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Superman: Action Comics, Volume 2: Bulletproof

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Clark Kent is dead! When grave circumstances cause Superman to leave behind his alter ego, an unimpeded Man of Steel must face his deadliest foe to date: Nimrod the Hunter! Metropolis' newest threat has killed everything he's ever tracked, but he's never killed an alien. Will the red and blue Kryptonian be his first? Legendary writer Grant Morrison (ALL-STAR SUPERMAN, Clark Kent is dead! When grave circumstances cause Superman to leave behind his alter ego, an unimpeded Man of Steel must face his deadliest foe to date: Nimrod the Hunter! Metropolis' newest threat has killed everything he's ever tracked, but he's never killed an alien. Will the red and blue Kryptonian be his first? Legendary writer Grant Morrison (ALL-STAR SUPERMAN, BATMAN) continues his best-selling, critically acclaimed run on SUPERMAN: ACTION COMICS, with art by Rags Morales (IDENTITY CRISIS), Gene Ha (TOP 10) and a host of comics' finest illustrators. Collects SUPERMAN – ACTION COMICS 9-12, 0 and ANNUAL 1.


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Clark Kent is dead! When grave circumstances cause Superman to leave behind his alter ego, an unimpeded Man of Steel must face his deadliest foe to date: Nimrod the Hunter! Metropolis' newest threat has killed everything he's ever tracked, but he's never killed an alien. Will the red and blue Kryptonian be his first? Legendary writer Grant Morrison (ALL-STAR SUPERMAN, Clark Kent is dead! When grave circumstances cause Superman to leave behind his alter ego, an unimpeded Man of Steel must face his deadliest foe to date: Nimrod the Hunter! Metropolis' newest threat has killed everything he's ever tracked, but he's never killed an alien. Will the red and blue Kryptonian be his first? Legendary writer Grant Morrison (ALL-STAR SUPERMAN, BATMAN) continues his best-selling, critically acclaimed run on SUPERMAN: ACTION COMICS, with art by Rags Morales (IDENTITY CRISIS), Gene Ha (TOP 10) and a host of comics' finest illustrators. Collects SUPERMAN – ACTION COMICS 9-12, 0 and ANNUAL 1.

30 review for Superman: Action Comics, Volume 2: Bulletproof

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jayson

    (B) 75% | More than Satisfactory Notes: A tired tapas medley of middling morsels, neither filling nor flavorful, it’s decently done though ultimately ordinary.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    This volume was straight-up bizarre. First, we start out on Earth 23 with black President Superman, who is Calvin Ellis and not Clark Kent. Just ... why? Why are we suddenly on Earth 23? Why is Superman President? What does this have to do with the future issues in this series? Ok, so kind of random and pointless, but not an awful story idea. The middle issues aren't that bad either, but then Lois gets hurt and Superman takes her to a hospital. Um. Ok. Great, but I don't think that's exactly This volume was straight-up bizarre. First, we start out on Earth 23 with black President Superman, who is Calvin Ellis and not Clark Kent. Just ... why? Why are we suddenly on Earth 23? Why is Superman President? What does this have to do with the future issues in this series? Ok, so kind of random and pointless, but not an awful story idea. The middle issues aren't that bad either, but then Lois gets hurt and Superman takes her to a hospital. Um. Ok. Great, but I don't think that's exactly sanitary or a sterile instrument. Who knows what's under Superman's nails?? Gross. No. I do not accept that Superman can just read a USB drive. Then finally we have this ridiculousness: Someone buy that lady some vowels. But seriously, wtf is up with this volume? It was just really weird, all around.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    We’re in the second volume and already an alternate universe story. GAH! This is DC’s Achilles’ heel (that and endle$$ly rebooting continuity*). It ‘s an interesting story, (Lois, a barbequed Clark Kent and Superman’s Pal Jimmy Olsen end up meeting an African-American Superman, who’s alter-ego is the President of the United States) but what does it have to do with the main storyline? In this volume, absolutely nothing! I don’t mind an occasional alternate universe storyline, as long as it’s We’re in the second volume and already an alternate universe story. GAH! This is DC’s Achilles’ heel (that and endle$$ly rebooting continuity*). It ‘s an interesting story, (Lois, a barbequed Clark Kent and Superman’s Pal Jimmy Olsen end up meeting an African-American Superman, who’s alter-ego is the President of the United States) but what does it have to do with the main storyline? In this volume, absolutely nothing! I don’t mind an occasional alternate universe storyline, as long as it’s simple to follow (just throw a goatee on Spock and mix with hambone acting and voila!) and has some relevance in the real (whatever the hell that means) universe. Grant Morrison, who has written some terrific Superman stuff (see volume one of this mess), only wrote the first half of this volume. It didn’t help! The art measures up to the writing. *Marvel’s are clones and HUBRIS.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    What the hell was this? It's a choppy disorienting mess that has no cohesive storyline. Or at least none that I could figure out. I'm pissed! I loved volume one! And now this?! Maybe it will all tie together in volume three? I'll read it, but it's going to the bottom of my TBR pile.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Bookwraiths

