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The Best of Poetry: Thoughts that Breathe and Words that Burn (In Two Hundred Poems)

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Here are 200 of the most beautiful and best-loved poems in the English language collected and arranged especially for Kindle readers. The design of this anthology is inspired by the structure of a sonnet: 14 Poems for 14 Themes Love; Parting and Sorrow; Inspiration; Mystery and Enigmas; Humour and Curiosities; Rapture; A Door Opens, A Door Closes; Memory; Tales and Songs; Here are 200 of the most beautiful and best-loved poems in the English language collected and arranged especially for Kindle readers. The design of this anthology is inspired by the structure of a sonnet: 14 Poems for 14 Themes Love; Parting and Sorrow; Inspiration; Mystery and Enigmas; Humour and Curiosities; Rapture; A Door Opens, A Door Closes; Memory; Tales and Songs; Nature; Cities; Solitude; Contemplation; and Animals. There are poems for every mood and occasion, and alongside the more famous works, are some lesser known gems of English poetry. Included are masterpieces by Shakespeare, Dickinson, Hart Crane, T.S. Eliot, E.E. Cummings, Walt Whitman, Robert Browning, Lewis Carroll, Edward Lear, Yeats, Shelley, Keats, Byron, Christina Rossetti, and many other outstanding poets. Please view the preview of this book for a full listing. At Elsinore Books we pride ourselves on creating beautiful Kindle Books, and devote great attention to formatting, and ease of navigation. This book contains a cleanly-styled contents page that permits easy movement between poems. You can return at any time to the contents page by clicking on the title of each poem. The Best of Poetry Series: Volume 1: The Best of Poetry: Thoughts that Breathe and Words that Burn Volume 2: The Best of Poetry: Shakespeare, Muse of Fire Foreword Anthologies of English verse are as abundant as mushrooms after rain. So why create another? Our defence amounts to this: the kind of anthology that we wanted to own did not exist – a collection in which the poems were as carefully arranged as selected; where Whitman’s “Crossing Brooklyn Ferry” could ignite the beauty of Hart Crane’s “Brooklyn Bridge”; where the enigmas of Browning’s “Meeting at Night”, and Hardy’s “Once at Swanage” might unravel each other; and the doubts besetting Anne Gregory in Yeats’s poem, find answers in Thomas Moore’s “Believe Me, If All Those Endearing Young Charms”. In this collection, we have tried to place poems together that will strike fire off one another, and bring new light to familiar lines. We decided to structure the anthology as a sort of sonnet sequence, with fourteen poems for fourteen themes. A two-poem prologue and epilogue bring the collection to exactly two-hundred poems. In selecting which poems to include, our aim was to present the best-loved poems in the English language alongside some less commonly anthologized masterpieces. Committed as we were to a definite fourteen by fourteen structure, there were of course, many wonderful poems that we were unable to include. Shorter, lyrical pieces have generally been favoured over the longer canonical works of English poetry. Each theme in this anthology is introduced by a famous definition of poetry. Taken together, these definitions give some idea of the beauty, enchantment, and richness that poetry can offer. But it is in the poems themselves that the real treasure is to be found. We hope you will enjoy reading them. Rudolph Amsel and Teresa Keyne


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Here are 200 of the most beautiful and best-loved poems in the English language collected and arranged especially for Kindle readers. The design of this anthology is inspired by the structure of a sonnet: 14 Poems for 14 Themes Love; Parting and Sorrow; Inspiration; Mystery and Enigmas; Humour and Curiosities; Rapture; A Door Opens, A Door Closes; Memory; Tales and Songs; Here are 200 of the most beautiful and best-loved poems in the English language collected and arranged especially for Kindle readers. The design of this anthology is inspired by the structure of a sonnet: 14 Poems for 14 Themes Love; Parting and Sorrow; Inspiration; Mystery and Enigmas; Humour and Curiosities; Rapture; A Door Opens, A Door Closes; Memory; Tales and Songs; Nature; Cities; Solitude; Contemplation; and Animals. There are poems for every mood and occasion, and alongside the more famous works, are some lesser known gems of English poetry. Included are masterpieces by Shakespeare, Dickinson, Hart Crane, T.S. Eliot, E.E. Cummings, Walt Whitman, Robert Browning, Lewis Carroll, Edward Lear, Yeats, Shelley, Keats, Byron, Christina Rossetti, and many other outstanding poets. Please view the preview of this book for a full listing. At Elsinore Books we pride ourselves on creating beautiful Kindle Books, and devote great attention to formatting, and ease of navigation. This book contains a cleanly-styled contents page that permits easy movement between poems. You can return at any time to the contents page by clicking on the title of each poem. The Best of Poetry Series: Volume 1: The Best of Poetry: Thoughts that Breathe and Words that Burn Volume 2: The Best of Poetry: Shakespeare, Muse of Fire Foreword Anthologies of English verse are as abundant as mushrooms after rain. So why create another? Our defence amounts to this: the kind of anthology that we wanted to own did not exist – a collection in which the poems were as carefully arranged as selected; where Whitman’s “Crossing Brooklyn Ferry” could ignite the beauty of Hart Crane’s “Brooklyn Bridge”; where the enigmas of Browning’s “Meeting at Night”, and Hardy’s “Once at Swanage” might unravel each other; and the doubts besetting Anne Gregory in Yeats’s poem, find answers in Thomas Moore’s “Believe Me, If All Those Endearing Young Charms”. In this collection, we have tried to place poems together that will strike fire off one another, and bring new light to familiar lines. We decided to structure the anthology as a sort of sonnet sequence, with fourteen poems for fourteen themes. A two-poem prologue and epilogue bring the collection to exactly two-hundred poems. In selecting which poems to include, our aim was to present the best-loved poems in the English language alongside some less commonly anthologized masterpieces. Committed as we were to a definite fourteen by fourteen structure, there were of course, many wonderful poems that we were unable to include. Shorter, lyrical pieces have generally been favoured over the longer canonical works of English poetry. Each theme in this anthology is introduced by a famous definition of poetry. Taken together, these definitions give some idea of the beauty, enchantment, and richness that poetry can offer. But it is in the poems themselves that the real treasure is to be found. We hope you will enjoy reading them. Rudolph Amsel and Teresa Keyne

