kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

Business Maharajas (Penguin business)

Availability: Ready to download

The inside track to India’s most powerful tycoons The eight business maharajas profiled here are among Asia’s most powerful industrial tycoons, Their combined turnover runs into billions of rupees, and between them they employ some 650,000 people, while indirectly affecting the lives of millions more. Sip a cup of tea, drive to work, listen to music, build a house…and the The inside track to India’s most powerful tycoons The eight business maharajas profiled here are among Asia’s most powerful industrial tycoons, Their combined turnover runs into billions of rupees, and between them they employ some 650,000 people, while indirectly affecting the lives of millions more. Sip a cup of tea, drive to work, listen to music, build a house…and the chances are that in these and a myriad other ways you are using products that they manufacture or market. By any yardstick, the achievements of these men would rank among the great business stories of our time. How did these men build their enormous empires? What are their management secrets? How did they thrive and prosper even as others failed? What is their vision for the future? Top business writer and industry insider Gita Piramal draws on exhaustive interviews and in-depth research to discover the answers to these and related questions in her profiles of the men who will lead the country’s push to become an industrial superpower in the 21st century.


Compare
kode adsense disini

The inside track to India’s most powerful tycoons The eight business maharajas profiled here are among Asia’s most powerful industrial tycoons, Their combined turnover runs into billions of rupees, and between them they employ some 650,000 people, while indirectly affecting the lives of millions more. Sip a cup of tea, drive to work, listen to music, build a house…and the The inside track to India’s most powerful tycoons The eight business maharajas profiled here are among Asia’s most powerful industrial tycoons, Their combined turnover runs into billions of rupees, and between them they employ some 650,000 people, while indirectly affecting the lives of millions more. Sip a cup of tea, drive to work, listen to music, build a house…and the chances are that in these and a myriad other ways you are using products that they manufacture or market. By any yardstick, the achievements of these men would rank among the great business stories of our time. How did these men build their enormous empires? What are their management secrets? How did they thrive and prosper even as others failed? What is their vision for the future? Top business writer and industry insider Gita Piramal draws on exhaustive interviews and in-depth research to discover the answers to these and related questions in her profiles of the men who will lead the country’s push to become an industrial superpower in the 21st century.

30 review for Business Maharajas (Penguin business)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sukant Jain

    This book is the compilation of the topmost Indian Businessman of India. This review would talk about the character/ personalities, their attitude toward everything, more, rather than they being righteous or they being wrong. I firmly believe same is the attitude of the author-“Impartial”. Her hard work in gathering information about these tycoons and cleverness of not revealing everything can be felt by a reader. Even then, the information given is more than appetite of any want to-be business This book is the compilation of the topmost Indian Businessman of India. This review would talk about the character/ personalities, their attitude toward everything, more, rather than they being righteous or they being wrong. I firmly believe same is the attitude of the author-“Impartial”. Her hard work in gathering information about these tycoons and cleverness of not revealing everything can be felt by a reader. Even then, the information given is more than appetite of any want to-be business tycoon. The book is really old, it was published in 1996. So, the present of all the tycoons is not hidden. Well the present proves the intelligence of the author in choosing only these 8 tycoons rather than just any other Tycoon. In Present, Reliance is on the top and still her way ahead, Kumar Mangalam has taken “Aditya Birla Group” to newer and better heights, Bajaj is manufacturing India’s best sports bike- Pulsar, Goenka Public School or college or university is known to atleast every Indian student, Tata has grown and is still growing under the value based leadership of Mr.Ratan Tata, and last but not the least Mr. Brij Mohan Khaitan is the world’s largest manufacturer of tea. The quality which can fascinate any of the reader, to read and re-read these biographies is that all of them are just like us –Humans. Honestly, they all face the same problems just any normal person does. Everyone of them has been through families divorce, everyone of them has faced problem of doing business in India, everyone of them at some point in their life has been bruised by Life very badly, and more importantly, the things which gave made them Maharaja’s are that every single one of them was driven by their own fire, Each one of them had a clear conscience, each one of them were many times very unreasonable to the world but never to themselves, each one of them loved their family the most, each one of them was humble, each one of them, in some way, always wanted to help people around them, None of them played with time- all of them were punctual, each one of them followed a self made routine- best suited for them and each one of them Dreamt Big!!!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mohit Choudhary