    Not sure what the hell I just read. It was all over the place with an alternate universe story, tales of Superman's early days in Metropolis, and other (even less) interest things. Since I know I actually like Superman, I'm going to blame it on Morrison's style, which is getting more and more annoying to me. (And, yes, I know he only wrote half the issues collected here, but he gets the blame even so.) My advice: stay the hell away from this unless you love Morrison.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Artemy

    Another fantastic volume of Action Comics from Morrison. The dude just gets Superman right, and always comes up with such fun and smart stories for the character. I also was surprised by how much I enjoy Sholly Fisch’s backup stories, they always read like a logical continuation of Morrison’s work, and they never feel like a chore to read, which is an incredible achievement for backup stories. Excellent stuff all around!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

    Pretty much liked the entirety of this book. Morrison has some great ideas, but his stream of consciousness way of writing and proceeding from one issue to the next is vexing at times. I still don't understand the purpose of the black Superman story. it was interesting but disrupted the flow of things. I think the book would be better served by printing the backups after the main stories like in the monthly books. They would make much more sense that way. The new Captain Comet is very intriguing Pretty much liked the entirety of this book. Morrison has some great ideas, but his stream of consciousness way of writing and proceeding from one issue to the next is vexing at times. I still don't understand the purpose of the black Superman story. it was interesting but disrupted the flow of things. I think the book would be better served by printing the backups after the main stories like in the monthly books. They would make much more sense that way. The new Captain Comet is very intriguing and I would love to see more. Overall, really dug the art, especially Ben Oliver on the zero issue.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Sigal

    I have always thought that Morrison is a no-talent hack who believes that shock-value equals a great story. It doesn't, Grant. Sorry, but even though you have occasional moments of brilliance, this collection did nothing to make me change my 'hack' opinion of you. I will stick through Vol 3 just so I can have closure (and give you the chance to redeem yourself), but it's not looking good, buddy. This volume was disjointed, and frankly, the inclusion of the Annual made it even less cohesive than I have always thought that Morrison is a no-talent hack who believes that shock-value equals a great story. It doesn't, Grant. Sorry, but even though you have occasional moments of brilliance, this collection did nothing to make me change my 'hack' opinion of you. I will stick through Vol 3 just so I can have closure (and give you the chance to redeem yourself), but it's not looking good, buddy. This volume was disjointed, and frankly, the inclusion of the Annual made it even less cohesive than Morrison's already adled mind had, so I did not enjoy reading this at all. Nice art, but I come for the story, and I'm not really sure that I read one. That's not a good sign.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    I was shocked by how much I liked the first volume of New 52's Action Comics. Because honestly, I don't really care for Superman. But Morrison had been able to make the guy interesting, without straying too far from what I think of as the core of the character. Alas, no such luck here. Maybe I just fundamentally don't care for Superman, no matter what anyone does with him. But there was at least one storyline here that I think would have irritated me with any character. (view spoiler)[Let's kill I was shocked by how much I liked the first volume of New 52's Action Comics. Because honestly, I don't really care for Superman. But Morrison had been able to make the guy interesting, without straying too far from what I think of as the core of the character. Alas, no such luck here. Maybe I just fundamentally don't care for Superman, no matter what anyone does with him. But there was at least one storyline here that I think would have irritated me with any character. (view spoiler)[Let's kill the Clark Kent identity! No, wait, that was a terrible idea. I know! Let's make sure that everybody forgets it ever happened! We are not amused. (hide spoiler)] I'm not sure if I'll keep going with volume three, but it's more likely than not. This volume was decent, at least, despite that one storyline.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kyle

