kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

The Nazis Next Door: How America Became a Safe Haven for Hitler's Men

Availability: Ready to download

The shocking story of how America became one of the world’s safest postwar havens for Nazis Thousands of Nazis — from concentration camp guards to high-level officers in the Third Reich — came to the United States after World War II and quietly settled into new lives. They had little trouble getting in. With scant scrutiny, many gained entry on their own as self-styled war The shocking story of how America became one of the world’s safest postwar havens for Nazis Thousands of Nazis — from concentration camp guards to high-level officers in the Third Reich — came to the United States after World War II and quietly settled into new lives. They had little trouble getting in. With scant scrutiny, many gained entry on their own as self-styled war "refugees," their pasts easily disguised and their war crimes soon forgotten. But some had help and protection from the U.S. government. The CIA, the FBI, and the military all put Hitler's minions to work as spies, intelligence assets, and leading scientists and engineers, whitewashing their histories. For the first time, once-secret government records and interviews tell the full story not only of the Nazi scientists brought to America, but of the German spies and con men who followed them and lived for decades as ordinary citizens. Only years after their arrival did private sleuths and government prosecutors begin trying to identify the hidden Nazis. But even then, American intelligence agencies secretly worked to protect a number of their prized spies from exposure. Today, a few Nazis still remain on our soil. Investigative reporter Eric Lichtblau, relying on a trove of newly discovered documents and scores of interviews with participants in this little-known chapter of postwar history, tells the shocking and shameful story of how America became a safe haven for Hitler's men.


Compare
kode adsense disini

The shocking story of how America became one of the world’s safest postwar havens for Nazis Thousands of Nazis — from concentration camp guards to high-level officers in the Third Reich — came to the United States after World War II and quietly settled into new lives. They had little trouble getting in. With scant scrutiny, many gained entry on their own as self-styled war The shocking story of how America became one of the world’s safest postwar havens for Nazis Thousands of Nazis — from concentration camp guards to high-level officers in the Third Reich — came to the United States after World War II and quietly settled into new lives. They had little trouble getting in. With scant scrutiny, many gained entry on their own as self-styled war "refugees," their pasts easily disguised and their war crimes soon forgotten. But some had help and protection from the U.S. government. The CIA, the FBI, and the military all put Hitler's minions to work as spies, intelligence assets, and leading scientists and engineers, whitewashing their histories. For the first time, once-secret government records and interviews tell the full story not only of the Nazi scientists brought to America, but of the German spies and con men who followed them and lived for decades as ordinary citizens. Only years after their arrival did private sleuths and government prosecutors begin trying to identify the hidden Nazis. But even then, American intelligence agencies secretly worked to protect a number of their prized spies from exposure. Today, a few Nazis still remain on our soil. Investigative reporter Eric Lichtblau, relying on a trove of newly discovered documents and scores of interviews with participants in this little-known chapter of postwar history, tells the shocking and shameful story of how America became a safe haven for Hitler's men.

30 review for The Nazis Next Door: How America Became a Safe Haven for Hitler's Men