    Gita Piramal is a rare breed of business historians who have first hand access to prominent business families due to her own lineage; accounting for which she adds dollops of inside information and nuggets of wisdom in her books which only close family and friends of these business maharajas had been privy to. I landed on this book after reading Business Legends (by the same author) which celebrated the victories of another set of Indian business leaders. I especially liked the chapter on Dhirubh Gita Piramal is a rare breed of business historians who have first hand access to prominent business families due to her own lineage; accounting for which she adds dollops of inside information and nuggets of wisdom in her books which only close family and friends of these business maharajas had been privy to. I landed on this book after reading Business Legends (by the same author) which celebrated the victories of another set of Indian business leaders. I especially liked the chapter on Dhirubhai Ambani where she talks about his vision to dream of larger than life projects and his grit to execute them faster than any one else. The book closely examines how politics and business has been intertwined in India, even more prominently in the pre liberalisation era. If you wish to understand the Indian business ecosystem today, no better way to start from its past.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Boni Aditya

    Seven Business Houses that thrived the Socialist India, should have been a better title for this book, without any exception everyone of these business have had a tussle with the government and with the public, rioting their industries and going to strikes and lock downs. Socialist India has harassed businesses time and again and continues to do so even after liberalization. License Raj and Congress are the culprits of destroying this country down to its roots. Except Ambani who was ready to lic Seven Business Houses that thrived the Socialist India, should have been a better title for this book, without any exception everyone of these business have had a tussle with the government and with the public, rioting their industries and going to strikes and lock downs. Socialist India has harassed businesses time and again and continues to do so even after liberalization. License Raj and Congress are the culprits of destroying this country down to its roots. Except Ambani who was ready to lick the boots of bureaucrats and politicians and bribe them to get his work done, all the others who refused to comply was tortured, and had to fight tooth and nail to run their businesses, from the Income Tax department raiding the diamond merchants to the gutsy Khaitan who runs his business under the shadow of ULFA naxals with a private army to the Bajajs who had to endure riots in front of their business and their production controlled not by demand but by the govt permission. This socialist India is captured best in the AYN RAND NOVEL - ATLAS SHRUGGED where the govt decides how much steel must be produced, the great JRD had to endure this non-sense and stupidity of GOVT while running his steel giants of TELCO and TISCO. Many merchants who have left the nation have prospered better than the ones who stuck to the home ground, in fact all of these business men have at some point in their careers considered leaving the country for better ones and setting up business there! An extremely well written piece from a veteran journalist, this book captures the spirit of erst while Indian Environment, the export and import tariffs, the Emergency, Liberalization, assassinations of Prime Ministers and riots, the Bengal Communist idiocy that forced businessmen to flee Calcutta, everything is captured in an engaging manner. The inflection points of each of these businessmen and turning points of their careers is captured with precision. I am impressed. This is a great piece of anthology, yet all of them have endured these difficulties and survived the sick socialist India. Though Goenka had to spend a night on the cold jail floor before getting enlightened, other were quick to realize the sad environment they were in! I love the way the author introduces each of the scenarios i.e. the way she begins each of their stories, from a specific point in history and then introduces the characters after introducing the scenario and the situation. I had to salute these brave men who stood their ground against tyranny to make profit and to serve the nation, though the nation might not realize that they were served by these men. They did not shrug off their responsibilities and flee the nation, for better opportunities, instead they fought, a long and tiresome, utterly foolish battle. What does not kill you makes you stronger, well I guess it only made them stronger, the struggle to survive bureaucracy has made them develop strategies to handle these politicians and corrupt systems to such an extent that they have a cakewalk outside India. If you an survive this nonsense then you can survive anything!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Saurabh Deshmukh

    awsome collection... must read...