    So.... When DC wants to not only kill something, but also annihilate it's very soul, they give it to Grant Morrison, right? Add Action Comics to the growing list of Morrison's victims. I think I was able to tolerate this simply because of Morales' artwork, which was a huge improvement from his disconnected illustrations in the first volume. For the most part (or I should say, when the text allows it) there is some fluid, cohesive visual storytelling. It's the writing that evaporates any hope that So.... When DC wants to not only kill something, but also annihilate it's very soul, they give it to Grant Morrison, right? Add Action Comics to the growing list of Morrison's victims. I think I was able to tolerate this simply because of Morales' artwork, which was a huge improvement from his disconnected illustrations in the first volume. For the most part (or I should say, when the text allows it) there is some fluid, cohesive visual storytelling. It's the writing that evaporates any hope that I might have for an Action Comics redemption. There is no way that Morrison will be able to dig his way out of this hole. Whatever he has started with this Superman run can not possibly be saved. A parallel President Superman?? A mind-manipulating, Forgotten Superman?? Doctor Superman!!!!! My GAWD!!!!! This is terrible stuff. I mean, all you need to do is read the last instalment of the Bulletproof storyline to understand just how far-fetched Morrison let this become. Utter nonsense. 1.5/5

  11. 4 out of 5

    Geoff Derks

    A jumbled mess. Grant Morrison is very hit or miss with me (80% of the latter) in his books. Rags Morales, however, has done a beautiful job with the artwork in his issues. While there are some interesting ideas and hints of larger stories looming, the setting of "Action Comics" may be its undoing. "Action Comics" is like Superman's early years in Metropolis, and is set 5 years before the "Superman" series in the New 52. So everything that is written in this series has to have some effect on A jumbled mess. Grant Morrison is very hit or miss with me (80% of the latter) in his books. Rags Morales, however, has done a beautiful job with the artwork in his issues. While there are some interesting ideas and hints of larger stories looming, the setting of "Action Comics" may be its undoing. "Action Comics" is like Superman's early years in Metropolis, and is set 5 years before the "Superman" series in the New 52. So everything that is written in this series has to have some effect on "current" Superman. I can see how that can be stressful to authors and editors. My only hope is that in the future, this series takes readers up to where "Superman" began in the DCnU, and then jump ahead. There are 527 Batman Comics doing that very thing in the same Universe. It has been proven it works! SIDENOTE: Not every Batman comic is on equal ground in the DCnU. For every wonderfully written "Batman" comic by Scott Snyder, there is David Finch's disappointing "Batman: The Dark Knight."

  12. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    Not as triumphant as the previous volume, but not a total wash, either. As a compulsive buyer of Superman tshirts I was glad there was a subplot about ca$hing in on...Superman tshirts! The Elseworlds stuff with President Superman I could have lived without, but the glimpse at Mister Mxyzptlk-related stuff was trippy, as was the Big Bad connected to Kal-El's arrival on Earth. I would recommend it for Superfans, definitely.

