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The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, Book 2

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This is book 2 of 2. Both books also were combined into a single volume. Book 2 picks up the story following Lisbeth's final confrontation with her "guardian," Nils Bjurman. Harriet Vanger, a scion of one of Sweden's wealthiest families disappeared over forty years ago. All these years later, her aged uncle continues to seek the truth. He hires Mikael Blomkvist, a crusading This is book 2 of 2. Both books also were combined into a single volume. Book 2 picks up the story following Lisbeth's final confrontation with her "guardian," Nils Bjurman. Harriet Vanger, a scion of one of Sweden's wealthiest families disappeared over forty years ago. All these years later, her aged uncle continues to seek the truth. He hires Mikael Blomkvist, a crusading journalist recently trapped by a libel conviction, to investigate. He is aided by the pierced and tattooed punk prodigy Lisbeth Salander. Together they tap into a vein of unfathomable iniquity and astonishing corruption. Written by Denise Mina (John Constantine, Hellblazer) with art by Leonardo Manco and Andrea Mutti


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This is book 2 of 2. Both books also were combined into a single volume. Book 2 picks up the story following Lisbeth's final confrontation with her "guardian," Nils Bjurman. Harriet Vanger, a scion of one of Sweden's wealthiest families disappeared over forty years ago. All these years later, her aged uncle continues to seek the truth. He hires Mikael Blomkvist, a crusading This is book 2 of 2. Both books also were combined into a single volume. Book 2 picks up the story following Lisbeth's final confrontation with her "guardian," Nils Bjurman. Harriet Vanger, a scion of one of Sweden's wealthiest families disappeared over forty years ago. All these years later, her aged uncle continues to seek the truth. He hires Mikael Blomkvist, a crusading journalist recently trapped by a libel conviction, to investigate. He is aided by the pierced and tattooed punk prodigy Lisbeth Salander. Together they tap into a vein of unfathomable iniquity and astonishing corruption. Written by Denise Mina (John Constantine, Hellblazer) with art by Leonardo Manco and Andrea Mutti

30 review for The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, Book 2

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    Guys, I’m begging you. Don’t even bother with this series, whether or not you’ve read the original trilogy. If you’re a fan, it’s just going to piss you off. And if you’re a noob, you’re just going to wonder why everyone is obsessed with this piece of crap story. Denise Mina absolutely ruins her adaptation of Stieg Larsson’s Millennium trilogy, and the worst part is, it seems to have been done on purpose. I read Vol. 1 of this series last year, which adapted the first part of The Girl With the D Guys, I’m begging you. Don’t even bother with this series, whether or not you’ve read the original trilogy. If you’re a fan, it’s just going to piss you off. And if you’re a noob, you’re just going to wonder why everyone is obsessed with this piece of crap story. Denise Mina absolutely ruins her adaptation of Stieg Larsson’s Millennium trilogy, and the worst part is, it seems to have been done on purpose. I read Vol. 1 of this series last year, which adapted the first part of The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo into graphic novel form. I was not impressed. In fact, I was slightly angry and one-starred that fucker. I didn’t think I was going to bother reading Vol. 2, but with my unfortunately OCD completionist nature, and the fact that it popped up on a ‘recently arrived’ shelf at my library, I made the impulse decision to give it a go. MISTAKE. First things first, I completely understand that when adapting a story for a different medium, it’s sometimes (oftentimes) necessary to change, move