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Weapon X

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Of all the members of the X-Men, none has been more popular than Wolverine -- yet the origins of this mutant hero had always been tightly shrouded in mystery. Aside from a few hazy tidbits, Wolverine's past has always been little more than a blank slate. In WEAPON X, acclaimed writer/illustrator Barry Windsor-Smith peels back this veil of secrecy to reveal how Wolverine's Of all the members of the X-Men, none has been more popular than Wolverine -- yet the origins of this mutant hero had always been tightly shrouded in mystery. Aside from a few hazy tidbits, Wolverine's past has always been little more than a blank slate. In WEAPON X, acclaimed writer/illustrator Barry Windsor-Smith peels back this veil of secrecy to reveal how Wolverine's skeleton became laced with an indestructible adamantium metal. Kidnapped and drugged, Wolverine is subjected to a series of sadistic medical experiments designed to create the perfect soldier. As he battles back against this tortuous experience, Wolverine proves himself to be a true hero long before his days as an X-Man.


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Of all the members of the X-Men, none has been more popular than Wolverine -- yet the origins of this mutant hero had always been tightly shrouded in mystery. Aside from a few hazy tidbits, Wolverine's past has always been little more than a blank slate. In WEAPON X, acclaimed writer/illustrator Barry Windsor-Smith peels back this veil of secrecy to reveal how Wolverine's Of all the members of the X-Men, none has been more popular than Wolverine -- yet the origins of this mutant hero had always been tightly shrouded in mystery. Aside from a few hazy tidbits, Wolverine's past has always been little more than a blank slate. In WEAPON X, acclaimed writer/illustrator Barry Windsor-Smith peels back this veil of secrecy to reveal how Wolverine's skeleton became laced with an indestructible adamantium metal. Kidnapped and drugged, Wolverine is subjected to a series of sadistic medical experiments designed to create the perfect soldier. As he battles back against this tortuous experience, Wolverine proves himself to be a true hero long before his days as an X-Man.

30 review for Weapon X

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ronyell

    5.5 stars! Brief history: Ever since I heard so much about Wolverine’s past in the Weapon X program and how much that played a huge role in the character he has become, I wanted to try and read more on his back story of being apart of Weapon X. To be honest, “Wolverine: Weapon X” was the first story I have read that details the horrors that Wolverine has to go through when he was apart of the Weapon X program and I must say that I really enjoyed this book much more than I expected! What 5.5 stars! Brief history: Ever since I heard so much about Wolverine’s past in the Weapon X program and how much that played a huge role in the character he has become, I wanted to try and read more on his back story of being apart of Weapon X. To be honest, “Wolverine: Weapon X” was the first story I have read that details the horrors that Wolverine has to go through when he was apart of the Weapon X program and I must say that I really enjoyed this book much more than I expected! What is the story? Basically, this comic details the horrors that Wolverine goes through when he is abducted by scientists working on Weapon X and some of the horrors that Wolverine faces is that he has to go through the terrible experiments that the scientists put him through such as having him kill animals like wolves and bears and attaching his body to so many cords from machines. One day however, Wolverine escapes the program and causes massive mayhem in the lab! What I loved about this comic: The story itself: Even though this was the first time I have read one of Wolverine’s back stories on his life with Weapon X and there are like millions of other stories that tells Wolverine’s back story with Weapon X, I found Barry Windsor-Smith’s interpretation on Wolverine’s back story to be extremely interesting and intense. Even though the story is told more from the Professor’s point of view than from Wolverine’s, it was shocking and intense to see Wolverine being treated like a lab animal just so the Weapon X program could turn Wolverine into their own personal soldier. I also loved the way that Barry Windsor-Smith made this story just as effective by not having any kind of narration in this comic to explain the story and instead tells this story by showing the readers the tortures that Wolverine has to go through when he was being held as an experiment for Weapon X and I also loved the way that Barry Windsor-Smith basically had the characters tell the story through their interactions with each other such as the Professor discussing the procedures of experimenting on Wolverine to his employees. I also loved the way that Barry Windsor-Smith gave a frightening and intense tone to this story since Wolverine’s experiences with Weapon X are so terrifying that this actually reads out more like a horror story than an actual “X-Men” story. Barry Windsor-Smith’s artwork: Barry Windsor-Smith’s artwork on this story was extremely dazzling and intense. I loved the intense artwork on the scenes where Wolverine is being experimented on since so much detail is put into the scenes. I will admit that I am a huge fan of images that has blood and gore in it. I know that sounds a little gross, but Barry Windsor-Smith put so much detail into the gory scenes that I found myself being more drawn into the story because of that. Some of the gory scenes in this book that stood out for me were of the scenes where wires and needles are being stuck through Wolverine and the scenes where Wolverine’s claws shoot out of his hands and you can see blood spurting out his hands as the claws come out. What made me feel uncomfortable about this book: This story is really gory and frightening because it details the torture that Wolverine has to go through when he was being experiment on by the scientists working on Weapon X. There are so many gory images of Wolverine being experimented on that might make anyone who does not like gory images cringe such as the images of Wolverine fighting off animals and human beings and some images have shown Wolverine’s victims having their ribs being shown after they are killed by Wolverine. Also, the last few images in this story might be a tad bit disturbing since it turns into a nightmare when Wolverine is loose in the lab. There were also some confusing scenes for me that I had to really read the text closely to understand it and that was mainly towards the end of the story. I will not tell what happens at the end of the story since it might spoil the story, but it had that “things are not what they seem” vibe at the end that sort of confused me. Final Thoughts: Overall, “Wolverine: Weapon X” was an enjoyable read for me because it actually detailed the horrors that Wolverine faced in Weapon X in such vivid detail that I found myself really sympathizing with Wolverine as he was forcefully thrown into this predicament and I was horrified at the things that the people at Weapon X did to him, making this one of the most disturbing reads from the “X-Men” series I have ever came across. I know that there are other stories about Wolverine’s history with Weapon X, so please feel free to recommend me some other good titles about Wolverine’s Weapon X stories! Review is also shown on: Rabbit Ears Book Blog