  13. 4 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Some Interesting ideas, and fun moments, mixed in with confusing as fuck plot and horrible side characters. Everybody comes off over the top and corny, and the main enemy in this makes no sense. Also, what the hell is happening half the time? Why do we suddenly jump so many goddamn years ahead, then back to the start. The art is great, but the story itself is a gigantic fucking mess.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Gavin

    You know what I love? When you write a long review and your computer eats it. Ya. SUPER. Speaking of SUPER-MAN...Grant Morrison has a SUPER imagination. I seriously love that his take on Supes isn't boring. If people really hate this, go read a Dan Jurgens early-mid 90s Superman book; then come back and see how bad you think Grant is... While I love all the ideas and all the potential, this is kinda jumping all over the place, which is a little frustrating, and I'm never sure what's alternate You know what I love? When you write a long review and your computer eats it. Ya. SUPER. Speaking of SUPER-MAN...Grant Morrison has a SUPER imagination. I seriously love that his take on Supes isn't boring. If people really hate this, go read a Dan Jurgens early-mid 90s Superman book; then come back and see how bad you think Grant is... While I love all the ideas and all the potential, this is kinda jumping all over the place, which is a little frustrating, and I'm never sure what's alternate world, future, past, present etc. (and no, I'm not dense.) There are a few great interactions with Superman and Batman, who plays sort of a surrogate older brother figure (except one that is very suspicious of the younger alien - pay attention and you'll see just how so.) I also enjoyed 'Captain Comet'/Adam Blake/The Forgotten Superman. Way to hand it to Grant to bring someone out of the past and make him relevant. It would also seem he heads a team which is some mix of the Guardians of the Galaxy and the Illuminati. Cool-ish, good potential. There are so many things going on here, there's years worth of stories that can be built on this foundation, which is great, and that's the part that really works for me, that this Superman isn't limited to fighting aliens and stopping bank robberies. Hell, this one even wants to fight poverty in Africa, and asks the Justice League for help (and to adopt a couple of hamsters...yes that's right). This has got some really funny stuff in it as well. Like others, I'm confused as to why he bounces back and forth between his awesome costume and his T-Shirts and Jeans with Cape...(also a cool side story about how that got started). Lots of origins of bad-guys and characters here, almost too many to keep track of. The book opens in an alternate universe with Calvin Ellis (get it?) the Barack Obama Superman. This actually sets up some shit that goes down in Vol. 3 which is fun. This is really more philosophical and idea driven than Superman has ever been (other than say, All-Star Superman by ...Grant Morrison). If you like your Superman more down to Earth, there's #0 which tells of Superman losing his cape, the young boy who finds it and saves his family from abuse, only to wind up in the path of a steaming locomotive...along with the Alex Ross-like artwork, this is a great old-fashioned Superman story that Morrison is also capable of producing. I didn't care for the Superman Annual with Kryptonite Man(which wasn't Morrison writing) that has Supes team up with Steel, just not great, though I did enjoy the Cully Hamner (RED) art. There are also tons of smaller stories in the book as well, including one about Calvin Ellis doing exactly what Batman (of our world) was worried Superman (of our world) would do...there's a discussion about what's morally correct and the nature of absolute power, so it's clear this Superman book is not going to be punch ups after punchups. If you pay close attention (I missed it initially, but upon reviewing while I was writing this) you'll notice that Morrison actually tells us word for word what's going to happen at the end of the story (in Vol. 3) and it's pretty cool that you don't even notice (if you did, good for you). What else happens here? Oh right: Clark Kent dies, Lois Lane is on death's doorstep, aliens kidnap a child, and the final story is SUPER CREEPY involving an alternate Superman...that's pure spooky. In conclusion, this is a 5-star book of ideas, which can be a springboard to go all kinds of places with the characters and Superman. Hopefully that's what happens, because Morrison has an obvious love for the character and his potential, which we never really see tapped (the main point I think Morrison is making here). That being said, I can see how the back and forth, sci-fi, confusing stuff here will turn some people off. I'd at least give it a chance, and if you don't like it, no worries, but don't say there weren't a few cool ideas...