or truncate things to work in said new medium. I am not opposed to favorite stories of mine being adapted in such a way as long as the person doing the adapting is faithful to the themes, ideas, and characters that make up the original. To use a recent example, the Hunger Games books are favorites of mine, and despite changes and deletions in the first and especially second movies, I love the films as well as the books because they have different things to offer concerning the same story. To use an even more relevant example, David Fincher changed some things up in his film version of The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, but I didn’t mind any of them because the overall feel of the story and characters was more important than individual details. After my first experience with Mina’s adaptation skills, I had charitably decided that she was either shit at adapting things, or was just sort of dumb. I say this was charitable because my opinion of her now is that’s she’s a fecking idiot, and kind of an arrogant asshat to boot. Because it’s not that she’s shit at adapting (although I think that might also still be the case). She deliberately chose to change key aspects of the story and the characters because she didn’t like them. First of all, only a dick agrees to adapt a series that features characters she doesn’t like. Only a dick would see the opportunity to further their own career and “fix” the mistakes of the original text. A rational, less dickish sort of person would have said, hmmm, maybe since I don’t like this book series, I SHOULDN’T FUCKING ADAPT IT. I came to this realization shortly after finishing Vol. 2, when Google informed me that Mina had done a panel at the Edinburgh International Book Festival where she was there, ostensibly to celebrate the release of this book. I say ostensibly, because at least the way that write-up makes it come across, she seems more intersted in elaborating on the flaws of the source material, how she made it better, and I QUOTE claiming that Stieg Larsson would have been “happy” with all the changes she made. Changes, I might add, that involve: Mikael being called ‘Mikey’ (relatively trivial); removing Lisbeth falling in love with Mikael completely, including a scene where she literally tells him, “I’m not going to fuck you anymore because I miss my girlfriend,” and other stuff I can’t even remember because it caused me to rage blackout. But most of it was complete character assassination. CHARACTER ASSASSINATION. That assertion deserved its own paragraph. Mina’s Mikael is a pathetic, uninteresting middle-aged sap who barely has any agency. Granted, his penchant for sleeping with anything that owns a vagina is a problem, but an acknowledged one by the text. But because Mina just doesn’t like him, she completely undercuts him as a serious character and he comes off not only like a womanizer, but a stupid and unkind one at that. Mina’s Lisbeth. UGH. I can’t even type it. Mina’s Lisbeth is a sappy hardcore rocker with hardly any issues at all. As detailed in my previous reviews, Mina softens the fuck out of her character, having her cry, not beating people up she full well kicked the shit out of in the books, and unlike the real Lisbeth, she is almost completely emotionally available. She isn’t Lisbeth Salander at all. And Mina’s dialogue is fucking terrible. To the point where reading it, I was wondering if Mina had ever met an actual human being. The way her characters talk, she must associate only with robots, and not even the cool kind. This is probably one of those reviews that shouldn’t have been written. It’s very unprofessional. It’s a full-on rant. If Denise Mina ever reads it, she will probably be insulted. I feel bad about that potential outcome, but at the same time, she showed so very little respect for the material she was adapting here that a respectful review didn’t feel like the way to go. Instead I went the way of the real Lisbeth. Like, fuck it. I wanna light this shit on fire.