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay

    The original telling of how Wolverine got his adamantium skeleton, first serialized in Marvel Comics Presents #72-84. Very confusing, nonlinear storyline, chaotic art/panel arrangments, dialogue mostly medical technobabble (from the doctors/nurses operating on Wolverine) or inarticulate grunts, yells and roars (from Wolverine). For most of the story, Wolverine is either anesthetized or freaking out and going into berserk rages, so there's not a lot of focus on his character. Instead, the narrati The original telling of how Wolverine got his adamantium skeleton, first serialized in Marvel Comics Presents #72-84. Very confusing, nonlinear storyline, chaotic art/panel arrangments, dialogue mostly medical technobabble (from the doctors/nurses operating on Wolverine) or inarticulate grunts, yells and roars (from Wolverine). For most of the story, Wolverine is either anesthetized or freaking out and going into berserk rages, so there's not a lot of focus on his character. Instead, the narrative focus is mostly on the doctors, technicians, nurses and various military personnel at the Weapon X facility, and questions of who knows what about what the Weapon X project really is, and who lied to whom about it. This stuff could be interesting, but since I never got much of a sense of who any of these characters were, their machinations and discoveries meant little to me.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Donovan

    "A creature of such power--shaken by his own shadow! Driven by fear--of himself!" YES. Part Wolverine's diary, part medical procedural, part horror and psychological thriller. If you've ever wondered what happened to Wolverine at Weapon X, this is the book. There are obvious ties to Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and themes of human versus monster and dehumanization. This is as much a soulful biography as prototypical Wolverine slasher. In addition to his fantastic and fast paced writing, Barry Wind "A creature of such power--shaken by his own shadow! Driven by fear--of himself!" YES. Part Wolverine's diary, part medical procedural, part horror and psychological thriller. If you've ever wondered what happened to Wolverine at Weapon X, this is the book. There are obvious ties to Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and themes of human versus monster and dehumanization. This is as much a soulful biography as prototypical Wolverine slasher. In addition to his fantastic and fast paced writing, Barry Windsor Smith's artwork is incredible and highly detailed. I'm shocked the Comics Code Authority approved this with how violent and graphic it is. True science-fiction horror. If you're a Wolverine fan, this is a must read and must own. "I am a man! And you--are the animal!"