  1. 5 out of 5

    sappho_reader

    "Didn't these people get it? This was a war. You did what you had to do to survive" Tscherim Soobzokov, ex-CIA spy residing in New Jersey Accused of collaborating with the Nazi SS during the invasion of USSR Shocking. If I wasn't already aware of some of this material I would have had a difficult time accepting it. My cub scout image of the U.S Government is continually shattered. Persistent antisemitism within Washington and the U.S. military during and after WW2 resulted in the further disgrace o "Didn't these people get it? This was a war. You did what you had to do to survive" Tscherim Soobzokov, ex-CIA spy residing in New Jersey Accused of collaborating with the Nazi SS during the invasion of USSR Shocking. If I wasn't already aware of some of this material I would have had a difficult time accepting it. My cub scout image of the U.S Government is continually shattered. Persistent antisemitism within Washington and the U.S. military during and after WW2 resulted in the further disgrace of the Jews by leaving them in the camps they were supposedly "liberated" from and denied immigration to the United States. What is more disturbing is that while the Jews had nowhere to go the U.S Government actively recruited 1600 ex-Nazi's into the United States in an effort to combat Russia in the new Cold War via "Operation Paperclip". Didn't take long for many of them to assimilate in America and downplay their involvement in the Holocaust. I always wonder how they can live with their conscious knowing what they did during the war, and how others can defend them.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    This symbol invokes such visceral indignation, disdain and disgust in me. It is the symbol of such egregious inhumane acts of hate and human suffering, unfathomable cruelty, a symbol of state sponsored genocide. [image error] Our political leaders embraced many of the demons who stood behind this symbol in WWII after the fall of the Third Reich! This book was so eye opening and infuriating but so typical of Machiavellian political pragmatism. I can only imagine WWII vets rolling in their graves ove This symbol invokes such visceral indignation, disdain and disgust in me. It is the symbol of such egregious inhumane acts of hate and human suffering, unfathomable cruelty, a symbol of state sponsored genocide. [image error] Our political leaders embraced many of the demons who stood behind this symbol in WWII after the fall of the Third Reich! This book was so eye opening and infuriating but so typical of Machiavellian political pragmatism. I can only imagine WWII vets rolling in their graves over how the U.S. State Department embraced former Nazi war criminals to gain an upper hand in the Cold War with the Soviets. Before reading The Nazis Next Door I was vaguely aware of our cooperation with former Third Reich scientists and engineers and even Nazi doctors responsible for gruesome medical experiments on concentration camp prisoners but the extent of the complicity described and documented in this book is outrageous and morally exasperating. [image error] In November 28, 1941 in Vilnius, Lithuania, Gritta Kaplan and her 6 year old daughter Fruma were imprisoned in cell #17 at the notorious Vilnius Hard Labor Prison by order of Nazi collaborator Aleksandra Lileikis, chief of the security police in Vilnius. Their crime? Fleeing the Jewish ghetto and hiding at a nearby home of a Catholic family that tried to protect and conceal them. Three weeks later, Gritta and Fruma were marched to an excavation pit six miles outside of town in a wooded hamlet called Ponary, lined up at the pit’s edge and machine gunned to death along with at least 55,000 of the 60,000 Jewish men, women and children of Vilnius. [image error] Nearly 10 years later in 1952, fully aware of Lileikis’ heinous crimes against humanity in Lithuania and the unanimous rejection of his entry into the United Sates two years earlier because “he was under control of the Gestapo”, the CIA recruited him in Munich to spy on the Communists in East Germany. At the time the United States was aggressively recruiting former Nazis en masse in Europe to gather intelligence on the new world threat – communist domination by the Soviet Union. After working for the CIA for several years in Europe, Lileikis hoped his loyalty to the CIA would gain him entry into the United States. It did! The CIA whitewashed his war time records and in 1955 Lileikis successfully immigrated to America, settling in central Massachusetts. The more I researched some of the history behind this book, the more my stomach roiled with disgust and dismay. How can people do this to one another? How could our nation embrace the beasts of National Socialism? And so it went. Lileikis was just one of thousands of former Nazi war criminals allowed to settle in the USA with the help of the State Department, CIA and FBI to aid in the Cold War and international fight against the spread of Communism. After all, no one hated the Soviets more than the Nazis, went the official view of the United States at the time. They would be loyal. By late 1944 and early 1945, it became clear to all that WWII was coming to a close, the Nazis would be defeated and the next world war would be a Cold War against Soviet style communism. US diplomatic operatives in Europe reached out to key Nazi leaders and field commanders to enlist their support to gather intelligence about the communists in East Germany and their Soviet supporters. With fervent anti-Communism zeal cloaked in a thin veil of anti-Semitism, the Vatican (yes, the Catholic Church…amazing!) funneled former Nazis safely out of Europe through the “rat line” in Italy while the Unites States initiated the Operation Paperclip program whereby over 1,500 former Nazi scientists, technicians, engineers and doctors were brought to the United States to deny German scientific knowledge and expertise to the Soviet Union and assist American efforts to expand the US space program and military capabilities. The Joint Intelligence Objectives Agency created false employment histories and political biographies for the Nazi immigrants, bleaching their records of any Nazi Party memberships or affiliations. Their new political persona was "paper clipped" to personnel files and an upstanding, law abiding US citizen emerged! Wernher von Braun was considered the “Godfather of Rocket Science” and served as a director at NASA and chief architect of the Saturn V rocket program. During the war he was a member of the Nazi Allgemeine SS and worked slave labor to death at Peenemuende while developing the Nazi V-2 rocket program that rained down on London in 1944. Imagine - our highly successful Apollo space program was built with the scientific expertise of a Nazi war criminal! Hubertus Strughold, considered the “Father of Space Medicine” for his pioneering role in the study of the physical and psychological effects of manned spaceflight, was recruited for the US Air Force School of Aviation Medicine to study the effects of manned space travel. During WWII he gained his knowledge and expertise through gruesome medical experiments on prisoners of the Dauchu concentration camp. These are just two examples of the thousands of former war criminals the Unites States welcomed to America to beat back the Soviet threat. While the CIA and FBI pushed back extremely hard against international Nazi hunters and even their own Justice Department when questions and investigations arose about the backgrounds of these people, eventually several of these notorious war criminals had their US citizenship revoked and were deported to Germany or Israel. However, the majority lived out their days in peace and tranquility in America. The book highlights some very dark days in our nation’s history and calls into question the morality and righteousness of our political leaders. Without condoning any of these actions, I attempted to view this scenario within the historical context of the times. The fear of world domination by the USSR was very real and intense. Growing up in the 1960s I remember the intense anti-Communist fervor of the nation. The Soviets professed a policy of complete annihilation of the United States and it seems our leaders truly believed a deal with the devil himself was acceptable and justifiable if the result was the defeat of the Soviet Union. Despite the real or perceived Soviet threat, it seems unconscionable to harbor such evil. I walk away from this read with the sense that more often than not our national leadership overlooks the moral high ground that America was built upon for the immediacy of the political pragmatism of Niccolò Machiavelli. Abu Ghraib and waterboarding come to mind as the latest examples of this “ends justifying the means” mentality. Is it necessary to resort to extreme and morally reprehensible actions to protect our democracy? Perhaps only time and history will tell.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ionia