  2. 4 out of 5

    م. الماجد

    The story is good of having two killers but it is not well built. the way it was found out were weak

  3. 4 out of 5

    Licha

    Should only be read if the novel was read. It would be hard to compress so much of the story into a graphic novel format so I can overlook a lot of the flaws but for a brand new reader to this series, I would definitely start with the books. It's been a couple of years since I read this book, but I don't remember the novel ending the way it was portrayed in the graphic version. That should not have happened.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    It was okie. There was a lot of jumping that wouldn't make sense if you hadn't already read the original Stieg Larsson book. There were times when I didn't even follow.... wait.. what happened..? Don't read this book to replace the original. You'll just be confused, which is such a shame since book one was so amazeballs. Full review to come... maybe..

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sleeping with Ghosts

    Well, it's nice to read this kind of cómic, they illustrated better than the book some scenes, but in the book you can imagine all. Still was an amazing art, no quite so well than other works, but I like it. Some scenes are for mature public, 18+. High-voltage scene, sex (mature) and violence (Lisbeth hit some bad ass guys). She is stronger as female character.

  6. 5 out of 5

    mad mags

    A bit of a letdown for old fans. (Trigger warning for discussions of rape.) The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, Book 2 is the second and final volume of the comic book adaptation of Stieg Larsson's The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. I won't rehash the book's plot here, except to say that it's equal parts murder mystery, rape revenge, and social commentary. Wealthy industrialist Henrik Vanger hires disgraced journalist Mikael Blomkvist to solve a decades-old mystery: the disappearance of his niece Harri A bit of a letdown for old fans. (Trigger warning for discussions of rape.) The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, Book 2 is the second and final volume of the comic book adaptation of Stieg Larsson's The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. I won't rehash the book's plot here, except to say that it's equal parts murder mystery, rape revenge, and social commentary. Wealthy industrialist Henrik Vanger hires disgraced journalist Mikael Blomkvist to solve a decades-old mystery: the disappearance of his niece Harriet from the family's isolated estate on Hedeby Island. Meanwhile, a young woman named Lisbeth Salander - the eponymous "girl with the dragon tattoo" - is struggling to deal with her new court-appointed guardian, Nils Bjurman, a "sadistic pig, a pervert, and a rapist." Lisbeth and Blomkvist's paths converge when Vanger hires Lisbeth's employer, Milton Security, to dig into Blomkvist's life. The problems I had with the first volume carry over to the second one as well. In her attempt to boil a long and complicated story down to a more terse comic book format, the changes introduced by Mina often distort a character's personality and motivations - or alter specific scenes and plot lines - in fundamental ways. For example, Lisbeth doesn't join Blomkvist's investigation until after he and Pernilla decode the mysterious strings of numbers found in Harriet's notebook...thus uncovering a prolific serial killer (or team of them) that's been hunting down "sinful" women for decades. As a result, Lisbeth's contribution to cracking the case is diminished significantly; her awesome talents almost seem inconsequential here. Exhibit B: When Blomkvist is attacked and kidnapped by the serial killer, he's trussed up and suspended from the ceiling with an elaborate rope and collar getup: arms stretched tight above him, wrists tied to the ceiling, with a rope securing his ankles behind his back "hog style." While there is a rope around his neck, it's more of a leash - not a noose, like in the book. While no doubt painfully uncomfortable, Blomkvist is in no immediate danger of expiring. Thus, when Lisbeth comes to the rescue, she's not presented with the Sophie's choice of saving Blomkvist from death by strangulation or pursuing the serial killer (though she unties him first anyway). This climactic scene lacks much of the tension and suspense present in the original. If you haven't read the books, the comic book adaptation is an interesting enough story. But longtime fans like myself are likely to be disappointed by the many changes and inconsistencies. That said, I haven't cancelled my pre-order of The Girl Who Played With Fire, Book 1; I'm still holding out hope that Mina will have better luck with another book. Fingers, crossed. http://www.easyvegan.info/2013/12/27/...

  7. 4 out of 5

    Paul Nelson

    The second volume of The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo is better than the first and to be honest it really had to be, after being completely unimpressed with volume one. My review of volume one. http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/... The artwork for one was a big issue for me, done by two artists Leonardo Manco and Andrea Mutti there was a severe lack of consistency regarding the two main characters Lisbeth Salander and Mikael Blomkvist, they actually looked different from one page to the next. T The second volume of The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo is better than the first and to be honest it really had to be, after being completely unimpressed with volume one. My review of volume one. http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/... The artwork for one was a big issue for me, done by two artists Leonardo Manco and Andrea Mutti there was a severe lack of consistency regarding the two main characters Lisbeth Salander and Mikael Blomkvist, they actually looked different from one page to the next. This ruined the coherency and it did actually annoy me. The plot was another bone of contention for me, obviously the writer cannot include everything from the book it would be just to much for a graphic novel but there were significant changes from the source material enough so that I recognised them instantly and you are then left thinking can't believe they've done that, why!. There are some glaring omissions which I think would have bonded the story together better but I guess you can't have everything. On a positive note the tension builds rapidly and it goes from the first break through to the reveal of the serial killer almost in the blink of an eye forcing me to complete the novel in one sitting. If you are a diehard fan then this adaptation will annoy with its artistry and subtle plot differences, subtle like with a sledge hammer. If you are new to the franchise then chances are you will enjoy it, personally I've read alot of different reviews for this and alot of people love it but its one of those that you will either love or hate and I think I'm bending toward the latter.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    Amazingly enough, Denise Mina manages to capture this story in so few pages. This second volume of the adaptation is just as beautifully presented as the first. I still haven't read the original book (boo! moi!), and I don't even know wether I'll ever get that much of a "need" to read it, but I am glad I have read this adaptation and seen the American Movie version... in fact, now I'm more curious to see the Swedish(?) movie than I am about reading the actual book. Still, I am looking forward to re Amazingly enough, Denise Mina manages to capture this story in so few pages. This second volume of the adaptation is just as beautifully presented as the first. I still haven't read the original book (boo! moi!), and I don't even know wether I'll ever get that much of a "need" to read it, but I am glad I have read this adaptation and seen the American Movie version... in fact, now I'm more curious to see the Swedish(?) movie than I am about reading the actual book. Still, I am looking forward to reading Mina's adaptation of the sequel(s) as well.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mersini