  4. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    3.5 stars. This is an excellent Wolverine story that was originally published in Marvel Comics Presents #72 through #84. Introduced Cyber, one of my favorite Wolverine villains.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    This book explains how Wolverine came to have adamantium claws/skeleton. That’s it. He’s abducted, taken to a lab (where the entire book takes place), he’s mostly unconscious speaking very little, the adamantium bonds with his bones and his healing factor prevents him from dying, the scientist tries to control him, fails, Wolverine’s memory is wiped in the process, Wolverine kills everyone and escapes into the wilderness. If you’ve read a load of Wolverine books or even seen the first 2 X-Men mo This book explains how Wolverine came to have adamantium claws/skeleton. That’s it. He’s abducted, taken to a lab (where the entire book takes place), he’s mostly unconscious speaking very little, the adamantium bonds with his bones and his healing factor prevents him from dying, the scientist tries to control him, fails, Wolverine’s memory is wiped in the process, Wolverine kills everyone and escapes into the wilderness. If you’ve read a load of Wolverine books or even seen the first 2 X-Men movies and the Origins flick, all of this is already old news - you don’t have to read this. Most the book is really boring with dull clinical dialogue filling up the pages as we see Wolverine in stasis while he’s being operated on. I felt like this entire story could’ve been relayed in 4 pages or less as part of a larger Wolverine story - until I realised it had been done in numerous Wolverine/X-Men books, even improved upon. Because all of the interesting questions raised - how did they know about Logan’s healing factor? what is Weapon X and what is the purpose of it? who and why were they conducting these experiments? - are never answered. This book exists only to show Logan bonding with the adamantium, having his memory of this experiment wiped, and stumbling away leaving behind death and carnage. The art is pretty decent: the image of a naked Logan, long, wild hair, claws snikted, covered in blood, with chunks of machinery lashed onto him as he stands above a pile of corpses - it’s very cool, iconic even. But does one page of cool art make reading this book essential? Nope! Weak story and decent art aside, if you’re familiar with the character then chances are you know about Weapon X already, so reading this is kind of redundant - you won’t learn anything new. I sure didn’t and I’m not sure how this book is considered a classic. A classic yawner more like.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Danielle The Book Huntress (Back to the Books)

    My friend is the biggest Wolverine fan in the Milky Way solar system. He loaned me his Weapon X comics to read and to share the 'Wolverine' love. It was very good. I admit that Wolverine isn't my favorite X-Men (that's Gambit), but he's a very intriguing character with a dark side that I find appealing mixed with this desire for justice. What can I say? I love my antiheroes. The man has had his share of tragedy, and seeing how he gained the adamantium helped me to see him in a deeper light. Thank My friend is the biggest Wolverine fan in the Milky Way solar system. He loaned me his Weapon X comics to read and to share the 'Wolverine' love. It was very good. I admit that Wolverine isn't my favorite X-Men (that's Gambit), but he's a very intriguing character with a dark side that I find appealing mixed with this desire for justice. What can I say? I love my antiheroes. The man has had his share of tragedy, and seeing how he gained the adamantium helped me to see him in a deeper light. Thanks, Mike, for giving me the opportunity to read these. PS. The X-Men Origins: Wolverine movie was a pretty lousy substitute for the real thing (and we won't even go into how they ruined Deadpool). If you are a fan of Wolverine from the tv shows and the movie, please take this opportunity to read about the real character from the comic books.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    Barry Windsor-Smith remains one of my all-time favorite comic artists. Completely unique. Smith's writing on the other hand is often poor and this collection is no exception. A weak build-up; jumpy narrative. The "scientists" and security are all doofuses. Enjoy the art, skip the story.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Arpad Okay

