mother deals with reality and worries, because she does actually love him. Also, his owing his life to Linda's telling him it's her or the booze and going to her sister's? Ehn. 99% of the time, that's not going to cut it with an alcoholic, and it's much, much easier than telling him and then sticking around to deal with the denials, and the anger and the denials, and the blame... I did have a bit of a hard time with her -- gasp! -- appearance in the book (finally!), as so much has been said about how small and gossipy Miller's Kill is, and the chances that one of her friends there hasn't mentioned something about Clare to her seemed small to me. Finally, the ending was nearly perfect. Only thing that put me off slightly was Clare's saying "You're a man in love with his wife." It seemed only to set up for his somewhat humorous rejoinder, but it's misleading and off the point, which is that he HAS a wife. Still small quibbles, friends, small quibbles. (hide spoiler)]

  2. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    Five stars for the ending, which took my heart out and RIPPED IT TO PIECES. (view spoiler)[ "There's something in me that recognized you. Right from the start. The parts of me that always felt alone, the parts of me that I always kept hidden away, out of sight--I could see that you had them, too." He smiled a little. "Sorry, I'm not saying this very smoothly." She stepped closer. "I never asked you to be smooth. Just to be yourself." He had to close his eyes for a moment, to get himself under contro Five stars for the ending, which took my heart out and RIPPED IT TO PIECES. (view spoiler)[ "There's something in me that recognized you. Right from the start. The parts of me that always felt alone, the parts of me that I always kept hidden away, out of sight--I could see that you had them, too." He smiled a little. "Sorry, I'm not saying this very smoothly." She stepped closer. "I never asked you to be smooth. Just to be yourself." He had to close his eyes for a moment, to get himself under control. That's just it. I know I can tell you, 'This is who I am.' And your answer will always be--" "Yes." "Yes." "I didn't want to fall in love with you," she said. He tightened his grip on her hand. "I'm sorry." Her voice was on the edge of crying. "Oh, love." He let his cane clatter to the stone floor and pulled her to him. "Why?" She tipped her head back to meet his eyes. "Because we're going to break our hearts." He wanted to reassure her, but what could he said? She was right. So he rocked her back and forth and they clung to each other, while the candles burned down and the sad-faced angels held out their glass promises. For he doth not afflict willingly, not grieve the children of men. (hide spoiler)] WHAT IS WRONG WITH YOU, BOOK? WHY ARE YOU DOING THIS TO ME?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Wanda

    I am really enjoying this series despite the fact that I’m having to use interlibrary loan to get a hold of this one and the next volume. Once I’ve read that one, they’re all available here locally and I can binge read them if I decide to. I love the use of history here--linking the present to the past in meaningful ways. As a genealogist, I’ve found that a family’s past can sometimes explain current problems. At least in my own family, it has. We can’t easily escape the ties of past events unles I am really enjoying this series despite the fact that I’m having to use interlibrary loan to get a hold of this one and the next volume. Once I’ve read that one, they’re all available here locally and I can binge read them if I decide to. I love the use of history here--linking the present to the past in meaningful ways. As a genealogist, I’ve found that a family’s past can sometimes explain current problems. At least in my own family, it has. We can’t easily escape the ties of past events unless we understand what’s going on and make a conscious decision to change things. The other aspect that really appeals to me is the relationship between Claire and Russ. They are trying so hard to keep it at friendship. Both are honourable people and their reputations are important to them, but it’s becoming obvious in this volume that there is a certain amount of gossip going on regarding the exact nature of their bond. It doesn’t help that fate keeps putting them in positions where they are bound to be tempted. It’s agonizing slow-motion, keeping the tension tight and I’m finding that irresistible!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Abby