    So I really enjoyed this volume. Of course, in the translation from book to graphic novel, some things are lost, and pacing is a bit off, but overall, I thought it was really well done. The art is fantastic and you get a sense of the novel from the graphic novel, even if it isn't a word for word adaptation. I really enjoyed that there were entire pages without dialogue, though it could be difficult to follow, especially in a medium where dialogue is the forefront of the story telling. But I thin So I really enjoyed this volume. Of course, in the translation from book to graphic novel, some things are lost, and pacing is a bit off, but overall, I thought it was really well done. The art is fantastic and you get a sense of the novel from the graphic novel, even if it isn't a word for word adaptation. I really enjoyed that there were entire pages without dialogue, though it could be difficult to follow, especially in a medium where dialogue is the forefront of the story telling. But I think it was really well done.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Francis

    Part 2 of the graphic novel representation of Stieg Larsson's book. I enjoyed the comparison between the original novel, graphic novel, and movies. Although the graphic novel is my least favourite representation, it still did justice to the book. I would only recommend it if you have previously read the original book, as parts are tougher to follow.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    So glad I read the book (& saw the move - both of them) before reading this because I would have remained 100% lost and wondering how this was a best seller had I read this first! Poor transitions, weak plotting, WAY too much plot line left out. The art registers in at about a B-. So glad I read the book (& saw the move - both of them) before reading this because I would have remained 100% lost and wondering how this was a best seller had I read this first! Poor transitions, weak plotting, WAY too much plot line left out. The art registers in at about a B-.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kelley Tackett

    The art in this book is amazing and thank goodness they stuck to the ending in the book, unlike the American version of the movie. I can't wait for The Girl Who Played with Fire.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dionisia

    These graphic novel adaptations just don't have the same punching power as the novels. Meh.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Damera Blincoe

    Really good read. I think I'm hooked on graphics now.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kelley

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. My same issues with the first volume were here in the second volume. So I won't repeat here. One new thing I found annoying was how everyone called Mikael "Mikey" in this book. I think Erika did in the books maybe, but definitely not Lisbeth. I'm not sure if it was an attempt to Americanize "Mikke" but either way, it was hella annoying. Also I have to check my facts on this, but I noticed particularly in the end torture scene that took place that it was like shot for shot from David Fincher's mo My same issues with the first volume were here in the second volume. So I won't repeat here. One new thing I found annoying was how everyone called Mikael "Mikey" in this book. I think Erika did in the books maybe, but definitely not Lisbeth. I'm not sure if it was an attempt to Americanize "Mikke" but either way, it was hella annoying. Also I have to check my facts on this, but I noticed particularly in the end torture scene that took place that it was like shot for shot from David Fincher's movie adaptation. Though I can't say I mind the resemblance of Daniel Craig in comic book form, as he is a beautiful man both on screen and on paper. I'm also wondering if that will explain my issues with the dialogue as well. They called Mikael "Mikey" every 30 seconds, but no mention of Kalle Blomkvist?! I'll be watching the movie (and yes probably rereading the novel and watching the Swedish version to compare notes), because I suspect that this graphic novel was influenced heavily by David Fincher's film which came out in 2011, just a few years before this came out. An adaptation which I liked because of David Fincher's style and casting choices, but not necessarily because of loyalty to the book. I will say the one redeeming quality I liked is how it became about women's empowerment. I don't remember Mikael taking Harriet's picture to her in the book and burning it, so that was a nice touch of closure for her. Will come back to compare notes later!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jai

    This was the second part of book one and I'm even more impressed by it. I watched the movie awhile back but of course this book gives way more detail surrounding so many of the events as well as Mikael's and Lisbeth's life. What started off as just a mystery surround a missing person turned into so much more....corruption, murder, lies and family secrets. The movie really gave it no justice! I want to give a special shout out to the author for portraying Lisbeth's sexuality as just that..her sex This was the second part of book one and I'm even more impressed by it. I watched the movie awhile back but of course this book gives way more detail surrounding so many of the events as well as Mikael's and Lisbeth's life. What started off as just a mystery surround a missing person turned into so much more....corruption, murder, lies and family secrets. The movie really gave it no justice! I want to give a special shout out to the author for portraying Lisbeth's sexuality as just that..her sexuality. She's not fetishized and her relationship with her girlfriend is just that, a relationship. I can't wait to read the remaining books in the series.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Cecilia

    It was okay. I couldn't get through even a chapter of the novel. Too many names at once. Having the visual and simplified story helped a lot. It still wasn't to my tastes.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ronnie

    very weirddd, like crazy and did not know about some pictures.. but it was all good and recommend for mature people. haha

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lillian

    Great artwork

  20. 4 out of 5

    Duncan

    Loved it!