    they don't write 'em like they used to. bloody dehumanizing horror more fit for a jim thompson cyberpunk novel than the pages of marvel comics presents. a childhood favorite of mine, it stands the test of time. i guess my dad knew BWS from his conan days, which is why he would buy possibly the bloodiest comic i've ever seen (worse than JTHM? possibly!) for his eager grade school-aged son. it's not all exposed ribs and bloody snrkt's, it's got a surreal cronenberg like i said cyberpunkness to it. they don't write 'em like they used to. bloody dehumanizing horror more fit for a jim thompson cyberpunk novel than the pages of marvel comics presents. a childhood favorite of mine, it stands the test of time. i guess my dad knew BWS from his conan days, which is why he would buy possibly the bloodiest comic i've ever seen (worse than JTHM? possibly!) for his eager grade school-aged son. it's not all exposed ribs and bloody snrkt's, it's got a surreal cronenberg like i said cyberpunkness to it. anyone know any other good BWS books?

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sans

    Yikes. Great origin story but I don’t recommend reading it when you have insomnia. I ended up with weird/bad dreams when I finally dropped off.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Himanshu Karmacharya

    Weapon X is drawn so beautifully that it leaves some unforgettable images in the mind of the readers. The writing was decent but I wasn't a huge fan of the narrative bubbles. They appeared so jumbled up and convoluted. Despite the faults, this book is an essential add to the Wolverine mythos.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Amy Rae

    One of those books that I think is a classic for a reason. It's unsettling as hell and pretty creative in the way it tells the story of where all that adamantium came from. After a brief look at Logan before he's captured for the Weapon X program, Windsor-Smith builds the narrative around the scientists and security keeping Logan under lock and key. For them, Logan's an animal to be controlled and tested, not a person; their dry observations contrast sharply with the pain he's clearly suffering One of those books that I think is a classic for a reason. It's unsettling as hell and pretty creative in the way it tells the story of where all that adamantium came from. After a brief look at Logan before he's captured for the Weapon X program, Windsor-Smith builds the narrative around the scientists and security keeping Logan under lock and key. For them, Logan's an animal to be controlled and tested, not a person; their dry observations contrast sharply with the pain he's clearly suffering in the art. There are places where things get a little jumbled--bits I had to read twice, panels with a little too much going on--but for the most part, I think it works well. And the final sequence, under the Northern Lights, was really satisfying. If you're expecting to learn something you don't already know about Wolverine, you're probably going to be disappointed. If you come in with the understanding that this is what every other X-Men story is building off, when it comes to this part of Logan's backstory, I think you'll find a worthy horror story from the late 80s.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Logan

    Very good book! So this is the story of how wolverine gets his animatum claws (not X-Men origins wolverine, don't even mention it!) I was surprised this book doesn't have any dialogue from Wolverine himself, its basically the scientists and them installing and testing Wolverines claws till the bloody confrontation at the end! In the end not bad!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ann D-Vine