30 review for The Best of Poetry: Thoughts that Breathe and Words that Burn (In Two Hundred Poems)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Shawn Thrasher

    There are so many incredible poems gathered here. I discovered some new poems and poets (Charlotte Mew's The Call has stuck in my mind ever since I read it) and re-discovered some old favorites (John Donne, Wordsworth). My mother-in-law kept a button jar. She's had to move into a care home, and we found the jar when we were cleaning out her house. The button jar was full of old buttons, new buttons, strangely shaped buttons, buttons of all colors, shapes and sizes, fantasy button, plain old butt There are so many incredible poems gathered here. I discovered some new poems and poets (Charlotte Mew's The Call has stuck in my mind ever since I read it) and re-discovered some old favorites (John Donne, Wordsworth). My mother-in-law kept a button jar. She's had to move into a care home, and we found the jar when we were cleaning out her house. The button jar was full of old buttons, new buttons, strangely shaped buttons, buttons of all colors, shapes and sizes, fantasy button, plain old buttons. That's how I would describe this anthology: it's like a button jar. Not every button in the button jar was beautiful; not every poem in here was meaningful to me right now. Like those buttons, I may appreciate even the non-beautiful poem at some future point in my life. That what makes poetry so cool.

  2. 5 out of 5

    MsSwisis

    ‘If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew To serve your turn long after they are gone, And so hold on when there is nothing in you Except the will which says to them: Hold on!’

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dan Gobble

    Not my usual fare, in regards to poetic styles. I've mostly stuck with more modern poets and free verse. But this collection gave me a greater appreciation of ryhming poems, as well as pre-1900's poetry and authors.

  4. 4 out of 5

    unknown

    Quite musings Nice, just nice, curl up in a corner with this and immerse yourself in some insightful poetry. These are some of the best poems in English language

  5. 5 out of 5

    Adam Mills

    Fine anthology in fourteen sections which is also the number of lines in a Sonnet.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Bernie Gourley

    This is a collection that gathers 14 poems for each of 14 different themes. If you’re a math whiz, you know that means it’s a collection of 196 poems, but they round it out with four bonus poems to make a clean 200. If you’re a poetry reader, many of these poems will be familiar. They’re classic works from master poets from the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries (a few earlier.) Still, they are worth revisiting, the collection is inexpensive, and the organization, itself, is thought-provoking. This is a collection that gathers 14 poems for each of 14 different themes. If you’re a math whiz, you know that means it’s a collection of 196 poems, but they round it out with four bonus poems to make a clean 200. If you’re a poetry reader, many of these poems will be familiar. They’re classic works from master poets from the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries (a few earlier.) Still, they are worth revisiting, the collection is inexpensive, and the organization, itself, is thought-provoking. The fourteen themes that create the organizational schema for the book are: 1.) rapture: words that burn, 2.) a door opens; a door closes, 3.) love, 4.) humor & curiosities, 5.) memory, 6.) nature, 7.) tales & songs, 8.) solitude, 9.) contemplation, 10.) mystery & enigma, 11.) parting & sorrow, 12.) animals, 13.) inspiration, and 14.) cities. Then there are a couple bonus poems each attached to both the introduction and the epilogue. As mentioned, the poets are mostly household names of English-language poetry, including: Emily Dickenson, Walt Whitman, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, William Blake, Percy Bysshe Shelley, John Keats, W.B. Yeats, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Thomas Hardy, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Carl Sandburg, T.S. Eliot, Wallace Stevens, Shakespeare, Lord Byron, Ben Johnson, Lewis Carroll, Oliver Wendell Holmes, William Wordsworth, A. E. Housman, Edgar Allen Poe, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and Robert Frost. There are some names that are less than household names, but none that are obscure to poetry aficionados. Again, many of the poems are well-known. Some of them are fragments of long poems, but most are stand-alone works. Examples of some of the standards include: “Chicago” by Sandburg, “If” by Kipling, “The Road Not Taken” by Frost, “Let My Country Awake” by Tagore, “The Tiger” by Blake, “The Raven” by Poe, “Kubla Khan” by Coleridge, “The Daffodils” by Wordsworth, “The Jabberwocky” by Carroll, “She Walks in Beauty” by Byron, and “There Is No Frigate Like a Book” by Dickinson. I enjoyed this collection. I’d read most of these poems before, but the vast majority deserve re-reading and re-reading again. I’d recommend it for poetry lovers.

  7. 4 out of 5

    James E. Bend

    James E. Bend I have memorized several of these poems. Some make me think, Some make me laugh and Some made me cry.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    Good collection of poems

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kim

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sanjeev Deonarine

  11. 4 out of 5

    Leather

  12. 4 out of 5

    Scott

  13. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mrs B G M Kirk

  15. 5 out of 5

    Roger Anderson

  16. 4 out of 5

    Gurpartap Singh

  17. 4 out of 5

    Anna Thomas

  18. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  19. 5 out of 5

    William Rowland

  20. 5 out of 5

    Grimalkin

  21. 4 out of 5

    david gee

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sumit

  23. 4 out of 5

    SarahA

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kat

  26. 4 out of 5

    Dr. Jennifer Sze

  27. 5 out of 5

    sunah

  28. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

  29. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mariam Kaviladze

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