  21. 5 out of 5

    M.A. Stern

    This two part graphic novel is my main exposure to the work, so I am judging the story as a whole rather than adaptation quality. The story is full of interesting plot twists and great buildup.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Abigail

    I really enjoyed it, now I want to read the book📖😊

  23. 4 out of 5

    Helen Leigh-Phippard

    Better than volume 1 is all I really want to say. Read Stieg Larsson’s books, watch the film, don’t bother with these.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lenny Burnham

    I don't think the conversion to graphic novel really worked. This had some entertaining parts but the overall story felt thin and extremely rushed.

  25. 4 out of 5

    bet mercer

    (more 3.5)

  26. 4 out of 5

    Gally

    2 stars For the record, I own the entire Millennium book trilogy and the Swedish movie trilogy. It's one of my favorite series and Lisbeth is hands down an all-time favorite character. My review treats this graphic novel as an adaptation of an original work, not an original or stand-alone work because that's not what it is. That being said, while I do enjoy quite a few graphic novels, I don't usually read comic versions of books because I find them lacking in content and not close enough to the or 2 stars For the record, I own the entire Millennium book trilogy and the Swedish movie trilogy. It's one of my favorite series and Lisbeth is hands down an all-time favorite character. My review treats this graphic novel as an adaptation of an original work, not an original or stand-alone work because that's not what it is. That being said, while I do enjoy quite a few graphic novels, I don't usually read comic versions of books because I find them lacking in content and not close enough to the original -- even more than some movie adaptations -- so they become more like condensed, spin-offs to me. I picked this up because of the badass cover art and the first few pages seemed accurate to the book. Unfortunately, it left me pretty disappointed for the above reasons and I will be returning this. This definitely does not deserve the 4- and 5-star ratings people who haven't read the books or even seen the movies have been giving it. I don't want to make this a long review since there are others out there who've already expressed the same opinions, so in a nutshell, this got 2 stars because: The character of Lisbeth was portrayed as more frail and emotional than she is in the book. She does not go dancing and she does not cry. Too many panels looked the same, like they were copied, pasted, and zoomed in even though I can tell they weren't. I actually went back to previous pages to make sure I wasn't looking at the same illustration on a different background. The art actually becomes lazy after a while. It just gets flat and less detailed as if they decided to stop shading, especially the parts with Mikael. If you're drawn in by the cover, don't expect the inside to be the same. The character's mouths aren't open when they're talking. This may seem like a minor detail, but I feel like the most basic thing an illustrator should know is to make the characters look animated, not like statues. People are just sitting there while speech bubbles are floating around them. If it weren't for the speech bubbles pointing to the tight-lipped character who's supposed to be talking, you wouldn't know whom the words belong to. Finally, too many details are just not accurate, such as the tattoo Lisbeth cuts into Bjurman. If you want a visual adaptation of the Millennium trilogy, try the Swedish films; they're accurate to the book minus a few minor details, and I personally think Noomi Rapace portrays Lisbeth flawlessly, right down to her small height, muscular build, punk hair, and icy, take-no-prisoners attitude.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    This review was originally posted on my book review blog, The Overstuffed Bookcase. *This is a review of The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo graphic novels #1.1 and #1.2.* I enjoyed these adaptations of Stieg Larsson's novel, The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, but I didn't write too many notes down as I was reading them. So I'm just going to make this a mini review and share some of my notes with you: -I really like the artwork, especially the covers. -Gotta love men telling women they don't eat enough. A This review was originally posted on my book review blog, The Overstuffed Bookcase. *This is a review of The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo graphic novels #1.1 and #1.2.* I enjoyed these adaptations of Stieg Larsson's novel, The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, but I didn't write too many notes down as I was reading them. So I'm just going to make this a mini review and share some of my notes with you: -I really like the artwork, especially the covers. -Gotta love men telling women they don't eat enough. And this was a pretty good character, too! (In #1.1) -The parts with Lisbeth and her evil guardian are SO HORRIBLE, no matter if I'm reading them in the original book, or watching the scenes in the movies, or reading these graphic novels. -I really like how it shows how haunted Lisbeth is after certain events. (I won't go into it because spoilers.) -It is NOT a good idea to read these graphic novels (or the original books, either) at night when everyone else in your house is asleep. I was so creeped out! -The panels in both volumes were kind of hard to read at times, because of the placement of the speech bubbles. I would read one person's dialogue first, when I was supposed to read the other person's first. It was just kind of confusing. My rating for The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo graphic novels #1.1 and #1.2: 3.5 stars each. I thought the artwork was great, and they followed the story quite well, but I didn't love them and the panels were hard to read at times. Disclaimer: I borrowed copies of these books from my library. I was in no way compensated for this review.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Scheibe