    Before reading Weapon X, I didn't have a fear of being jammed with cables and needles and wires and mechanical horrors from beyond the imagination of even the folks who made anime like Akira or Ghost in the Shell or Neon Genesis Evangelion. I... I really wasn't anticipating that Weapon X could be horrifying? Maybe it's because I know (who doesn't?) the story of Wolverine in the Weapon X program. It's simple! Wolverine is taken into a secret underground research complex, he has Adamantium bonded Before reading Weapon X, I didn't have a fear of being jammed with cables and needles and wires and mechanical horrors from beyond the imagination of even the folks who made anime like Akira or Ghost in the Shell or Neon Genesis Evangelion. I... I really wasn't anticipating that Weapon X could be horrifying? Maybe it's because I know (who doesn't?) the story of Wolverine in the Weapon X program. It's simple! Wolverine is taken into a secret underground research complex, he has Adamantium bonded to his skeleton, he gets metallic claws (well, unless you take the retcon that he once had bone claws into consideration, which, um... how do I put it deftly... fuck that and fuck you), he kills some people in the underground facility and walks away. Then he fights Hulk and becomes an X-Men. It's that easy. Except it's not that easy. No, apparently it's terrifying! Because I didn't know, before going in, that they made Wolverine into a lumbering remote-control cyborg man! I'm not even going to apologize for spoiling that because this is my way of venting, goddamn it. It scares me! It's a stupid fear, because it'll never happen, but as someone who hates the idea of threading things under skin in most any context, the way that they thread cables and wires and machinery into Wolverine just... it is very, very sad to think about. And I feel Wolverine is very justified in smashing up and murdering all those people who abused him so. (People who didn't even know he was a mutant until they dragged him in, so what the actual hell, get your shit together, assholes!) Besides that, held together by haunting post-modernist nightmares as illustrated by also-author Barry Windsor-Smith - capturing the sort of taut technological horror that only people caught in the late-80s and early-90s evolution of the consumer computer market could conjure up - the story isn't extremely compelling. It spins its wheels a lot, and the layout of the dialog is singularly bizarre in ways I haven't observed before (reading sort of like a string across the page as apposed to the typical left-to-right, top-to-bottom format that I've grown accustomed to), making it something of a slog to read until the awaited and expected massacre. The weirdest thing is the twist-ish ending, that sort of pulls a fake-out on whether or not Wolverine actually killed certain characters and... I didn't quite understand where it was that one thing started happening that would have seen it diverge down that path. Maybe I'm slightly dim (very possible), but it took me by surprise in a way that made me think "wait, what? Who? Why? What?"... while I assume I was meant to think, "oh, of course!" The atmosphere of Weapon X is one very unique to its age, and even more unique to the Marvel brand as a whole. The gratuitous blood-spilling, the way mechanical tendrils and attachments are illustrated so compactly and so detailed, and the outright horrific use of tech-age body horror... these are elements that are married to a story that is made all the more tragic for their involvement, and it's unlike much of anything I've seen from Marvel or the X-Men - even basically knowing this story off by heart, as it has been repeated ad nauseam in film adaptations and animated segments and back-story snippets. I suppose its ability to surprise and shock, even with with an intimate knowledge of its scenario, is absolutely something to be applauded. Otherwise, I think this is more of a fascinating time capsule than any sort of classic Wolverine tale. I can wholeheartedly recommend it, but it has severe narrative flaws that can only partially be overlooked for the... and I'll say it again, I don't think I've used the word too much - sheer horror that it conjures up in my mind. The horror of being turned into a mechanical puppet and being directed to kill wolves, naked, in the snow, with a computer stapled to my face and Ethernet cables threaded into my arms and spine. You know. That ol' chestnut.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Izzy

    This book made me think about how your fears can stop you from accomplishing things when Wolverine was fighting skeletons on a boat. He'd said his greatest fear was the ocean, as his bones were scientifically replaced with Adamantuim - a very heavy metal like solid - which made him really heavy. "People wouldn't think I had any fears. Well, I don't - it's more of a phobia. But have you ever tried to swim with several tonnes worth of metal inside your body? It sucks." He'd once thought. But his fe This book made me think about how your fears can stop you from accomplishing things when Wolverine was fighting skeletons on a boat. He'd said his greatest fear was the ocean, as his bones were scientifically replaced with Adamantuim - a very heavy metal like solid - which made him really heavy. "People wouldn't think I had any fears. Well, I don't - it's more of a phobia. But have you ever tried to swim with several tonnes worth of metal inside your body? It sucks." He'd once thought. But his fears didn't hinder him, and he accomplished the mission. The writer is teaching us about having to believe in yourself because usually fears are what prohibit us from doing something we strive for. In my opinion, doing something you're terrified of is one of the hardest challenges you'll ever face. However, doing so can give you immense opportunities in the future.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    I'm not sure I like the false ending thing. It went along and I thought things were really happening, and then it turned out Logan had been set up or something (I'm still not sure) so then he had to go back and do it for real. I don't really know what it added. I suppose good for Logan for seeing through it? If it wasn't for that I would have rated it higher. It was gruesome and awful, as it should have been.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Dimitra

    When I first saw the illustrations I thought that they were "too much"... But after reading it, I think that they were perfect! Very powerful and strong! The story is heartbreaking... No more words can describe Logan's story...