    She's done it again! Another stellar mystery from Julia Spencer-Fleming. This one I *almost* had figured out, but she got me in the end. What I'm struggling to understand is how the relationship of the main characters in JSF's books are doing all the things that in a more "traditional" romance would be my DO NOT CROSS line and would usually lead me to the "DO NOT BUY" category. Having characters engage in an affair (of the heart or physically) which cases one or both characters to cheat on their She's done it again! Another stellar mystery from Julia Spencer-Fleming. This one I *almost* had figured out, but she got me in the end. What I'm struggling to understand is how the relationship of the main characters in JSF's books are doing all the things that in a more "traditional" romance would be my DO NOT CROSS line and would usually lead me to the "DO NOT BUY" category. Having characters engage in an affair (of the heart or physically) which cases one or both characters to cheat on their long-term partner is a BIG problem for me. So it's freaking me out why I love Clare and Russ so very damn much. And what it is about JSF's writing that is making me love these two so much that I'm willing to overlook what has previously been a big honkin' line in the sand. I don't have it figured out by a long shot, but I love it, I'm enjoying thinking about it and I can't wait to read more about Miller's Kill and Clare and Russ.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sheila

    I thought this was the best in the series so far. I have been wondering when we would finally get to meet Linda and of course was hoping that I would instantly hate her, but I didn't. Lots of tension between Clair and Russ. They are definitely playing with fire in more than one sense. I loved the historical aspect of this story. In todays world we take for granted our access to health care and medicines so it was really interesting to see how people had to deal with disease back in the "good old I thought this was the best in the series so far. I have been wondering when we would finally get to meet Linda and of course was hoping that I would instantly hate her, but I didn't. Lots of tension between Clair and Russ. They are definitely playing with fire in more than one sense. I loved the historical aspect of this story. In todays world we take for granted our access to health care and medicines so it was really interesting to see how people had to deal with disease back in the "good old days". This story hit home for me with the side story of Jonathon's disappearance. I have the same history in my own family. My maternal grandfather just disappeared as well. This would have been in the 1930's. When my mom was 2 she and her parents went to town and were to meet back at the car at a certain time that afternoon. He never showed and was never heard from again. (view spoiler)[Gosh I hope MY grandmother didn't whack his with a frying pan!! (hide spoiler)] I gave this one a big ★★★★★!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Karma♥Bites ^.~

    RE-READ (audio) 29 Jan 2020 (★★★★) Format of OUT OF THE DEEP I CRY, #3 of FVA series, differs from previous books in that investigation into disappearance of free clinic doctor is interwoven w/ events from 1920-30s (via flash-back storytelling). Rating primarily for twists & turns in both storylines, b/c I’m definitely *not* feeling the love (yes, pun intended). Will not be happy camper if rom subplot remains on current trajectory & veers into verboten territory :/ RE-READ (audio) 29 Jan 2020 (★★★★) Format of OUT OF THE DEEP I CRY, #3 of FVA series, differs from previous books in that investigation into disappearance of free clinic doctor is interwoven w/ events from 1920-30s (via flash-back storytelling). Rating primarily for twists & turns in both storylines, b/c I’m definitely *not* feeling the love (yes, pun intended). Will not be happy camper if rom subplot remains on current trajectory & veers into verboten territory :/

  7. 5 out of 5

    Karen Syed

    [Book: OUT OF THE DEEP I CRY], and cry I did. I started this book over a month ago after getting an autographed copy (and a hug) from Julia at the South Carolina Book Festival. I was ill at the time and became even more ill in the weeks that followed. I kept plugging along, wanting to read more and more, but alas, my cardiac specialist said "Into the hospital with you!" And in I went. Well, you'd think lying in a hospital bed would give me plenty of time to read. Too bad I could not stay awake. [Book: OUT OF THE DEEP I CRY], and cry I did. I started this book over a month ago after getting an autographed copy (and a hug) from Julia at the South Carolina Book Festival. I was ill at the time and became even more ill in the weeks that followed. I kept plugging along, wanting to read more and more, but alas, my cardiac specialist said "Into the hospital with you!" And in I went. Well, you'd think lying in a hospital bed would give me plenty of time to read. Too bad I could not stay awake. So I huddled in my fashionable hospital gown, waiting to have heart surgery, and unable to read the last six pages of the dang book that was calling to me. So today, one week after receiving my defibrillator and pacemaker, it gives me great pleasure to announce, "I FINISHED THE BOOK!" Julia Spencer-Fleming has a great talent for pulling together characters and setting to the point of them almost being one. Clare and Russ are such a part of their environment that I don't think one could survive without the other, much like Clare and Russ in their personal lives. Whodunit? Where is the body? Whose body is that? Would a single mom kill to protect her beliefs and her children? Bootleggers, long-buried secrets rearing their ugly heads, and a roof about to collapse-all great materials for mayhem. The clever twists of this book had me tugging on those pages, not being able to read fast enough to get the answers I craved from the story. The flashback areas of this story are remarkably well written and give the story a flavor that would be a delight for any mystery reader. This story, is giving me fits on whether I like it or In the Bleak Midwinter better. Hats off to Julia Spencer-Fleming for a book worth savoring and sharing (the word, not the book - you have to buy your own copy-I know Julia has kids to feed.)