    This book is well deserving of more than five stars. If I could, I would. There has been a lot of focus in recent years on the Nazi members that escaped to South America, but rarely have I seen much focus on those who came to America. It was interesting to read about these individuals and what happened to them as a result of their actions. This author did not only compile a book of meticulous research and facts, but also was compassionate and yet neutral in his writing. You can tell when reading This book is well deserving of more than five stars. If I could, I would. There has been a lot of focus in recent years on the Nazi members that escaped to South America, but rarely have I seen much focus on those who came to America. It was interesting to read about these individuals and what happened to them as a result of their actions. This author did not only compile a book of meticulous research and facts, but also was compassionate and yet neutral in his writing. You can tell when reading his words that he feels for those who were affected by the violence and unfairness of the Nazis. I appreciate feeling a connection with the author when reading historical accounts as it makes the reading less dry and impersonal. I also greatly appreciated that the recounting of events from the concentration camps was only briefly covered toward the beginning and thereafter only facts needed to support the book were used. It really does get tiring seeing so many books about this subject that simply spend page after page telling us what we already know. If you have an historical interest in this subject and would like to hear of events that you haven't heard before, this book is the way to go. I have the utmost respect for the writing ability of this author. This review is based on a complimentary copy from the publisher and provided through Netgalley. All opinions are my own.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Morris

    “The Nazis Next Door” is a book about the various Nazis living in our country after the war, along with how our government not only helped bring them here but helped them avoid prosecution through various means, including forged documents. As opposed to many history books, this one is easily read and accessible not only to the novice, but also provides little known information to historians. My major was history, with a concentration in Jewish history, and I was appalled by just how much has been “The Nazis Next Door” is a book about the various Nazis living in our country after the war, along with how our government not only helped bring them here but helped them avoid prosecution through various means, including forged documents. As opposed to many history books, this one is easily read and accessible not only to the novice, but also provides little known information to historians. My major was history, with a concentration in Jewish history, and I was appalled by just how much has been hidden for so long. The fact that Patton himself was an anti-Semite made me feel physically ill. A secondary benefit to the history lesson is the knowledge at just how carefully we need to question the actions of our own intelligence agencies. This is certainly a timely topic, and one that we could all use a reminder regarding. If a reader has an interest in the Holocaust, especially the more unexplored topics surrounding it, I cannot recommend “The Nazis Next Door” enough. Novice or professional, it is an excellent resource. This review is based upon an advance copy provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Chris Steeden

    ‘…but the number of postwar immigrants with clear ties to the Nazis likely surpassed ten thousand, from concentration camp guards and SS officers to top Third Reich policymakers, leaders of Nazi puppet states, and other Third Reich collaborators. Some entered openly. In through the front door came more than sixteen hundred Nazi scientists and doctors, men who were eagerly recruited to the United States by the Pentagon. Military leaders wanted desperately not only to exploit their scientific and ‘…but the number of postwar immigrants with clear ties to the Nazis likely surpassed ten thousand, from concentration camp guards and SS officers to top Third Reich policymakers, leaders of Nazi puppet states, and other Third Reich collaborators. Some entered openly. In through the front door came more than sixteen hundred Nazi scientists and doctors, men who were eagerly recruited to the United States by the Pentagon. Military leaders wanted desperately not only to exploit their scientific and medical achievements, but also to prevent the Russians from seizing their work first. They provided the scientists with visas, houses, offices, and research assistants. Officially, the top-secret program—known as Project Paperclip—was banned to any “ardent” Nazi who took part in wartime persecution.’ I had heard about Operation Paperclip. That last bit from above about any “ardent” Nazi was ignored. Wow! Wernher von Braun, a scientist, was brought in: ‘…a committed Nazi under Hitler who used slave laborers in a mountain factory to build the V-2 rockets that bombed London…’ I better stop quoting from this book otherwise I am just going to copy the whole text into my review. Why did they need these qualified Nazis? The cold war with Russia was heating up (getting colder?) and the US needed to ensure they were ahead of the game. The Nazis also hated the Russians but the Russians wanted them too. They were kidnapping unwilling scientists. Can you believe this? The book homes in on one Nazi enabler, Tscherim ‘Tom’ Soobzokov. He had a special order which ‘bestowed on him the power to roam the town carte blanche and go through the houses—asking questions and searching for the Jews and the Communists seen as threats to Hitler’s murderous regime.’ This was in the Krasnodar region. Tom would go on to work for the CIA and FBI after the Second World War when he had to fled to New Jersey of all places. He admitted that he was a Waffen SS Officer. There are others like the aforementioned von Braun plus Otto von Bolschwing and Dr Hubertus Strughold. Then there is the ‘ratline’ through Italy assisted by the Vatican that also enabled Nazi’s to escape Europe. Lichtblau details the Nazi hunters within the Justice Department. It is all really interesting stuff. Maybe this is just me but when I think of these really awful Nazis I don’t see them as real people. How can they be? Some of the stories in the book about what they did are beyond the pale. Horrific stuff but many went and lived in America where they worked and had a family. I just can’t get my head around it. How can you be part of the system killing millions and then go and work in the auto-industry in the US and settle down with a wife and kids. Baffling. Anyway, enough of my ramblings. This is an intriguing book. Well worth a read if this subject is of interest to you.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Matt Bennett