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jesús

    I was not expecting this to hit me as hard as it did. I mean, it’s just a campy, B-movie-style retelling of Wolverine’s (from Marvel’s X-Men) origin story. But it’s somehow much, much more than that. Most of the action takes place in the claustrophobic confines of a few laboratory cells. But to call what happens in the book “action” is to give more momentum to the book’s plot than there actually is. It’s both an intensely psychological and a disturbingly bodily book. It’s visual storytelling tol I was not expecting this to hit me as hard as it did. I mean, it’s just a campy, B-movie-style retelling of Wolverine’s (from Marvel’s X-Men) origin story. But it’s somehow much, much more than that. Most of the action takes place in the claustrophobic confines of a few laboratory cells. But to call what happens in the book “action” is to give more momentum to the book’s plot than there actually is. It’s both an intensely psychological and a disturbingly bodily book. It’s visual storytelling told in the language of torture, suffering, technology, and physicality. Nothing happens, but at the same time, the stakes are as high as can be. While Barry Windsor-Smith might be forever remembered for his illustrations for the novel Frankenstein, this is the far superior retelling of Mary Shelley’s sci-fi masterpiece. And, no, you don’t need to know a thing about the X-Men, Wolverine, or any Marvel lore in order to be floored by this book. In fact, I’d even say that it’s unfortunate that it has anything to do with the character whatsoever. It reads beautifully and horribly all on its own.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    Good Wolverine origin story in the style of the 1990’s. Not a huge insight into the character within this plot but a good grounding that will make up some of Logan’s foundational attitudes and approaches as his story continues.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tom Ewing

    One of the ‘classic’ Marvel projects I’d never actually read, maybe because even at the time Wolverine felt so over-exposed - how little we knew - that the idea of finding out his origin felt like a chore. Of course Weapon X isn’t really “about” Wolverine or his origin; Logan here is the monster in a horror film, and the comic is a late bloom in that post-Dark Knight flowering of superhero comics. Windsor-Smith is the perfect auteur for a story that’s half barbarian, half cyberpunk, so of course One of the ‘classic’ Marvel projects I’d never actually read, maybe because even at the time Wolverine felt so over-exposed - how little we knew - that the idea of finding out his origin felt like a chore. Of course Weapon X isn’t really “about” Wolverine or his origin; Logan here is the monster in a horror film, and the comic is a late bloom in that post-Dark Knight flowering of superhero comics. Windsor-Smith is the perfect auteur for a story that’s half barbarian, half cyberpunk, so of course it all looks terrific, but what surprised me was how deft the scripting was, a sketch of the banality of organisational evil with its trio of villains/victims and their different relationships to the monstrous work at hand.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jedhua

    ESTIMATED DNF RATING: {1/5 star to 1.5+/5 stars} STANDARDIZED RATING: ESTIMATED DNF RATING: {1/5 star to 1.5+/5 stars} STANDARDIZED RATING: <1/5 stars>

  21. 5 out of 5

    Koen

    Great story! Seeing Logan suffer (of course not why this is great) after being attacked by Magneto, was hard to imagine, seeing his immaculate regeneration time after time .. But this was something else ... But in the aftermath we get a story seeing his vulnerability and also his determination, which makes this one hell of a story arc.. Won't go to much into detail of course, you know me ;) Just pick it up when you get the chance, you'll be wowed for sure!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sandy

    Oh this.... is... lovely!! Brutal, raw and heart breaking. Amazing illustrations.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Matty Dub

    3rd reading, as always it’s surprising to see this first time author write as well as he draws. 5/5

  24. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

    This is a masterpiece. This story delves into Wolverine's past, and how he went from being Logan to becoming The Wolverine. It's not pretty. It's not humane. It's brutal. It's violent. It's dehumanizing. It is glorious. Barry Windsor-Smith is a master at his craft, and we are delving into the depths of human depravity, where we believe others are less than we are, and we brutally set them to tasks as if they were not human. It is gritty. It is gory. When a couple of critics said that Barry Winds This is a masterpiece. This story delves into Wolverine's past, and how he went from being Logan to becoming The Wolverine. It's not pretty. It's not humane. It's brutal. It's violent. It's dehumanizing. It is glorious. Barry Windsor-Smith is a master at his craft, and we are delving into the depths of human depravity, where we believe others are less than we are, and we brutally set them to tasks as if they were not human. It is gritty. It is gory. When a couple of critics said that Barry Windsor-Smith draws the best naked X-Men, they were telling the truth. Logan is like a Greco-Roman statue. This story delves into slavery. Ownership. Unreliable narration. The depths of human behavior. Animal instinct. Brutality. This is an experience, and you owe it to yourself to read it start to finish. Logan is kidnapped and placed in a lab as part of an experiment. They don't seem to know that he's homo superior and has regenerative powers. They bond adamantium to his skeleton, and rewire his neural net to obey their commands. The problem is... what if they aren't in complete control?