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sajith Kumar

    Businesses are sometimes likened to empires. Just like a real empire, every business concern encounters aggression from all corners, not necessarily armed ones. This mandates an intelligent, powerful and far seeing emperor at the centre. Such maharajas fend off predatory moves by competitors, devices plans for the routine administration and put in place programs by which more revenue could be earned. In a large business empire, the leader sits at the centre, sensitive to the slightest tremor on Businesses are sometimes likened to empires. Just like a real empire, every business concern encounters aggression from all corners, not necessarily armed ones. This mandates an intelligent, powerful and far seeing emperor at the centre. Such maharajas fend off predatory moves by competitors, devices plans for the routine administration and put in place programs by which more revenue could be earned. In a large business empire, the leader sits at the centre, sensitive to the slightest tremor on the web. This book showcases seven prominent business houses led by Dhirubhai Ambani, Rahul Bajaj, Aditya Birla, Rama Prasad Goenka, Brij Mohan Khaitan, Bharat and Vijay Shahs and Ratan Tata. Their combined turnover runs into billions of dollars and they employ millions. India looks at its entrepreneurs with suspicion and a touch of derision. Books like this bring out the human being in them – his fears, hopes and happiness. Reading about the buildup of a business empire, we wonder at how commonplace each step is, requiring nothing more than commonsense and a pinch of logical thinking. It is such ordinary steps that build magnificent edifices people wonder at. The history of a successful business entity thus instills confidence among people that such feats are not beyond their reach. Gita Piramal is a freelance journalist with a doctorate in business history. She has authored many books and is writing and commenting on the corporate sector for many decades. This book also brings to light some of the horrible stories of how a corrupt, socialist government meddled in industry and made a mess of it all. The most tragic feature of the License–Quota–Permit raj of the socialist era of post-independence India was the blatant intervention of the government in business. The bureaucrats who actually dabbled in this often had only a fleeting idea of what a business is, and was guided by left-leaning politicians, who corrupted the system. They even controlled capacity expansion of private industrial establishments. The production target was fixed by the government and you were not allowed to exceed it. Whenever it announced some liberal measures, it was solely intended to be of profit to a particular business house which greased the palms of Indira Gandhi and her sycophants. In 1971, she allowed the import of polyester filament yarn, against export of rayon fabrics to assist Ambani. After he built a filament yarn plant in India, it was withdrawn in 1979. Again, the country curtailed production of synthetic fabrics, which led to a spurt in smuggling that in turn helped the politicians in the form of kickbacks from smugglers. Sometimes, the decisions were so blatantly stupid that we’d be amazed at the thinly veiled pandering to some arcane socialist principle. In 1984, it granted a PTA (purified terephthalic acid) plant to Reliance, but will not give permission to its competitors, who received it only after the liberalization agenda was put in place in 1991. By then, Reliance could make a head start. Government even interfered in the management of private companies. It denied the extension of partnership of Bajaj with Vespa in 1971, citing that the company had become a monopoly. However, the real reason was that Kamalnayan Bajaj sided with the opponents of Indira when Congress split in 1969. This was at a time when people had to wait for years after booking a Bajaj scooter to take delivery! Flawed ideological affiliations of short-sighted politicians wreaked havoc in the industry when such people found power in their hands. George Fernandes, a socialist trade-union leader turned minister, drove out Coca Cola and IBM from India. He also compared the business community to rats. Nehru was also not free from the allegation of shortsightedness. He denied approval to Birla to set up an integrated steel plant in Bihar, on the flimsy argument that such plants were reserved for the public sector. This greatly upset Birla, who had already found a U.S. partner for the plant. In the end, Nehru allowed to set up Hindalco, as some kind of consolation. The one thing we note repeatedly in the book is that there is no clear cut path to success. These winners have each taken an unknown trail through the wilderness to reach glory. There are countless others who fell by the wayside and we will never come across their stories. The diversity of the successful entrepreneurs in their modus operandi is humongous. Ambani, whose name was said to be an acronym for ambition and money, was a proponent of backward integration. He began with textiles, which is an end product for consumers, and worked his way backward through the intermediate chain like polyester, petrochemicals, refinery and finally, oil exploration. Sometimes, fights between industrialists broke out, who go all out in devising means for humbling the opponent. One such illustrative case is described by the author, which must be mentioned. The newspaper Indian Express carried a series of stinging articles against Ambani and Reliance in 1986-87, causing much harm to its business interests. This was later turned out to be designed to favour Nusli Wadia of Bombay Dyeing in their tussle against Reliance. Wadia’s closeness to Ramnath Goenka, who controlled Indian Express, was legendary. People like Vijay Shah were very flamboyant, while Ram Prasad Goenka was reclusive to the point of not even divulging the names of books he was reading so as not to present an opportunity for others to gauge his personality! Then again, some are attracted to high risk-taking, while others are averse to it. Birla never made a product that required large-scale promotion and stayed away from consumer products which were risky. Businessmen like Tatas were thrifty, while others like Vijay and Bharat Shahs were extravagant. When the opulence at Shah’s daughter’s wedding exceeded all limits, public protest marred the proceedings. The boasting of the Shahs reproduced in the book – if true – is a challenge to the rule of law. He claims to have made the Thai government fall in line to grant him tax exemption by threatening to walk out. He organized traders’ protest against taxmen who raided his offices to search for income tax evasions. His construction companies were notorious for not honouring their commitment to handover residential flats at the proper time. Gita Piramal has done a wonderful job in compiling a book of this kind that is also eminently readable. Credit must be given to her in formulating criteria to select the businessmen who were to be covered in the text. The author hit upon three parameters for objective analysis – look into the past and the future, territorial dominance and talent from established business families. The third criterion ruled out professional managers and self-made entrepreneurs like IT stalwarts. Vijay Mallya is curiously omitted, which is all the more prescient considering the financial scams he fell into. The book was published in 1996, and the information is hence slightly dated. It is high time a revised version hit the stands. The book includes the family trees of all seven clans, which is a nice place to scout for some very good baby names for those so inclined! An impressive bibliography and a basic index add value to the work. A set of photographs would’ve added more interest. The book is highly recommended.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Niraj Chaudhary