  15. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    Always spoilers ahead. Is there a button I can check on here? There should be a button I can check for all my spoiler-filled reviews. There are moments in this book that are great. (I feel like I say that every time.) Superman's fighting a bizarre (but not Bizzaro) version of himself (sorta) who has crazy mind control powers and is wrecking Metropolis, and a little girl with the same sort of mind control powers uses her humanity to save Superman and Lois both. THAT was awesome. Grant Morrison's Always spoilers ahead. Is there a button I can check on here? There should be a button I can check for all my spoiler-filled reviews. There are moments in this book that are great. (I feel like I say that every time.) Superman's fighting a bizarre (but not Bizzaro) version of himself (sorta) who has crazy mind control powers and is wrecking Metropolis, and a little girl with the same sort of mind control powers uses her humanity to save Superman and Lois both. THAT was awesome. Grant Morrison's creepy weirdness shone through and it was a nice little story. The T-shirt salesman recounting Superman saving him from a burglary? Pretty great, also. The story of the kid retrieving Superman's cape and standing up to a bully? That might have been the best story in the whole batch. There's also a one-shot silent issue (that means no talking or words) of some villian. The art there is great, and I kind of wish more superhero comics would leave more words out like that more often. Back in the late 90s there were a couple of silent Green Arrow comics that were fantastic. They played out like a carefully scripted martial arts movie. Okay, that's all the good stuff. But the stuff I didn't like: Grant Morrison's alternate universe of superheroes. I'm not sure why that was even included. It had no bearing on the current Superman storyline. It's a very cool (and very needed) take on all the superheroes to switch their race up- but why not go full-force with it and make Action Comics with that hero? Why does it have to be this confounding off-shoot that's included as a token? The pacing was strange in all the stories except for the short ones I mentioned above. There's Lex, and Misses Myxysptlyk (apologies, spelling) and then K-man, and the mental guy... And Jimmy's a rich kid? Let the story breathe a little. Maybe I have wild expectations for Grant Morrison. I read his run on Animal Man a few years ago and poured through every comic. I couldn't wait to get to the next one. It was weird and cool and he did all kinds of crazy things with characters but still made you care for them. This feels a little like he's just grabbing his Superman action figure and tossing him around the room. I guess I want a little more empathy. I'd say pass this one up. Too much wordy word bubbles. Too many characters just thrown onto the page. If you do read it, flip to those single issues I mentioned above. They're really really good.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    I'll be the first to admit that this volume is a mess. However, I don't think it has anything to do with Grant Morrison's writing. For some reason, DC chose to collect this volume (and several other New 52 second volumes) in a way that doesn't tell you exactly what you're reading, which makes it extremely hard to follow at first. To begin with, this volume contains several things: -Grant Morrison's lead stories from Action Comics 9-12 -Sholly Fisch's backup stores from AC 9-12 -Grant Morrison's I'll be the first to admit that this volume is a mess. However, I don't think it has anything to do with Grant Morrison's writing. For some reason, DC chose to collect this volume (and several other New 52 second volumes) in a way that doesn't tell you exactly what you're reading, which makes it extremely hard to follow at first. To begin with, this volume contains several things: -Grant Morrison's lead stories from Action Comics 9-12 -Sholly Fisch's backup stores from AC 9-12 -Grant Morrison's lead story from Action Comics 0, a flashback story -Sholly Fisch's backup story from AC0 -Action Comics Annual by Sholly Fisch, which takes place at an unclear point amidst the other issues Instead of, say, labeling all of this clearly and separating it in a followable way, DC chose to just kind of jam all this in there in order of Author Importance. So, Morrison's stuff comes first, then it suddenly shifts gears into Fisch's backup stories without explaining why, then it hits the annual at the end. It's terribly laid out. So then why am I giving it 4 stars? Because I feel like, knowing all of that going in, I knew how to read this book, and having very recently read volume 1, I was anxious to know how Morrison's big, weird story was going to play out. And now, I'm really liking it. He's playing with lots of similar themes in this one (how big must your acts be to make you a true hero, how important is the Clark Kent identity for Superman, etc.), only now they feel like they're building to something. He's doing what he does best: taking big sci-fi ideas and infusing them with philosophy and humanity. Now, this definitely won't be for everyone. It rockets forward at a pace that doesn't allow it to quite sit with most of these ideas, and thus feels a little splatter-painted. But I still think it's affective overall. And with the ending to this volume clearly setting up a bigger story for volume 3, I'm excited to keep reading. Here's hoping Morrison pulls it off!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin

    I'm glad I came here to see what others were saying bout this volume, because I don't get it either. I thought I just didn't know how to read comics in general anymore, or just Morrison's idea of a story. But the volume was not good. If you are trying to introduce new readers to comics via the New 52, why throw in an alternate universe story in an early issue? It's confusing! I had to go online to understand what was going on. The main story in this volume--some "neo sapien" hunting others of I'm glad I came here to see what others were saying bout this volume, because I don't get it either. I thought I just didn't know how to read comics in general anymore, or just Morrison's idea of a story. But the volume was not good. If you are trying to introduce new readers to comics via the New 52, why throw in an alternate universe story in an early issue? It's confusing! I had to go online to understand what was going on. The main story in this volume--some "neo sapien" hunting others of his species, who happens to be Lois' niece-- is only a couple issues long and is mired amongst a whole lot of other things going on, like already having Clark deciding to change his secret identity? The rest is just like a collection of independent short stories like a set of appendices. They include some okay stories like a kid getting his cape and him placing an order for his tshirts, but there's also more alternate Superman, the creation of a K-Man, and this weird, brief purple monster. I totally did not get the flow of this volume. At all. I just can't follow the erratic panels and stories. Another example, how superman keeps changing between his tshirt and jeans and his full suit. Is this intentional? They sure don't indicate it, if so. Feels more like editorial missteps. We see him stomping some bad guys in his jeans, then meets with the JL in his suit, then a few pages later he's back in his jeans. This whole volume feels like a jumbled mess. Makes me sad because Superman is my favorite.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    After a dismal reboot with Action Comics Vol 1, Morrison disappoints with yet another lame collection of Superman stories. He doesn't write them all, but its a very scattered collection, with not much focus. There are some good parts here and there, but the boring parts stop the good stuff from shining through. I'm talking about re-inventing Kryptonite Man as K-Man, who is the exact same guy, but this time he's a wife beater who is looking for his battered wife. BORING! The only good parts were After a dismal reboot with Action Comics Vol 1, Morrison disappoints with yet another lame collection of Superman stories. He doesn't write them all, but its a very scattered collection, with not much focus. There are some good parts here and there, but the boring parts stop the good stuff from shining through. I'm talking about re-inventing Kryptonite Man as K-Man, who is the exact same guy, but this time he's a wife beater who is looking for his battered wife. BORING! The only good parts were the weird villain introduced at the end of the volume, the superman's cape story, and superman first printing out his t-shirts and foiling a robbery. Out of all the stories, the best is the one where Superman saves Lois' life by doing super-speed surgery after she is hit by a bus. The synopsis for the third volume is that a group of villain from the Multiverse attacks Superman, which sounds very intriguing. This volume tried to dabble in the parallel worlds angle with a Black President Superman (Obama), but it was barely a set up for that cool sounding third volume. I won't have high hopes for the third volume of Action Comics, but if its sucks then I'm done with this series of Superman for good.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Anthony

    A little better than volume 1. I didn't take to Morrisons run on Action Comics the first time I read it (month to month as it was published), and re-reading it now, I feel the same way. The highlights in this volume are superman reading an entire medical library in seconds and then performing surgery himself to save Lois (which was crazy and cool and a classic silver age superman/Lois save) and the 0 (Zero) issue is very good. Could Ben Oliver not have done more and Rags Morales done less?