    Nazis in America? Sure, you're thinking - Werner Von Something or other helped us with the rockets. And maybe a SS thug or two slipped through the cracks and came here and built cars in Ohio for a while. But we basically caught them and booted them out, right? Wrong. As Pulitzer-winner Eric Lichtblau shows in this absolutely riveting account, the US government helped up to 10,000 (TEN THOUSAND!) Nazis - some of them high-ranking officials with major roles in the Holocaust - get into the country an Nazis in America? Sure, you're thinking - Werner Von Something or other helped us with the rockets. And maybe a SS thug or two slipped through the cracks and came here and built cars in Ohio for a while. But we basically caught them and booted them out, right? Wrong. As Pulitzer-winner Eric Lichtblau shows in this absolutely riveting account, the US government helped up to 10,000 (TEN THOUSAND!) Nazis - some of them high-ranking officials with major roles in the Holocaust - get into the country and stay here. Why? Good damn question. Ostensibly because they were anti-Soviet. But rank anti-semitism in the CIA, FBI, State Dept and elsewhere helped as well. So while legions of brutalized Jewish survivors struggled to rebuild lives in war-shattered Europe, the murderous scumbags of the Third Reich were ushered into the relative nirvana of post-war America by our own government. Lichtblau (who, full disclosure, is a friend) has written a compelling, infuriating, and vitally important account of this extraordinary black mark in American history. It is an absolute must-read.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ruth

    I learned a few things here that confirmed my dislike of a number of public figures--Patton for one. This book is another iteration of the large degree to which we did nothing to help the Jews (or other refugees) in the years during and after WWII. Leaving people in the concentration camps with their former Nazi torturers as overlords for many years, is just one example. I kind of knew, but not really, how disgracefully we behaved. You see movies with the Americans "liberating" the camps and ass I learned a few things here that confirmed my dislike of a number of public figures--Patton for one. This book is another iteration of the large degree to which we did nothing to help the Jews (or other refugees) in the years during and after WWII. Leaving people in the concentration camps with their former Nazi torturers as overlords for many years, is just one example. I kind of knew, but not really, how disgracefully we behaved. You see movies with the Americans "liberating" the camps and assume it's all hunky-dory from there. It almost never was; and that's a good thing to know. All this took up about 3 chapters, and then we home in on some fairly wearying stuff about what the CIA and FBI did to help the Nazis speed on over to the USA to become some rather useless spies. Meanwhile the refuges continued to suffer. This latter part of the book, about 75%, was not very interesting. Almost immediately after the war (I didn't realize the time frame on this) we got very worried about what Russia could do to us, and our man focus was on out-spying them. For us the war was over; we hadn't suffered much, so we left those who had continuing on with their suffering and dying. My problem overall is that what the book had to offer, compared to many other tomes on the same subject, is very light.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey

    Given the recent release of the CIA's "Torture Report," perhaps it is fitting to be reading another scathing indictment on them (and other American intelligence agencies), who have failed time and again to uphold the very values that America purports to stand for. Well written and completely engaging from start to finish, this book reveals with startling detail the numerous ways in which Nazi war criminals came to the United States after the war. The assistance they received from the U.S. governm Given the recent release of the CIA's "Torture Report," perhaps it is fitting to be reading another scathing indictment on them (and other American intelligence agencies), who have failed time and again to uphold the very values that America purports to stand for. Well written and completely engaging from start to finish, this book reveals with startling detail the numerous ways in which Nazi war criminals came to the United States after the war. The assistance they received from the U.S. government is the most distressing part of this narrative. Though the Project Paperclip story wasn't exactly new, it was my first time reading about it. I found it particularly disappointing that NASA was where many of the Nazi scientists ended up. Space exploration has a tinge of idealism and optimism to it, but it seems so tainted when you know that some of the most pivotal moments in its history have been made possible by the efforts of these men.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Prince William Public Libraries