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cara

    This one just finished this series off for me. Clare continues to get overly involved in everything that doesn't have to do with her actual job (frankly, it's a wonder that she has time to actually conduct services and attend to her other clerical duties). Russ continues to let her push her way into stuff that doesn't concern her. The mystery was okay--the story told in flashbacks was moving and the best part. But the Clare/Russ developments finished this for me. I don't consider myself a rigid m This one just finished this series off for me. Clare continues to get overly involved in everything that doesn't have to do with her actual job (frankly, it's a wonder that she has time to actually conduct services and attend to her other clerical duties). Russ continues to let her push her way into stuff that doesn't concern her. The mystery was okay--the story told in flashbacks was moving and the best part. But the Clare/Russ developments finished this for me. I don't consider myself a rigid moralist, but I cannot find a justification for adultery in a world where divorce is available. Russ and Clare know that they are in love with each other, they even confess it, and they excuse themselves and each other. Had Clare taken any steps to address her feelings for Ross (by, for example, seeking counseling from someone in the diocese), I might have felt some sympathy for her situation. But for most of the novel, she just keeps telling herself that it's all fine. And when she realizes towards the end that this is becoming dangerous, she sets a boundary that she then almost immediately surrenders. It's not that I expect more from a cleric than I do from a layperson; I expect more from the supposed hero and heroine of the book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jacob Proffitt

    The time hopping in this one took some getting used to. I found it off-putting at first, mainly because the main character involved was kind of depressing—with good cause as she stood at the center of the story and it's a mystery and this is Julia Spencer-Fleming we're talking about here, so it's gonna be emotionally charged. And bleak. To start. Indeed, gaining sympathy for Jane Ketchum (despite her own evaluation of herself) highlights the author's true genius for getting into her characters an The time hopping in this one took some getting used to. I found it off-putting at first, mainly because the main character involved was kind of depressing—with good cause as she stood at the center of the story and it's a mystery and this is Julia Spencer-Fleming we're talking about here, so it's gonna be emotionally charged. And bleak. To start. Indeed, gaining sympathy for Jane Ketchum (despite her own evaluation of herself) highlights the author's true genius for getting into her characters and connecting readers to them—almost a single-handed refutation of Derrida's alien other. This book, and where Clare and Russ were at the end, cemented my determination to read the rest of the series. I'm very glad that Melissa has already done all the hard work of gathering them in for consumption...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

    This is the third of Julia Spencer-Fleming's novels that I have read, and she is bidding to become a new favorite author. In this particular outing, protagonists Rev. Claire Fergusson and police chief Russ Van Alstyne become entangled in a parallel investigation -- two missing men, one who disappeared in the 1930s and one who disappears in the here-and-now. All of the action starts because the church roof is leaking, and one of the vestry members is willing to surrender her family trust to have This is the third of Julia Spencer-Fleming's novels that I have read, and she is bidding to become a new favorite author. In this particular outing, protagonists Rev. Claire Fergusson and police chief Russ Van Alstyne become entangled in a parallel investigation -- two missing men, one who disappeared in the 1930s and one who disappears in the here-and-now. All of the action starts because the church roof is leaking, and one of the vestry members is willing to surrender her family trust to have it repaired -- a trust established by a widowed mother after the Depression, and that currently funds the town's free clinic. When the clinic doctor goes missing after being threatened in his office by an anti-vaccine mother, the story really gets rolling. The tension created between the married Van Alstyne and Fergusson idue to their mutual attraction is a large part of the plot; they know that things will not work out for many reasons, and thus they are the best of friends but nothing more. The two characters are an outstanding investigative team. The book touches on bootlegging in upstate New York, as well as rumrunning from Canada during Prohibition, and describes some violent crimes and disease symptoms in a way that may disturb sensitive readers.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ivonne Rovira

