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The Norton Anthology of Modern Poetry

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Works by American and British writers illuminate the development of modern poetry.


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Works by American and British writers illuminate the development of modern poetry.

30 review for The Norton Anthology of Modern Poetry

  1. 5 out of 5

    Charles Bechtel

    Welcome to the graveyard of forgotten poets. About half of these poets have been obliterated from discussions, another third hangs on as historically important, and about 20% heralded as Ist-icons of other some -Ism. Although Norton has selected a number of the most topical and respected poets of the early twentieth century, and some late twentieth, the book is only worth having because it has so many poems in it. If you like poetry, own a Norton. By the way, nobody "reads" this book. They wend t Welcome to the graveyard of forgotten poets. About half of these poets have been obliterated from discussions, another third hangs on as historically important, and about 20% heralded as Ist-icons of other some -Ism. Although Norton has selected a number of the most topical and respected poets of the early twentieth century, and some late twentieth, the book is only worth having because it has so many poems in it. If you like poetry, own a Norton. By the way, nobody "reads" this book. They wend through it, and often at various times and in various ways.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Robyn

    This sucker helped me breeze through the modernist stuff on the lit test. It's got enough biographical info and info about how critics classify the poets to help you remember the difference between similar dudes (and dudettes), and most of the poems are exemplary of their styles. A great primer, and a great book to have if you don't plan on buying volumes and volumes of modernist poems!

  3. 4 out of 5

    J. Boo

    Spent a significant amount of time with this for 12th grade English. I was a fast and compulsive reader, so I wound up reading most, if not all of the collection. Includes some of the limited amount of decent stuff written in the twentieth century, and oodles of awful, pretentious dreck. You know the sort. A bunch of prose, sometimes (ill-times) poorly written and with numerous linebreaks else lines that go on and on and on and on and on and on fore/ever For reasons difficult to discern. This un-ness of Spent a significant amount of time with this for 12th grade English. I was a fast and compulsive reader, so I wound up reading most, if not all of the collection. Includes some of the limited amount of decent stuff written in the twentieth century, and oodles of awful, pretentious dreck. You know the sort. A bunch of prose, sometimes (ill-times) poorly written and with numerous linebreaks else lines that go on and on and on and on and on and on fore/ever For reasons difficult to discern. This un-ness of discernation is the beauty (of course! the beauty!) Many (so many) PhDs can have dissertations piled higher and deeper explicating this dross. (PS Sex needs to be here somewhere so here it is.) Anyway, I found it enjoyable in the train wreck sense and I did appreciate the mini-biographies of the (alleged) poets. Plonked down a quarter a year or two later to get it at a library sale. I do wonder what my reaction would be today. C.S. Lewis, who didn't like modern poetry, nevertheless made a rather profound defense of it, even as he sketched out a possible future where poetry itself would wither away from everywhere but the curriculum. This future seems even closer today.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Gary McDowell

    Right now (9/11/07), it's Whitman, Dickinson, and the intro. Soon it'll be Eliot, Pound, Stevens, Williams, etc. Now (9/13/07) it's time for 55 pages of micro-sized print William Butler Yeats. Oh boy.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    i love anthologies, am a collector of them. i purchased this one used for my poetry courses at U of Ottawa about 12 years ago & i return to it often. this summer i've decided to revisit the dead, so this is a perfect book for such. Sweet, sweet, sweet, sweet, sweet tea, Susie Assado... i love anthologies, am a collector of them. i purchased this one used for my poetry courses at U of Ottawa about 12 years ago & i return to it often. this summer i've decided to revisit the dead, so this is a perfect book for such. Sweet, sweet, sweet, sweet, sweet tea, Susie Assado...

  6. 5 out of 5

    J. Alfred

    Can we all just agree that anthologies are helpful things to have on one's shelf, but ultimately unsatisfying? They never go in-depth enough on the authors one likes, and seem to stretch out forever on authors one wants nothing to do with. Oh well: they're also great introducers of authors one didn't know (or know well enough) before. The guys on this list that I met in this book include Brother Antoninus, Sigfreid Sassoon, Marianne Moore, Denise Levertov, WH Auden, and Delmore Schwartz. Also, e Can we all just agree that anthologies are helpful things to have on one's shelf, but ultimately unsatisfying? They never go in-depth enough on the authors one likes, and seem to stretch out forever on authors one wants nothing to do with. Oh well: they're also great introducers of authors one didn't know (or know well enough) before. The guys on this list that I met in this book include Brother Antoninus, Sigfreid Sassoon, Marianne Moore, Denise Levertov, WH Auden, and Delmore Schwartz. Also, everyone needs to read more Pound, Cummings, and WC Williams. In that order.