    I received this book through the Goodreads First Reads program. The second volume of Mina, Manco, and Mutti’s adaptation of the late Stieg Larsson’s The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo is, for the most part, well done. My biggest gripe with the book is the time jumps employed throughout. While I am (unfortunately) not familiar with the original books (though they are on my shelf and on my to-read list), I get the feeling that these jumps were directly inspired by how the books were written. As a devic I received this book through the Goodreads First Reads program. The second volume of Mina, Manco, and Mutti’s adaptation of the late Stieg Larsson’s The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo is, for the most part, well done. My biggest gripe with the book is the time jumps employed throughout. While I am (unfortunately) not familiar with the original books (though they are on my shelf and on my to-read list), I get the feeling that these jumps were directly inspired by how the books were written. As a device in a novel, these work better than in a graphic novel, especially as there is no delineation between the different times in the latter; in a novel, paragraphs are a quick and easy guide. I found myself turning back pages numerous times in order to determine whether they had stuck together or whether I had missed something important. These jumps were rather jarring, I must admit, and detracted from my overall enjoyment. The art style works very well with the story; the jagged lines and alternation of heavy shadows and bright colors make the art really pop. While the harshness of some of the lines and angles may be a tad harsh to look at at first, they really contribute a lot to the feel of the book as a whole. And let me just say that the cover art is some of the most gorgeous art I’ve seen in a while. Props to Lee Bermejo on another beautiful piece. Overall, I enjoyed the book. The art style meshes well with the story (and seems to improve as it goes on), and I hope to read future installments in the series.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Decca

    The story was well laid/developed in the first graphic novel; I was truly expecting a spectacular conclusion. I was very disappointed with the story telling in this graphic novel. The art was good but the story was confusing and rushed for a conclusion. I feel like there were substantial gaps in the information regarding how the killer was captured. I have not read the original book series or watched the movie. I am choosing to believe that this lack of information was something lost in transla The story was well laid/developed in the first graphic novel; I was truly expecting a spectacular conclusion. I was very disappointed with the story telling in this graphic novel. The art was good but the story was confusing and rushed for a conclusion. I feel like there were substantial gaps in the information regarding how the killer was captured. I have not read the original book series or watched the movie. I am choosing to believe that this lack of information was something lost in translation by the adapter of this graphic novel and not by the original author. I have been noticing a disturbing trend in graphic novels that are adaptations of well received, (money making), books, movies or television series. The trend seems to be slap something together so the adapter and/or publisher can ride the wave of popularity before the fan base is lost. This seems like a case of this disturbingly, lackluster trend. I feel very grateful that I borrowed this from the library and did not buy this myself. I am giving this book 2 stars only because I can see the potential for a spectacular story. I intend on reading the original series because the storyline is creative and interesting. I would not suggest this to people who have not read the original series.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Chella

    As much as I love the Girl with the Dragon Tattoo books... I simply did not like this. But, perhaps it is BECAUSE I liked the books that I had problems with this adaptation. I have only two real problems, but they are inherent flaws in the story and cannot be excused. First off, I am aware that different artists contribute to the making of a graphic novel, and that there will be differences in character appearance occasionally, but these images are just confusing. The characters would change app As much as I love the Girl with the Dragon Tattoo books... I simply did not like this. But, perhaps it is BECAUSE I liked the books that I had problems with this adaptation. I have only two real problems, but they are inherent flaws in the story and cannot be excused. First off, I am aware that different artists contribute to the making of a graphic novel, and that there will be differences in character appearance occasionally, but these images are just confusing. The characters would change appearance from one scene to the next- so much so, that I had problems distinguishing who was who. And secondly, there is the problem of the characters themselves. The characters are not portrayed accurately-particularly Lisbeth. There are several moments (such as the altering of her appearance to be more socially acceptable or her dismissive take on her relationship with Mikael) that seem wrong on so many levels, and very different from the original story. Sure, the plot progresses more or less the same, but it is very different characters from the original ones that are leading it.

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