  25. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Engel-Hodgkinson

    4.6/5 After watching the amazing send-off that is Logan in theaters, I went on a bit of an X-Men binge. I watched the first five movies right after and then bought a couple of Wolverine graphic novels. This is one of them. Weapon X is a story I've wanted to read for ages. Now that I've finally read it, I'm not disappointed. Matter of fact, my expectations have been exceeded, somewhat. The horrors Logan went through during the process of the Experiment X program were nothing to scoff at. The story o 4.6/5 After watching the amazing send-off that is Logan in theaters, I went on a bit of an X-Men binge. I watched the first five movies right after and then bought a couple of Wolverine graphic novels. This is one of them. Weapon X is a story I've wanted to read for ages. Now that I've finally read it, I'm not disappointed. Matter of fact, my expectations have been exceeded, somewhat. The horrors Logan went through during the process of the Experiment X program were nothing to scoff at. The story of how he got his adamantium and amnesia is legendary. Now I know the finer details. Windsor-Smith has crafted a horrific psychological sci-fi origin story for the clawed mean machine named Wolverine, and his spectacular artwork elevates its somewhat lacking story to greatness. What do I mean by "lacking"? Well, our characters are barely characters; mere caricatures, really. Despite the whole story revolving around Logan and his kidnapping to his experimentation to his weaponization, Logan's character himself hardly transcends into human territory. He barely talks, mostly growls, and groans a lot. The people who control him are more human than he, which doesn't seem to be Windsor-Smith's intention... Still, though, Weapon X is a fantastic read. Its artwork and story are detailed and interesting despite their flaws, and I'm extremely happy to have finally had a chance to buy this and read it.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    1993, that was the time that Wolverine was still an interesting and enigmatic character for me. A time when he still wasn't making guest appearances in every second marvel comic. A time where, sure he was a force to be reckoned with, but still wasn't as indestructible as he'd later be showned to be. There was still alot of mystery to the character back then. Just how old was he? What exactly was the Weapon X thing? Why would he even want to join a team like the X-Men being such a loner? Is he rea 1993, that was the time that Wolverine was still an interesting and enigmatic character for me. A time when he still wasn't making guest appearances in every second marvel comic. A time where, sure he was a force to be reckoned with, but still wasn't as indestructible as he'd later be showned to be. There was still alot of mystery to the character back then. Just how old was he? What exactly was the Weapon X thing? Why would he even want to join a team like the X-Men being such a loner? Is he really Canadian? Canadians are usually so polite and mild-manered ;-) This book gives us a chapter in Wolverine's past that we hadn't seen before, other writers would later expand on the story, some with good ideas, others not so much. Barry Windsor-Smith is a great artist and can sometimes be a good wrtiter. This book gives us alot of great art, with 1 great idea, and for 1993 is pretty mature for a all-ages approved by the Comic Code of the time era. I pretty much quit reading the Marvel Comic Book Soap Operatic Stories after this story... In fact I'd quit it long before this story came out, the one reason I got the trade was for the Barry Windsor-Smith art, it was only a bonus that I actually found the story enjoyable.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Steve Dilks