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Grant Morrison writes some excellent issues - shame it's only half the book! Lots of great Superman moments make this the best Superman book of the year so far. Full review here!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    This was just a mess. It was just a jumble of a mess. This was not really a complete story but rather a bunch of issues thrown together that do not connect or make sense. I really want to like Superman but they are making it very hard.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Logan

    Another great volume, which was done great! The villain was very interesting, had a great origin story which was integrated into superman's origin story! Aside from that story, there was one issue from earth 23 where superman is African-American, that was pretty cool!

  23. 4 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    A hair better than the previous volume, but this has truly been a waste of my reading time.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    Oof. I adore Morrison's "All-Star Superman," and I enjoyed the first volume of his run on Action Comics. But this is just bad. The opening story sets the (preachy, smug, insufferable) tone: it's all about how nobody remembers what Superman is REALLY about and how now he's used as a tool of consumerism and fascism and as a way to distract us sheeple from our "dull obedient lives." But don't worry! The great and glorious Writer is here to teach all us Normals about Superman "done right." I admire Oof. I adore Morrison's "All-Star Superman," and I enjoyed the first volume of his run on Action Comics. But this is just bad. The opening story sets the (preachy, smug, insufferable) tone: it's all about how nobody remembers what Superman is REALLY about and how now he's used as a tool of consumerism and fascism and as a way to distract us sheeple from our "dull obedient lives." But don't worry! The great and glorious Writer is here to teach all us Normals about Superman "done right." I admire Morrison for biting the hand that feeds him, but this feels waaaaay more like he's stroking his own ego than offering a real critique of his corporate overlords at DC/Warner Bros. The smugness continues in the next arc of this volume. Superman decides to kill off his Clark Kent alter ego (through dubious methods and for dubious reasons) and become a firefighter named Johnny Clark. But then, Batman convinces him this was a mistake because "the world needs heroes," and apparently journalists are heroes, but firefighters aren't (WTF, Morrison). Luckily, there are zero real consequences in this book, so the whole planet gets mind-wiped, and Superman gets a mulligan on the whole "faking his death" thing. There's other cringe-inducing moments too, like when Superman and Batman have a debate about whether foreign humanitarian aid is really just a soft form of American Imperialism while the rest of the Justice League stands around looking bored and uncomfortable. Or like whenever Morrison attempts to emulate the speech patterns of everyday "man-on-the-street" Americans (actual quote from a background character: "This is out of my league...like supermodels!" Or like when Superman ends child abuse through the power of magical thinking. I could go on, but I think you get the idea.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jennie Vance