    As the title suggests, Eric Lichtblau, a Pulitzer Prize winning investigative reporter, tells the story of how America became a safe haven for thousands of Nazi war criminals. What makes this book different from the others about the same subject are the new facts that are brought to light by the author using recently declassified documents that show how US intelligence agencies because of their fear of communism, collaborated with Nazis to block investigations by Justice department and reporters As the title suggests, Eric Lichtblau, a Pulitzer Prize winning investigative reporter, tells the story of how America became a safe haven for thousands of Nazi war criminals. What makes this book different from the others about the same subject are the new facts that are brought to light by the author using recently declassified documents that show how US intelligence agencies because of their fear of communism, collaborated with Nazis to block investigations by Justice department and reporters that tried to expose their criminal past. This book is quite captivating, full of interesting facts some really horrific. A recommended reading especially for those interested in history. -Nancy K. Click here to find the book at the Prince William County Public Library System.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    A detailed accounting of the US's active recruitment and harboring of top Nazi officials responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths during the Holocaust. I took off one star because the book reads as just that, an accounting, for a good portion, making it a bit tedious and occasionally hard to follow, but it gathers steam as in some cases justice is finally served. Regardless, everyone should read this book. Just prepare to be horrified by what the US government did in the name of stopping A detailed accounting of the US's active recruitment and harboring of top Nazi officials responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths during the Holocaust. I took off one star because the book reads as just that, an accounting, for a good portion, making it a bit tedious and occasionally hard to follow, but it gathers steam as in some cases justice is finally served. Regardless, everyone should read this book. Just prepare to be horrified by what the US government did in the name of stopping communism.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sandi

    This made me mad but it needed to be written I agree it's Pulizer winner

  12. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    While I knew that we brought over Nazi rocket scientists to work on our rocket programs (later, NASA) I had always thought of them as just white jacketed nerds at a blackboard not really connected to the Holocaust. Unfortunately, the greats such as Werner Von Braun were responsible for running the slave camps that produced the V2 rockets, and as such were directly involved in the mistreatment and murder of their workers. Worse than that, are the many senior-level Nazi SS officers that were broug While I knew that we brought over Nazi rocket scientists to work on our rocket programs (later, NASA) I had always thought of them as just white jacketed nerds at a blackboard not really connected to the Holocaust. Unfortunately, the greats such as Werner Von Braun were responsible for running the slave camps that produced the V2 rockets, and as such were directly involved in the mistreatment and murder of their workers. Worse than that, are the many senior-level Nazi SS officers that were brought to the US to be Spies against the Soviets for the CIA. This book takes you through the stories of many agents of the Third Reich that were brought into the US, ranging from the lowly death-squad murderer to colleagues of Eichmann, in order to assist the US with rocketry or spying. It then chronicles the attempts of the Justice Department Special Nazi Unit founded during the Carter administration to deport these Nazis, sometimes successful, sometimes not, and the attempts by the Reagan administration (pat buchanan) to block deportation of these war criminals. I'm glad I read it, but frustrated at my country.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    Excellent book explaining in detail how the US Government aided, harbored, relocated, and employed known Nazis at the end of WWII, even as the Jews and other persecuted groups languished in the camps, unable to secure visa's or find places to go. US Government officials are named, most who were more than happy to overlook "minor war crimes" as the re-tooled bio's and files read, in order to bring in known high-level Nazis who could help in the Cold War against Russia, some even before the war en Excellent book explaining in detail how the US Government aided, harbored, relocated, and employed known Nazis at the end of WWII, even as the Jews and other persecuted groups languished in the camps, unable to secure visa's or find places to go. US Government officials are named, most who were more than happy to overlook "minor war crimes" as the re-tooled bio's and files read, in order to bring in known high-level Nazis who could help in the Cold War against Russia, some even before the war ended. Files were scrubbed, polygraph test discrepancies were overlooked, and the US Government was willing to turn a blind eye. It wasn't until decades later, as US public sentiment shifted, that investigations began to "find" these criminals, long hidden by our own government. Full disclosure, I couldn't finish the book. While reading account after account, it was clear how rampant anti-semitism was here in the US, and how that set the stage for what occurred. The book is very detailed, and even without finishing it, it was clear how it turned out.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    A few years ago I read "The Good German" by Joseph Kanon. It was an interesting work of fiction set in Berlin about how the American and Russian victors were scrambling to secure scientists and other "good Germans". The goal was two fold: keep that scientist from the other side and to get him to your home country to benefit from his expertise. Wonderful book, so-so movie. The Nazi's Next Door is the true story of how and why the United States brought in 10,000 Nazis to work for an intelligence ag A few years ago I read "The Good German" by Joseph Kanon. It was an interesting work of fiction set in Berlin about how the American and Russian victors were scrambling to secure scientists and other "good Germans". The goal was two fold: keep that scientist from the other side and to get him to your home country to benefit from his expertise. Wonderful book, so-so movie. The Nazi's Next Door is the true story of how and why the United States brought in 10,000 Nazis to work for an intelligence agency or NASA. I was astounded how the U.S. government overlooked and/or "white washed" records of gross war criminals in order to benefit from Nazi expertise and to keep them from the Russians. Criminals were not punished if they had value. Instead they were given American citizenship and a paycheck. This is a well researched book on a part of history that is not well known.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    When I was in high school, I got to go to a speech by Werner Von Braun. I can't really remember anything he said, because I could not get that Tom Lehrer song lyric - "Nazi, Shmatzi, says Werner Von Bran" out of my head. I learned a lot about Project Paperclip (the US plan to bring over Nazi rocket scientists to work on the space program) from this book. But this also contains a number of stories about the CIA recruiting former Nazis to spy on the Soviets - they cared more about the Communist Co When I was in high school, I got to go to a speech by Werner Von Braun. I can't really remember anything he said, because I could not get that Tom Lehrer song lyric - "Nazi, Shmatzi, says Werner Von Bran" out of my head. I learned a lot about Project Paperclip (the US plan to bring over Nazi rocket scientists to work on the space program) from this book. But this also contains a number of stories about the CIA recruiting former Nazis to spy on the Soviets - they cared more about the Communist Cold War threat than they did about WWII Nazi atrocities. It's so maddening and shameful, but not completely unexpected. Very well researched.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Relstuart