    Dr. Allen Rouse, the irascible director of the free clinic in the the town of Millers Kill in Upstate New York vanishes one night. The disappearance echoes another one that occurred in 1930 when another man, Jonathan Ketcham, drove out into the night, never to be seen again. Reverend Clare Fergusson, Army helicopter pilot turned Episcopal priest, and Sheriff Russ Van Alstyne join forces again to determine what happened to both men and to wonder whether the two disappearances might be linked desp Dr. Allen Rouse, the irascible director of the free clinic in the the town of Millers Kill in Upstate New York vanishes one night. The disappearance echoes another one that occurred in 1930 when another man, Jonathan Ketcham, drove out into the night, never to be seen again. Reverend Clare Fergusson, Army helicopter pilot turned Episcopal priest, and Sheriff Russ Van Alstyne join forces again to determine what happened to both men and to wonder whether the two disappearances might be linked despite the 70 years between them. Both of the men had a connection to Jonathan’s wife, Jane Ketcham, who built the free clinic through cunning, hard work, and a will of steel and named it after her late husband. Now 30 years after the formidable Mrs. Ketcham’s death, Dr. Rouse goes missing, too. Author Julia Spencer-Fleming seamlessly weaves in lessons on the dangers of diphtheria in the early 20th century and on the current anti-vaccination crusades, all while crafting two compelling mysteries. Those who are new to the series can begin with this one without feeling lost, but longtime fans will enjoy seeing how the relationship between the principled Clare and the married Russ develops.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    The Clare Fergusson/Russ Van Alstyne series continues to thrill me with its intriguing plots and fascinating characters. Julia Spencer-Fleming never fails to ensconce the reader into the world of Millers Kill through her masterful description and perfectly timed action sequences. This addition to the series must reach back to the 1920s and prohibition to unravel the mystery of a missing doctor. It seems that there was another missing man, gone missing in 1930, who plays a prominent role in the s The Clare Fergusson/Russ Van Alstyne series continues to thrill me with its intriguing plots and fascinating characters. Julia Spencer-Fleming never fails to ensconce the reader into the world of Millers Kill through her masterful description and perfectly timed action sequences. This addition to the series must reach back to the 1920s and prohibition to unravel the mystery of a missing doctor. It seems that there was another missing man, gone missing in 1930, who plays a prominent role in the subsequent events. Clare, of course, finds herself smack dab in the middle of its unraveling. She also finds herself inching closer to a confrontation between her mind and heart where Chief Alstyne is concerned. The issue of vaccinations is included in this disappearance story, too. Beginning with the vaccine for diphtheria in the 1920s and now the current vaccinations advised for children, education concerning these inoculations and some parents' distrust of them figure into the story line in a most interesting way. With Russ breaking his leg and Clare picking up the slack, it is a tale of people confronting their demons and their feelings.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    The Clare Fergusson/Russ Van Alstyne series,is yet another I promised myself I'd read when I retired. I had read the first two,liked the light mysteries and adored the angst exhibited by the two main characters. She, a former army chopper pilot, now an Episcopal priest and he, a married small-town chief of police steam up the pages in the cold winters in Millers Kill, NY. In parallel stories,Van Alstyne and Fergusson seek missing persons, Jonathan Ketchem, a cold case from the 30's, the other the The Clare Fergusson/Russ Van Alstyne series,is yet another I promised myself I'd read when I retired. I had read the first two,liked the light mysteries and adored the angst exhibited by the two main characters. She, a former army chopper pilot, now an Episcopal priest and he, a married small-town chief of police steam up the pages in the cold winters in Millers Kill, NY. In parallel stories,Van Alstyne and Fergusson seek missing persons, Jonathan Ketchem, a cold case from the 30's, the other the present day disappearance of a clinic physician, Dr. Allan Rouse. One link; Ketchem money once supported the clinic and is now being diverted to a roof project on Clare's church. There are others but none more interesting than the issue of vaccination of children which plays a role in both stories. Easy to read, I'm looking forward to number four in this series.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Janet C-B