    I put off reading this for years. I have no idea why, I just never got round to it. Even at the height of my THE UNCANNY X-MEN buying days in the late '80's/early '90's, I always seemed to pass it up. Well, watching the excellent LOGAN movie changed all that and reignited my interest in the character. Barry Windsor-Smith's WEAPON X is a hellishly thrilling ride. Full of science fiction medical horror and visceral carnage. The second half of the story plays like a tense horror movie with the centr I put off reading this for years. I have no idea why, I just never got round to it. Even at the height of my THE UNCANNY X-MEN buying days in the late '80's/early '90's, I always seemed to pass it up. Well, watching the excellent LOGAN movie changed all that and reignited my interest in the character. Barry Windsor-Smith's WEAPON X is a hellishly thrilling ride. Full of science fiction medical horror and visceral carnage. The second half of the story plays like a tense horror movie with the central cast running and hiding from the flesh ripping monster they have unwittingly created. All the tropes are there and played to good effect- the biological scientific experiment overseen by a sadistic doctor, the underling assistant who begins to question his own morality, the innocently adorable female companion and, of course, the savage killer on the loose. When all their vaunted technology fails, can they stand against the brute savagery of the monster they have created? Smith's artwork is at its most engaging here, stark and visceral. His depiction of Logan is one of the best in comics. Whether you agree to this being the definitive Wolverine origin or not, this is a great read worthy of your time.

  28. 5 out of 5

    JB

    What a gruesome story. What terrible things were done to Logan. My favorite part of the book is when Logan is hanging over the professor and the professor says to Logan: "You are an animal!" to which Logan responds: "I am Logan! Logan! I am a man! And you are the animal!" That says it al. This story shows who the real animal is. Not Logan, but the people in the Weapon X program. Wolverine is my favorite Marvel character, always has been. It was heartwrenching how these "people" or should I say a What a gruesome story. What terrible things were done to Logan. My favorite part of the book is when Logan is hanging over the professor and the professor says to Logan: "You are an animal!" to which Logan responds: "I am Logan! Logan! I am a man! And you are the animal!" That says it al. This story shows who the real animal is. Not Logan, but the people in the Weapon X program. Wolverine is my favorite Marvel character, always has been. It was heartwrenching how these "people" or should I say animals, dehumanize him. The art really grew on me and so did the writing. It was unlike any graphic novel/comic I've read so far. Barry Windsor-Smith did a great job as writer (cover)artist and letterer. I recommend this to the other Wolverine fans. People who want to learn about Wolverine during the Weapon X program.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rick

    Windsor-Smith's depiction of Logan's transformation into Wolverine still works. This 'origin story' is a magnificent piece of narrative illustration that truely exemplifies the potential of what graphic novels, or more accurately the drawn novel, can and should aspire to be. Windsor-Smith melds words and pictures into a single form in which the letters on the page and where they are placed are as meaningful to the entire narrative as what they are saying. This unification of all the elements of Windsor-Smith's depiction of Logan's transformation into Wolverine still works. This 'origin story' is a magnificent piece of narrative illustration that truely exemplifies the potential of what graphic novels, or more accurately the drawn novel, can and should aspire to be. Windsor-Smith melds words and pictures into a single form in which the letters on the page and where they are placed are as meaningful to the entire narrative as what they are saying. This unification of all the elements of the medium (words, pictures, colors, letters) has probably never been as successfully accomplished before. Windsor-Smith sets a standard that few in the industry can hope to aspire to, let alone match. While the story itself is little more than a vignette in the life of Logan/Wolverine, the presentation raises it to a state that far surpasses virtually any other Wolverine story.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Drown Hollum

    Weapon X is a fine bit of Marvel history that I'm proud to own. The aesthetic of Windsor-Smith's tale is unique, and integral to Wolverine's mythology. The art work is iconic, and the genesis story is one that is uniquely Logan. Other aspects don't hold up to the test of time though, including confused and jumbled lettering that made the already chaotic plot more difficult to follow. This collection is unfortunately just tough to read, between the scatterbrained lettering patterns and the chosen Weapon X is a fine bit of Marvel history that I'm proud to own. The aesthetic of Windsor-Smith's tale is unique, and integral to Wolverine's mythology. The art work is iconic, and the genesis story is one that is uniquely Logan. Other aspects don't hold up to the test of time though, including confused and jumbled lettering that made the already chaotic plot more difficult to follow. This collection is unfortunately just tough to read, between the scatterbrained lettering patterns and the chosen spoken dialects of the characters. Still though, the twist was fun, and it was easy to race to the finish despite the lettering hurdles.

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