  7. 4 out of 5

    carl theaker

    Had to purchase for, what else? Modern poetry class, and glad I did, kept after college. Have read through this and that passage many times, a great book to keep at the bedside, pick a poet fer an eve, after dark and before the dawn surprises you.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Philip

    I may never actually finish this book as it's an anthology, I pick it up every once in a while to re-read favorite poems that are included and new ones I haven't encountered yet. This is an outstanding collection.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sana

    Love the Walt Whitman poems.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    This is a bookshelf basic as far as I'm concerned.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Cage

    Awesome awesome selection. Cannot rate it highly enough.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ian

    Just open anywhere and learn something!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Foxygiraffe

    Ok, obviously I haven't read the WHOLE thing, but it's on my shelf.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Erin Riggio

    Oh, Norton, how I love thee. These anthologies are awesome--both for the great works they include and for the interesting information about authors.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Dave H

    Norton, Norton, pudding and pie.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    currently reading, ad infinitum. ask joe sacksteader

  17. 4 out of 5

    Spike Gomes

    Well, it certain *is* the completest, for 1989 anyways. The collection starts with Whitman and Dickinson and ends with a collection of really forgettable stuff from a bunch of people who got MFAs in creative writing in the 70s and 80s. Along the way, depending on how one views it, one can see either the declining public profile of written poetry over the 20th century, or the rise of diverse voices (who all happen to teach English at a college or university and write mostly in free verse or struct Well, it certain *is* the completest, for 1989 anyways. The collection starts with Whitman and Dickinson and ends with a collection of really forgettable stuff from a bunch of people who got MFAs in creative writing in the 70s and 80s. Along the way, depending on how one views it, one can see either the declining public profile of written poetry over the 20th century, or the rise of diverse voices (who all happen to teach English at a college or university and write mostly in free verse or structures of their own devising). It's fairly sad. Not *all* contemporary poetry is horrible. I'm hardly one of those people who think that the last poet in the English language of any worth was Hardy or Frost. But honestly, most of it is cryptic unaesthetic navel-gazing that no one outside of an English department would read with any sense of pleasure, pay money to own a volume or hear spoken by the writer. Certainly one of the benefits of this collection is finding some of the few contemporary poets one actually likes. With nearly 2,000 pages it would be hard not to. That said, it's tough to go from such well known poets and influential figures in the course of national history and culture like Yeats and Pound, to counterculture figures of great import... to an endless roll call of English professors who at times can conjure up evocative images or thought provoking lines, but are utterly forgettable and cookie-cutter in their personas, aesthetics and social values, whether they be as differing in origin as a gay black man or Native American woman or English Jew. All in all, I think it's a bit too late to rescue poetry from its current state of cultural irrelevance. Heck, it was already a couple decades too late even in 1989. I think there are other more technologically current mediums that fill that emotional and aesthetic niche for the masses. It will always have its place in history, and there will still be practitioners of the craft. What I most fondly hope for, is for the rescue of the form from its current academic ghetto and back to an artform practiced by aristocrats, revolutionaries, soldiers, longshoremen, doctors, insurance executives and unemployed junkies without any hope or desire of gaining a sinecure through it.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sierra

    I did not read this cover to cover but probably read the biographical information and all the selected works for about 1/3 of the authors (about 450 pages of poetry). Read from Hardy, Frost, and Yeats to Auden, Crane, and Thomas. I will list the authors later along with a star for my favorite authors & styles (from what I can remember.) Read this for Modern Poetry class Jan-June 2018 I did not read this cover to cover but probably read the biographical information and all the selected works for about 1/3 of the authors (about 450 pages of poetry). Read from Hardy, Frost, and Yeats to Auden, Crane, and Thomas. I will list the authors later along with a star for my favorite authors & styles (from what I can remember.) Read this for Modern Poetry class Jan-June 2018

  19. 4 out of 5

    James Finch

    Very useful

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lynda

    Okay, truth be told I do not like much modern poetry. A few years ago after on of my long recoveries from surgery, I went through this anthology to see if any poets appealed to me that I might want to read further. There were a few, also a few I liked a lot, but I still like the older poets better.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nice

    This is a book for your library that you constantly refer back to, that helps introduce you to some of the greatest poet living and dead. I am so thankful my Poetry Writing Prof made us buy this. Shoutout to John Matthias at the University of Notre Dame. I will always be currently reading this book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Derek H

    Eew.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Shel

    Bought it in college, still the best one anthology I've got -- and written all over!

  24. 4 out of 5

    William

    A fantastic collection of poems. Very expansive.

  25. 4 out of 5

    M James Beard

  26. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne Arcand

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ginger Hamilton

  28. 4 out of 5

    Anthony A

  29. 4 out of 5

    Leetta Angel

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sofia Khan

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