    It's hard to decide what's worse about this book. Is it Calvin Ellis and his parallel universe black Superman and it's stereotyping and bad after school special feel?* Is it the deus ex machinas ("I just read every medical text ever written.")? Is it Kal's insistence that the Justice League isn't serious about the mission because they won't go into other countries and risk war? Here's a thought, Superman: Maybe the King of Atlantis and the Princess of Themyscira know a smidge more about It's hard to decide what's worse about this book. Is it Calvin Ellis and his parallel universe black Superman and it's stereotyping and bad after school special feel?* Is it the deus ex machinas ("I just read every medical text ever written.")? Is it Kal's insistence that the Justice League isn't serious about the mission because they won't go into other countries and risk war? Here's a thought, Superman: Maybe the King of Atlantis and the Princess of Themyscira know a smidge more about international relations than you do! Is it Clark Kent faking his own death for reasons that are never very clear? Oh, and under very dubious circumstances, I'd like to add. That bomber was awfully convenient. I'm starting to think the criminal in the copy shop (which was already odd) might have been a ploy to get free T-shirts. A side note: I always made fun of people in Metropolis for not being able to see that Clark is Superman. Now, I am concerned they're all suffering from one of those brain conditions that makes it impossible to recognize faces. Kal (or Johnny Clark, ugh) spends most of the volume out in the open with no mask or glasses or anything and no one seems to put two and two together. Calvin Ellis is the worst example. He is the President of the United States, arguably one of the most recognizable men on the planet, and people still can't tell that's he's Superman. *Just to be super (heh heh) clear: I have no problems with the idea of a black Superman. I think that could be very interesting! But, for Rao's sake, at least write it well.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    Sooo... I'm giving this three stars to average the two ways to read this and my reaction to them... If you take this volume as a continuous story, it's all over the place, hard to follow, and I'm still not sure what the actual plot was. If you take this as a collection of loosely related stories that are not in any particular order, then it becomes much more interesting. I'm not sure which was the actual intent of the writers, but if there was an overarching plot across the whole book it was too Sooo... I'm giving this three stars to average the two ways to read this and my reaction to them... If you take this volume as a continuous story, it's all over the place, hard to follow, and I'm still not sure what the actual plot was. If you take this as a collection of loosely related stories that are not in any particular order, then it becomes much more interesting. I'm not sure which was the actual intent of the writers, but if there was an overarching plot across the whole book it was too convoluted for me to follow it. I really like the stories with Calvin Ellis as President and Superman, that was an interesting alternative universe idea, although I'm not sure how it's related to the primary universe. And I liked the one where Superman reaches out to Batman for guidance, but I love pretty much any Superman/Batman interaction. If you read this I hope you have better luck than me following the plot.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Paige

    This was some pretty typical New 52 Superman stuff. A very hard to follow storyline with a very confusing plot. Also the stories about the alternate universe Superman were so much more interesting then the stories of our Superman, but those parts were snuck in in such a way that it made it difficult for me to figure out which reality I was in until a couple pages in. There wasn't any overarching plot which would've been fine if any of the stories had any sort of resolution. It was pretty much This was some pretty typical New 52 Superman stuff. A very hard to follow storyline with a very confusing plot. Also the stories about the alternate universe Superman were so much more interesting then the stories of our Superman, but those parts were snuck in in such a way that it made it difficult for me to figure out which reality I was in until a couple pages in. There wasn't any overarching plot which would've been fine if any of the stories had any sort of resolution. It was pretty much like jumping into one odd story to the next. I even had difficulty telling when one comic started and ended, which is something I've never encountered before. I keep giving this books a try hoping they'll be like the Superman I know and love but no dice so far.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    My full video review: http://youtu.be/4BoggRJ4Zzw

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jesse A

    Not nearly as bad as volume 1. Still not great.

  30. 5 out of 5

    David Dalton

    Starting to make some sense and I applaud DC's efforts to invigorate the Superman legend/character. I have just recently read the New 52 collections of Superman Vols 1 & 2, and now Action Vols 1 & 2. Next up is Superman #3. All from my digital library. Then I will move over to New 52 and the first 3 volumes there. Might have to break down sooner or later and buy some collections. I do have Superman New 52 volume 6 in a trade paperback and a hardcover of Superman Vol 7. I did catch the Starting to make some sense and I applaud DC's efforts to invigorate the Superman legend/character. I have just recently read the New 52 collections of Superman Vols 1 & 2, and now Action Vols 1 & 2. Next up is Superman #3. All from my digital library. Then I will move over to New 52 and the first 3 volumes there. Might have to break down sooner or later and buy some collections. I do have Superman New 52 volume 6 in a trade paperback and a hardcover of Superman Vol 7. I did catch the ending chapters in the New 52 Superman sage a few years ago and I was pretty lost at the time. Now it is making some sense.

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