    An interesting and at times, sad, book about how some terrible people managed to come to America and stay under the radar after doing terrible things during the holocaust. I'm not as confident as the author is about von Braun's record being as evil as the author indicates. Most of the other folks mentioned seems to be fairly straightforward though. Two people guilty of terrible things became American citizens and beat legal efforts to look at deporting them in court and then were subsequently mu An interesting and at times, sad, book about how some terrible people managed to come to America and stay under the radar after doing terrible things during the holocaust. I'm not as confident as the author is about von Braun's record being as evil as the author indicates. Most of the other folks mentioned seems to be fairly straightforward though. Two people guilty of terrible things became American citizens and beat legal efforts to look at deporting them in court and then were subsequently murdered. Their deaths remain unsolved. Several others had their citizenship removed because they did not reveal their past and lied during their application process.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Wes McKibbon - The Neighborhood Korner

    This is a great book on the American Experience. Being a history buff I have a good knowledge about the abuses in our history, but was unaware of histories greatest men like General Patton and his racist views against the Jews. The book made me think of the Von Braun Civic Center that proudly represents Huntsville Alabama and now think of the center's original and current directors with disdain. I was stunned by the extent of the covert operations of the CIA, FBI, Justice Department disclosed in This is a great book on the American Experience. Being a history buff I have a good knowledge about the abuses in our history, but was unaware of histories greatest men like General Patton and his racist views against the Jews. The book made me think of the Von Braun Civic Center that proudly represents Huntsville Alabama and now think of the center's original and current directors with disdain. I was stunned by the extent of the covert operations of the CIA, FBI, Justice Department disclosed in the book. Research appeared to be very thorough, well annotated and compelling presented.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Brian Morris

    Disturbing, very disturbing. The quote from Allen Dulles, future CIA director, about how his agents should be free to talk to the devil himself if it would help in the Cold War nicely summarizes the story told in this book. This Faustian bargain with the devil is a testament to how paranoia and fear of communism could lead to moral lapses. The book is a little disjointed, but I found it to be a very interesting account of how so many Nazis came to America and of the much belated attempt to track Disturbing, very disturbing. The quote from Allen Dulles, future CIA director, about how his agents should be free to talk to the devil himself if it would help in the Cold War nicely summarizes the story told in this book. This Faustian bargain with the devil is a testament to how paranoia and fear of communism could lead to moral lapses. The book is a little disjointed, but I found it to be a very interesting account of how so many Nazis came to America and of the much belated attempt to track them down for prosecution.