    This is a murder mystery told in 2 time frames, current and past (1920's-1930's). The novel is #3 in a series featuring Claire, a local reverend, and Russ, the local police chief in a small town in the Adirondacks. I appreciated that the chapters were simply titled, "Then," and "Now." While I was drawn in to the current storyline, I found the past a bit more tedious. It is a good murder mystery that seemed to end abruptly on the developing relationship between Clare and Russ. I enjoyed the book, This is a murder mystery told in 2 time frames, current and past (1920's-1930's). The novel is #3 in a series featuring Claire, a local reverend, and Russ, the local police chief in a small town in the Adirondacks. I appreciated that the chapters were simply titled, "Then," and "Now." While I was drawn in to the current storyline, I found the past a bit more tedious. It is a good murder mystery that seemed to end abruptly on the developing relationship between Clare and Russ. I enjoyed the book, but not as much as the author's most recent book in the series. This might be related to the author's progressing writing skills. I do have a library hold on the first book in the series, and I will look forward to the author's next book in the series. I rate this book 3 stars.m

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cathryn Conroy

    I am not particularly a fan of mysteries/detective stories, but this nine-book series by Julia Spencer-Fleming has definitely piqued my interest much like those of Louise Penny. The premise of all the books is simple but effective: the unusual collaboration of a small town's chief of police and the local Episcopal priest to solve crimes. Adding to the fun is the definite but off-limits sexual attraction between the happily married Chief Russ Van Alstyne and the Rev. Clare Fergusson, who is young I am not particularly a fan of mysteries/detective stories, but this nine-book series by Julia Spencer-Fleming has definitely piqued my interest much like those of Louise Penny. The premise of all the books is simple but effective: the unusual collaboration of a small town's chief of police and the local Episcopal priest to solve crimes. Adding to the fun is the definite but off-limits sexual attraction between the happily married Chief Russ Van Alstyne and the Rev. Clare Fergusson, who is young, single, smart, and pretty. In this third volume, the story flips between "then" and "now" (where we are in time is clearly marked in each chapter heading) with both plotlines focused on a missing person from Millers Kill, New York. Were these homicides, suicides, or a chance to escape and create a brand-new life under a brand-new name? Is there a nefarious connection between the two cases, which take place decades apart? While the second book in the series tackles the ugly issue of hate crimes against gays, this third book explores the controversial notion that children's vaccines cause autism. If you're reading the books in order (and you really should), this one delves much deeper into Russ's background and psyche than the first two did, which focused more on Clare. And perhaps this is the greatest strength of the series: The characters are strong and so well-developed that they feel real. I want to keep reading because I want to spend time with Clare and Russ. Also, there are just enough unexpected twists and turns to keep me riveted to the last page. This is not great literature, but it is a great escape. Read it for fun, and see how quickly you can solve both missing person cases.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mimi Smith

    4 stars Not really a review here. Just had to say Linda FINALLY appeared here. I was starting to suspect she was a ghost. Or a goblin. Love the mysteries, Russ, Clare (even though she has really reckless, dare I say stupid, moments). Am really curious about the personal dilemmas.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

    4.5 stars - I am enjoying my re-read of this series more than I expected going in. This book was really good, and it was tough at times. We have misery in the present and almost a century before, as the book flashes back to events in the lives of some of Millers Kill's residents and their families. I also bring to my reading this time the knowledge of events of later in the series, which has definitely colored my perceptions of some of the events in the book. I should say a word about religion, e 4.5 stars - I am enjoying my re-read of this series more than I expected going in. This book was really good, and it was tough at times. We have misery in the present and almost a century before, as the book flashes back to events in the lives of some of Millers Kill's residents and their families. I also bring to my reading this time the knowledge of events of later in the series, which has definitely colored my perceptions of some of the events in the book. I should say a word about religion, especially since I know that not everybody who follows me here has the same experience with it. The first time I read these it was as an Anglican/Episcopalian and so the world of the church was a familiar one that I was constantly surrounded by in real life. But in 2020, I am not the same person. I don't know where to find my spiritual home, because so many potential homes seem to ask me to believe things that my experience of the world doesn't reflect (and other potential homes are straight-up hostile to people like me). So… what I would say about this series is: they feature an Episcopal priest and her parish and her work there often show up. But… it doesn't feel like the series is a vehicle intended to push that faith. That said, we occasionally read Rev. Clare preaching and other quotes from prayers. So, if your life experiences make mentions of churches and faith unhealthy for you, you should probably give the series a pass. As for me, while it has sparked some "I miss the church" feelings for me, that feels more specific to my personal history than the book's content. I digress. Getting back to the book itself, this one felt heavy. And it also felt way too timely, given that it's more than a decade old. We had the vaccination/autism allegations, there are missing persons, there is tragedy. But… there is also a case, and it is solved. All may not be right in the world, but at least something gets resolved.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mike Finn