    It is a good book to get a sense of what it was like to do business in pre-liberalization India. Your business strategy succeeded not because it was most market friendly but rather it was aligned with prevalent policies. Your poor business acumen can be dismissed if you know the right people in government or can pull right strings. If I'd sum up then the business environment was simply suffocating. But the above is not the primary focus. Primary focus is a bunch of men, who surprisingly or perhap It is a good book to get a sense of what it was like to do business in pre-liberalization India. Your business strategy succeeded not because it was most market friendly but rather it was aligned with prevalent policies. Your poor business acumen can be dismissed if you know the right people in government or can pull right strings. If I'd sum up then the business environment was simply suffocating. But the above is not the primary focus. Primary focus is a bunch of men, who surprisingly or perhaps not so, all belong to a small region in Rajasthan and Gujarat. Of course there is a Parsi, Tata. How these men negotiated various challenges makes an interesting read, though won't satisfy you. Given there's so much to cover, it only touches upon many incidents. The book didn't age well either. Reading in 2019, it was like a history book talking about times long foregone. The numbers, not even a shadow of what we hear these days thanks to rapid growth since 1996 when the book was published.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Chetan Suralkar

    This book gives a great insight in lifes of all this famous Indian business tycoons. Not only that but this book explore a wide history of indian businesses from post independence era to pre globalization India. Also gives us an insight on how horrible the ' Licence Raj ' were. Although past globalization, India have changed a lot. Overall a best read. It would have been better if the sequence of events were in chronological order as sometimes narration seem very confusing because it has various This book gives a great insight in lifes of all this famous Indian business tycoons. Not only that but this book explore a wide history of indian businesses from post independence era to pre globalization India. Also gives us an insight on how horrible the ' Licence Raj ' were. Although past globalization, India have changed a lot. Overall a best read. It would have been better if the sequence of events were in chronological order as sometimes narration seem very confusing because it has various numbers and dates to remember. Highly recommended

  8. 4 out of 5

    Apoorv Mathur

    Good to capture the Indian Business context.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Anshul Gupta

    Crisp and short

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ankur Gajjaria

    This book is a good primer on the background and stories of how large Indian business conglomerates have started and flourished against all odds.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Marvin Musfiq

    Best book to know about Indian Entrepreneurs biography.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Abhishek Kolwankar

    A brief history of how Ambani, Tata, Birla and the other Indian Business Maharajas made big!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Akansha Arora

    This one talks about the business icons of 'yesteryears'. One gets an interesting insight into the styles of the founding leaders of some of the best Indian organizations and the kind of restrictions the businesses were operating in before liberalization.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sumeet Mahendra

    I've borrowed it from library so didn't read it completely, but the exhaustive history of country prominent business czars is an essential read, particularly for entrepreneurs, industrialists or one from business families, as I am...

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ankush Agrawal

    A very powerful book. And crispily written. The book has some slackness at some points, but it keeps up the pace of like a thriller and is a goo read. For a person looking to lap up business insights and business history, this is a good book to start with.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Gaurav talera

    giving you a more positive attitude. tells about successful indian business ppl,you will find that they dnt only have shear luck in there side but also it was courage,hardwork,skills & dynamiscm which made them grow. can gain a lot of positive energy.gud buk giving you a more positive attitude. tells about successful indian business ppl,you will find that they dnt only have shear luck in there side but also it was courage,hardwork,skills & dynamiscm which made them grow. can gain a lot of positive energy.gud buk

  17. 4 out of 5

    Apoorv Purohit

    A small peep into many of the Big Business Houses in India It's nice to know more about them, the person, the family and the business who made big The book portrays none as grey, so don't expect to have real inside scoop here Can read

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jyotsna Sanghi

    From Khaitans to Ambanis, she takes you a tour to all the stalwarts. Loved it

  19. 4 out of 5

    Pratik Patankar

    A wonderful collection of personalities and a great way to introduce yourself to the business tycoons of India.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ashish Sharma

    Stories well told...all throughout the book you grow more and more in awe of the great personalities..was my first book in business world and the most cherished one

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kiran Chaugule

    Draws a picture of the personalities with some very interesting anecdotes from their lives - one of the best books I've read.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Vatsal Dusad

    A must read for the one who wants to do the business in India. The tales of the most shrewd and talented men who created the foundation of Indian economy.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Shoonyo

    amazingly inspiring, a book on the life of some selected indian business tycoons... gives u just the kick you need.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mohd Asim

    Sir please send me the soft copy so that i can read this book.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Prateek Jain

    Good book about History of grat Indian businessman and their Vision and tactics

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mugdha

  27. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

  28. 4 out of 5

    Radhika

  29. 5 out of 5

    Anang Raj

  30. 4 out of 5

    Nirav

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.