  19. 4 out of 5

    John Schachter

    This book is both fascinating and infuriating. It was amazing to learn to what degree the CIA (mainly) sought and harbored evil Nazi leaders in the United States following WW2. Cheers to the DOJ heroes who wouldn't give up the fight to find and justly punish (or at least remove U.S. citizenship from) these Nazis. I also appreciated how the book made the simple and clear case that Pat Buchanan is a despicable person who has chosen to make defending ex-Nazis one of his life's causes. Shame on Rona This book is both fascinating and infuriating. It was amazing to learn to what degree the CIA (mainly) sought and harbored evil Nazi leaders in the United States following WW2. Cheers to the DOJ heroes who wouldn't give up the fight to find and justly punish (or at least remove U.S. citizenship from) these Nazis. I also appreciated how the book made the simple and clear case that Pat Buchanan is a despicable person who has chosen to make defending ex-Nazis one of his life's causes. Shame on Ronald Reagan for employing and listening to Buchanan, let alone following Buchanan's lead too much.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Edward Sullivan

    I knew a bit about Operation Paperclip but it is shocking to learn the extent to which the United States government gave safe haven to Nazi war criminals, protected them, and even intervened on their behalf. Meticulously researched and thoroughly documented.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Melinda Elizabeth

    The Nazi’s Next Door is a sombre read. Did you know that one of the founding fathers of the Space program was a card holding Nazi Dr that conducted many gruesome experiments on prisoners during WWII? No? Ever wondered why you don’t know this, or how he might have made it into the USA? An oft swept under the rug, pain in the backside of the Justice Department, the secret missions that recruited Nazi solders and top ranking officials into the USA post WWII continued to pop up from time to time and The Nazi’s Next Door is a sombre read. Did you know that one of the founding fathers of the Space program was a card holding Nazi Dr that conducted many gruesome experiments on prisoners during WWII? No? Ever wondered why you don’t know this, or how he might have made it into the USA? An oft swept under the rug, pain in the backside of the Justice Department, the secret missions that recruited Nazi solders and top ranking officials into the USA post WWII continued to pop up from time to time and was just as quickly quashed, much to the dismay of American citizens pursuing justice for loved ones. The book features some high profile cases, spanning from the 1950’s to present day, and highlights the challenges of convicting these Nazi’s of war crimes. There’s also an element of futility in the pursuit of justice, as many of these men are invalided by the time a judgement is handed down. A well researched book that really gives you a better understanding of the things you don’t know about your country. If your country is hiding Nazi’s, you do have to wonder, what else are they hiding and denying?

  22. 5 out of 5

    Bob Schnell

    How many Nazi war criminals do you think were allowed to emigrate to America immediately following WWII? How many concentration camp survivors were denied travel visas and forced to stay in the "liberated" camps for extended periods? The answer to both these questions is "far too many". Eric Lichtblau's "The Nazis Next Door" gives us an accounting of why so many Nazis were allowed to become American citizens (to work with us against Russia) and why so many surviving victims continued to be disen How many Nazi war criminals do you think were allowed to emigrate to America immediately following WWII? How many concentration camp survivors were denied travel visas and forced to stay in the "liberated" camps for extended periods? The answer to both these questions is "far too many". Eric Lichtblau's "The Nazis Next Door" gives us an accounting of why so many Nazis were allowed to become American citizens (to work with us against Russia) and why so many surviving victims continued to be disenfranchised long after Germany's defeat (anti-Semitism). The book goes on to trace how the Justice Department eventually got around to prosecuting war criminals in America despite the efforts of the CIA and Pat Buchanan to keep them under wraps. This book is designed to make the reader angry at the injustice of it all and it succeeds on that level. Where the books fails to engage the reader is in repetition and some poorly written procedural passages that became a bit of a slog. Still, it is recommended especially to younger readers who may not even recognize the name of Wernher Von Braun.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    This book was extremely eye-opening and intriguing but depressing as hell. The US government (including our intelligence agencies and NASA) not only allowed, but sought out, Nazi war criminals to come here to live and work for our scientific, military, and political gain ("We will ignore your allegiance to Hitler if you can help us fight against the big bad Commies!"). The duplicity of the CIA and FBI as they protected their Nazi war criminal assets was unfortunately and frustratingly unsurprisi This book was extremely eye-opening and intriguing but depressing as hell. The US government (including our intelligence agencies and NASA) not only allowed, but sought out, Nazi war criminals to come here to live and work for our scientific, military, and political gain ("We will ignore your allegiance to Hitler if you can help us fight against the big bad Commies!"). The duplicity of the CIA and FBI as they protected their Nazi war criminal assets was unfortunately and frustratingly unsurprising to me, having read other books about the shady practices of these organizations in the past (I'm sure the ghost of J. Edgar Hoover will begin illegally spying on me for that comment). And then there was the anti-Semitism permeating our post-WWII federal government and military. I'm glad I read this book but I could only take it in small doses before I got too sad and angry and had to cast it aside for awhile. Reading it through the lens of President Trump's recent EO regarding immigration made the experience all the more infuriating.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Joy