    "Out Of The Deep I Cry" links Clare, our modern-day ex-army helicopter pilot turned Episcopalian Priest and Russ our local boy returned to be sheriff after a little too long in the army, more closely to the past of the small town of Miller's Kill, New York. As with the previous books, "Out Of The Deep I Cry" manages to link the investigation of a crime to a topical issue, in this case, the inoculation of children. It then goes a step further and links the fates of the current Miller's Kill gener "Out Of The Deep I Cry" links Clare, our modern-day ex-army helicopter pilot turned Episcopalian Priest and Russ our local boy returned to be sheriff after a little too long in the army, more closely to the past of the small town of Miller's Kill, New York. As with the previous books, "Out Of The Deep I Cry" manages to link the investigation of a crime to a topical issue, in this case, the inoculation of children. It then goes a step further and links the fates of the current Miller's Kill generation with the trials faced by their grandparents, when diphtheria was killing children, when inoculation was new and not widely accepted and when rural New York was the main route for smuggling illegal alcohol to New York City. While I enjoyed the cleverness of the mysteries in the plot and how they were resolved, what struck me most was how the actions of previous generations can seem so long ago yet still have impacts and echoes in the daily lives of their descendants. I was impressed that the story of the previous generation was told with the same clarity and authenticity as the modern-day story. Julia Spencer-Fleming managed to weave the two timelines together in ways that were easy to follow and which made both stories stronger. In the process, she set out the dilemmas faced by parents trying to do the best by their children, without being judgemental.pencer There is a lot of grief in this book, some of which has been carried for a long time. I admired the way that grief was respected and understood rather than being exploited. It kept the book human and it kept the emotions high. The relationship between Clare and Russ continues to grow and to cause both of them pleasure and guilt. This too is handled with empathy and without ducking the moral issues involved. It seems to me that this series is getting stronger as it goes along. I'm looking forward to reading the next book. crime

  19. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    A LOT of this really worked well for me—the dual timelines, which can become clunky in cases, really stood out—but it was the climax of the plot and the falling action that really killed me. (view spoiler)[Not only do you put them in this situation where the truth can’t NOT be acknowledged, but then to have Clare respond to it in the most conscientious way—acknowledging it and then trying to hide from it at the same time by cutting off communication—is perfect. And crushing. I can’t even begin to A LOT of this really worked well for me—the dual timelines, which can become clunky in cases, really stood out—but it was the climax of the plot and the falling action that really killed me. (view spoiler)[Not only do you put them in this situation where the truth can’t NOT be acknowledged, but then to have Clare respond to it in the most conscientious way—acknowledging it and then trying to hide from it at the same time by cutting off communication—is perfect. And crushing. I can’t even begin to address that final conversation in the church (hide spoiler)] . Anyhow, you’re all fired for not warning me about this.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    The third in this series with an ending that makes me very glad that I'm late to this game. I can rush to the library and pick up #4 tomorrow instead of waiting until the author gets it published. This time, Reverend Clare's church roof is dire need of repair. After a discussion among the vestry, one offers to pledge her mother's endowment that has been supporting the town clinic. The plot line bounces between (mostly) now and 70 years ago when the woman who set up the endowment lost 4 children t The third in this series with an ending that makes me very glad that I'm late to this game. I can rush to the library and pick up #4 tomorrow instead of waiting until the author gets it published. This time, Reverend Clare's church roof is dire need of repair. After a discussion among the vestry, one offers to pledge her mother's endowment that has been supporting the town clinic. The plot line bounces between (mostly) now and 70 years ago when the woman who set up the endowment lost 4 children to diphtheria. Everything ties up tightly at the end, except one relationship. Oh, baby!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Joanne Duhl

    I am excited to have discovered a new (to me) great author with a cache of books I have yet to read. I loved the characters, the setting (upstate NY not far from where I live), and the issues around which the plot turned - fears about vaccinations - both current and historical - bootlegging, the roles of men and women, both current and historical. Spencer-Fleming is a very good writer and she has created interesting characters in her detective duo - the smart, tough, conflicted feminist minister I am excited to have discovered a new (to me) great author with a cache of books I have yet to read. I loved the characters, the setting (upstate NY not far from where I live), and the issues around which the plot turned - fears about vaccinations - both current and historical - bootlegging, the roles of men and women, both current and historical. Spencer-Fleming is a very good writer and she has created interesting characters in her detective duo - the smart, tough, conflicted feminist minister and the wise, interesting, caring police chief and their strong attraction for one another. As soon as I finished this book I started researching which one of the series to read next. Do I go back to the beginning or continue on from the middle where I started?

  22. 5 out of 5

    Charlene

    I read this book after I completed Books 1, 4, and 2. So now I'm caught up on the story line with the female Episcopal priest and the married male police officer, both of whom are in danger of -- but determined not to -- breaking their respective vows. The story, with its background (and flashbacks to 1920s-30 prohibition and inoculation for diphtheria) having to do with a free clinic, a conflict about inoculations for children, near-violent outcomes, is compelling reading. Oh, and the two men wh I read this book after I completed Books 1, 4, and 2. So now I'm caught up on the story line with the female Episcopal priest and the married male police officer, both of whom are in danger of -- but determined not to -- breaking their respective vows. The story, with its background (and flashbacks to 1920s-30 prohibition and inoculation for diphtheria) having to do with a free clinic, a conflict about inoculations for children, near-violent outcomes, is compelling reading. Oh, and the two men who went missing in those respective times. I did have a problem deciding which crime in 1930 was accurate. Did I read too fast, or was one imagined murder and the other actual murder?

  23. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    Finished this in less than 24 hours! Loved everything about this book (even the unrealistic parts)! I was captivated from the start. It is in the middle of a series, but did not impact the enjoyment. Cannot wait to read more.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    I thought this would be a 4 star book, but by the end I couldn’t put it down! There were so many angles to the story and I really liked how it all came together. And what will happen to Russ and Clare????

  25. 4 out of 5

    Susan in NC

    Read this years ago, books 1,2,3 for sure, very good, but got too dark for me, moved on to other books.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ruth Chatlien

    I'm rereading this much beloved series because I've heard rumors that book 9 may be finally on its way, and I want to have read the others recently when that happens.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    Out of the Deep I Cry Two men disappeared - one in the present day, and one in 1930. As the Rev. Clare Fergusson and Chief of Police Russ Alstyne search for the man who disappeared after meeting a young woman in a cemetery, they unearth connections to the disappearance that occurred eighty years ago. The Ketchem Free Clinic, named after the man who disappeared in 1930, is about to lose some of its funding, and Clare feels responsible. The man's daughter, Lacey Marshall, has decided to break the t Out of the Deep I Cry Two men disappeared - one in the present day, and one in 1930. As the Rev. Clare Fergusson and Chief of Police Russ Alstyne search for the man who disappeared after meeting a young woman in a cemetery, they unearth connections to the disappearance that occurred eighty years ago. The Ketchem Free Clinic, named after the man who disappeared in 1930, is about to lose some of its funding, and Clare feels responsible. The man's daughter, Lacey Marshall, has decided to break the trust that provided funding for the clinic, and Clare's church, which is desperately in need of repairs, will benefit from the money. The Ketchem farm was flooded in 1930 to allow for the creation of a reservoir, and every line of investigation, both past and present, seems to lead to this body of water, or the river that runs through the town of Millers Kill, New York. Clare's suspicions of the fate of Jonathan Ketchem, who disappeared so many years ago, connect to a diphtheria outbreak, and the reason for the visit to the cemetery the night Dr. Rouse disappeared. This is one of Julia Spencer-Fleming's earlier books in this series, when Russ is still married. Their friendship is growing into an undeniable attraction which is difficult to keep secret in a small town like Millers Kill, New York. The two have very different goals and methods of finding the truth, but their paths cross constantly, as Clare cannot resist becoming involved in the investigation. Their ill-fated romance is as intriguing as the murder mystery, which alternates between past and present before we learn the truth. (As published in Suspense Magazine)