    Exposes the coverup for nazis among us: I really learned a lot from reading this book about things I never knew, which shows me the United States has always been involved in wrongdoings, from its inception as a nation and slaughtering our native Americans to covering up crimes of nazis to allow them to live among us. I also think it reprehensible that the CIA and our government felt it was more important for the nazi war criminals to help us develop technology for space and that then they became Exposes the coverup for nazis among us: I really learned a lot from reading this book about things I never knew, which shows me the United States has always been involved in wrongdoings, from its inception as a nation and slaughtering our native Americans to covering up crimes of nazis to allow them to live among us. I also think it reprehensible that the CIA and our government felt it was more important for the nazi war criminals to help us develop technology for space and that then they became celebrated heroes, and it did not matter that many of them killed hundreds of thousands of people to cleanse society! Reminds of what is going on today and with all the racial prejudices that have never gone away and are just hidden beneath the skin. We've been involved in this type behavior since our country's inception. We need to be a more humanitarian society throughout the world. We are one people - humans - but we don't act like that.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Angela H.

    I found the book to be fascinating. I learned the information from the big picture standpoint on how Nazis were able to sneak into the US and avoid trial. After reading this book, the concept of justice came into my mind. From Nazi perspective, the past is the past. Why are you obsessed with it 10+ years later? For the surviving seniors, justice seems unnecessary when all they did was follow orders. From the Nazi children growing up in US, I'm shocked to find out about my parent identity. It wou I found the book to be fascinating. I learned the information from the big picture standpoint on how Nazis were able to sneak into the US and avoid trial. After reading this book, the concept of justice came into my mind. From Nazi perspective, the past is the past. Why are you obsessed with it 10+ years later? For the surviving seniors, justice seems unnecessary when all they did was follow orders. From the Nazi children growing up in US, I'm shocked to find out about my parent identity. It would have not been easy for the children. For these US born children, injustice can be felt in terms of how they treated due to their parents identity as a Nazi. From the Jewish community, you are receiving lenient punishment for what you did to us. You deserve worse. In a way, justice is not adequately served for this group.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Natalie

    Loved this book - I couldn't put it down. I've read a lot of books on World War II and the Holocaust, but most of those books end in 1945 at the close of the war. This book starts where the others leave off - with the aftermath of the war. I was horrified (but not totally surprised) to learn that the US overlooked the pasts of some of the most notorious Nazi criminals just to gather intelligence against the Russians during the cold war and allowed them to settle here in the US. This book weaves Loved this book - I couldn't put it down. I've read a lot of books on World War II and the Holocaust, but most of those books end in 1945 at the close of the war. This book starts where the others leave off - with the aftermath of the war. I was horrified (but not totally surprised) to learn that the US overlooked the pasts of some of the most notorious Nazi criminals just to gather intelligence against the Russians during the cold war and allowed them to settle here in the US. This book weaves through story after story of the efforts of the Justice Department to bring these Nazis to justice years later. Very engaging; I learned quite a bit and plan to study this topic further. I highly recommend it.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Gretchen

    Wow-the stuff one doesn't know about their government. This was the most fascinating book I've read in a long time. The sub title says it all - How America Became a Safe Haven for Hitler's Men. Even though I was fascinated, I was equally angry that this activity was sanctioned. I liked the way the chapters were chronological and focused on one Nazi at a time. Author Lichtblau did a great job and certainly re-educated me on some WWII history.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Nicole Marble

    Newly released documents have added hugely to our knowledge of what happened at the end of WWII when thousands of Nazis were welcomed to the U.S. as immigrants, while at the same time surviving European Jews were held in camps. J. Edgar Hoover and his FBI employed those same Nazis to spy on communists, both real and imagined. As did our CIA which continued until recently to protect 'their Nazis'. Shocking!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mrs. Hassig

    This book is so disturbing! I read it in my car going to and from school and even though it was 9 CDs I forced myself to listen until the bibliography!! I intend to use this book as part of my lesson with my 8th graders on Raoul Hillberg's "perpetrators, collaborators, beneficiaries, victims and bystanders. It is so well written by a Pulitzer Prize winning author that I bought a copy for my library! Sadly, all is not bright and shiny in America sometimes.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    So most of this book just made me angry. I am disgusted that the people in power in this country forgave Nazis because they might have information against the communists. These people should have never been let into this country and yet the government defended & covered for them. I wish I thought we've learned from our mistakes but I know we haven't. So most of this book just made me angry. I am disgusted that the people in power in this country forgave Nazis because they might have information against the communists. These people should have never been let into this country and yet the government defended & covered for them. I wish I thought we've learned from our mistakes but I know we haven't.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.