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ann

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Out of the Deep I Cry is book three in the Clare Fergusson series. This particular book reveals a family story going back in the early part of the twentieth century that continues to affect the lives of the residents of Millers Kill today. Clare is a former Army helicopter pilot and Army Chaplain and she moved to Millers Kill NY to be the priest of the Millers Kill Episcopal Church in the first book of this enjoyable series where she found cold winters unlike any she had known before, a beautifu Out of the Deep I Cry is book three in the Clare Fergusson series. This particular book reveals a family story going back in the early part of the twentieth century that continues to affect the lives of the residents of Millers Kill today. Clare is a former Army helicopter pilot and Army Chaplain and she moved to Millers Kill NY to be the priest of the Millers Kill Episcopal Church in the first book of this enjoyable series where she found cold winters unlike any she had known before, a beautiful old church building always in need of repair and several situations involving members of her community who need her help or counsel that take her into the midst of police investigations that do not always make her congregation happy. Spencer-Fleming takes her strong, female lead character and puts her in situations straight out of of current events with a small town flavor and ties them together in her stories with great skill, revealing a strong sense of moral outrage and courage while exploring the issues in a balanced manner that makes the reader think long after the last pages of the books are read.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    Nicely done. Interesting theme to the plot. I love reading a series from the beginning, in order, and seeing how the characters and their lives evolve. Waiting anxiously to read the next one. On April 1, 1930, Jonathan Ketchem's wife Jane walked from her house to the police department to ask for help in finding her husband. The men, worn out from a night of chasing bootleggers, did what they could. But no one ever saw Jonathan Ketchem again... Now decades later, someone else is missing in Miller's Nicely done. Interesting theme to the plot. I love reading a series from the beginning, in order, and seeing how the characters and their lives evolve. Waiting anxiously to read the next one. On April 1, 1930, Jonathan Ketchem's wife Jane walked from her house to the police department to ask for help in finding her husband. The men, worn out from a night of chasing bootleggers, did what they could. But no one ever saw Jonathan Ketchem again... Now decades later, someone else is missing in Miller's Kill, NY. This time it's the physician of the clinic that bears the Ketchem name. Suspicion falls on a volatile single mother with a grudge against the doctor, but Reverend Clare Fergusson isn't convinced. As Clare and Russ investigate, they discover that the doctor's disappearance is linked to a bloody trail going all the way back to the hardscrabble Prohibition era. As they draw ever closer to the truth, their attraction for each other grows increasingly more difficult to resist. And their search threatens to uncover secrets that snake from one generation to the next-and to someone who's ready to kill.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    I love these so much. I think I'm changing my non-fiction book club to a series fiction book club because I DESPERATELY need to talk to someone about the end of the book. Let me quote a few passages and see if I can't get you hooked as well. This series is about a former army pilot turned female minister who's falling in love with a small town police chief. A MARRIED police chief. They solve a bunch of crimes together. "You can wait in the office, back here. I'll be with you as soon as I can." "It' I love these so much. I think I'm changing my non-fiction book club to a series fiction book club because I DESPERATELY need to talk to someone about the end of the book. Let me quote a few passages and see if I can't get you hooked as well. This series is about a former army pilot turned female minister who's falling in love with a small town police chief. A MARRIED police chief. They solve a bunch of crimes together. "You can wait in the office, back here. I'll be with you as soon as I can." "It's okay," Clare said. "I'm a priest." Without waiting to see what effect that complete irrelevance had on the woman, Clare charged up the stairs. p.47 ...He drank from his can. "What are you drinking?" "Decaffeinated Coke." "I'm having a Saranac Winter Ale. Ha ha ha." He laughed. "Do you normally taunt recovering alcoholics with your beer drinking?" "Just you. You're special." (conversation between the priest and the chief) p. 84 and lastly: If Clare had had a gun, she would have shot Debba herself. p.234 Clare's a priest. Read these books.

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