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Cimarronin: The Complete Graphic Novel

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A disgraced outcast samurai living in early seventeenth-century Manila, Kitazume is contemplating ritual suicide when a divine force (of a sort) intervenes: Luis, a rogue Jesuit priest and Kitazume’s longtime friend. At Luis’s insistence, the samurai agrees to help smuggle a Manchu princess to Mexico. But little does he know that he’s really been dragged into an epic strug A disgraced outcast samurai living in early seventeenth-century Manila, Kitazume is contemplating ritual suicide when a divine force (of a sort) intervenes: Luis, a rogue Jesuit priest and Kitazume’s longtime friend. At Luis’s insistence, the samurai agrees to help smuggle a Manchu princess to Mexico. But little does he know that he’s really been dragged into an epic struggle for power. As they become embroiled in the deadly politics of New Spain, Kitazume uses his lethal skills to save his friends—and to find redemption. Meanwhile, Luis secretly works as a member of the legendary Shield-Brethren, whose mission is to see that neither China nor Spain controls the silver mines owned by Luis’s very father. As politics and greed collide, Kitazume must call upon his deadly skills once more. But he’s not just fighting to save his friends—he’s fighting for the redemption he so desperately craves. Packed with adventure, twists, and gorgeous visuals, Cimarronin: The Complete Graphic Novel collects Cimarronin: A Samurai in New Spain #1-3 and Cimarronin: Fall of the Cross #1-3.


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A disgraced outcast samurai living in early seventeenth-century Manila, Kitazume is contemplating ritual suicide when a divine force (of a sort) intervenes: Luis, a rogue Jesuit priest and Kitazume’s longtime friend. At Luis’s insistence, the samurai agrees to help smuggle a Manchu princess to Mexico. But little does he know that he’s really been dragged into an epic strug A disgraced outcast samurai living in early seventeenth-century Manila, Kitazume is contemplating ritual suicide when a divine force (of a sort) intervenes: Luis, a rogue Jesuit priest and Kitazume’s longtime friend. At Luis’s insistence, the samurai agrees to help smuggle a Manchu princess to Mexico. But little does he know that he’s really been dragged into an epic struggle for power. As they become embroiled in the deadly politics of New Spain, Kitazume uses his lethal skills to save his friends—and to find redemption. Meanwhile, Luis secretly works as a member of the legendary Shield-Brethren, whose mission is to see that neither China nor Spain controls the silver mines owned by Luis’s very father. As politics and greed collide, Kitazume must call upon his deadly skills once more. But he’s not just fighting to save his friends—he’s fighting for the redemption he so desperately craves. Packed with adventure, twists, and gorgeous visuals, Cimarronin: The Complete Graphic Novel collects Cimarronin: A Samurai in New Spain #1-3 and Cimarronin: Fall of the Cross #1-3.

30 review for Cimarronin: The Complete Graphic Novel

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nicolo Yu

    I like a good samurai story, but the thing about samurai stories I've read was that they were insularly set, in the islands of Japan. Cimarronin takes a samurai from its comfort zone and puts him in the middle of a slave revolt in Mexico. Another thing that I liked about this story was that it was set in and around the Spanish colonial empire, another milleu that's close to home and my country's history but woefully unexplored in the books and stories I've read. It's really great to find a writer I like a good samurai story, but the thing about samurai stories I've read was that they were insularly set, in the islands of Japan. Cimarronin takes a samurai from its comfort zone and puts him in the middle of a slave revolt in Mexico. Another thing that I liked about this story was that it was set in and around the Spanish colonial empire, another milleu that's close to home and my country's history but woefully unexplored in the books and stories I've read. It's really great to find a writer (or writers) that explore such settings because now I know for certain such stories exist.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Oliver Flores

    "Cimarronin: A Samurai in New Spain" is apparently part of a larger storytelling initiative that links various media platforms together around something called the Foreworld universe. A series of shared, speculative action/adventure stories, the Foreworld universe chronicles the evolution of a mysterious order of European warriors that employ a hybridized fighting style which is rooted in both western and eastern cultures. Got that? If not, that's okay because you don't have to be familiar with "Cimarronin: A Samurai in New Spain" is apparently part of a larger storytelling initiative that links various media platforms together around something called the Foreworld universe. A series of shared, speculative action/adventure stories, the Foreworld universe chronicles the evolution of a mysterious order of European warriors that employ a hybridized fighting style which is rooted in both western and eastern cultures. Got that? If not, that's okay because you don't have to be familiar with the larger Foreworld universe to enjoy "Cimarronin" on its own, in that this book also works as an independent story that tells its own ongoing yarn while delivering on an individual chapter/issue level. The story: In the seventeenth century, a dishonored samurai and a stowaway Chinese princess must help a rogue Jesuit priest protect his family’s silver mines in Mexico from an army of rebellious African slaves—the cimarrones. Though it works as an independent yarn, the overall collaborative spirit of the Foreworld universe is still felt in the resources that went into creating "Cimarronin"--one of the most heavily researched comics that I've ever read. Indeed, reportedly drawing heavily from historical texts such as "1493", the political backdrop to the story is rich and complex, setting the stage for an intriguing globetrotting adventure which will prove to have many twists and turns. As such, in painting its complex portrait of the New World, the script also avoids many of the clichés that are associated with this infamous period in history. For instance, the story never romanticizes feudal Japan or the samurai culture, nor does it simplify the transgressive Spanish conquistadores as a race of pompous, mustache-twirling villains. In a similar vain, the victimized Cimarrons are also never depicted as helpless primitives waiting to be either saved or slaughtered. On the contrary, they're depicted as fierce warriors in their own right with their own albeit much more limited agenda. The mesmerizing character design, settings and backgrounds are also lavish with well-researched period detail and atmosphere. Even more impressive, however, is how the flow of the story is never impeded or burdened by any of this detail, which, though intricate, lacks any kind of photo-realistic depth or weight that might preclude "Cimarronin" from still existing in an evidently imagined if not quite idealized comic book universe. What's more, this being a comic book, after all, the intricate detail on display is easily taken in at a glance, panel by panel, rather than in the course of pages worth of description. To be sure, though it has the scope and research of an intimidating globetrotting novel or movie, "Cimarronin" is still very much meant to be read like a comic book. A very violent one at that. Indeed, the remarkable research that went into this comic is most notable in the look and feel of the fighting styles on display, in particular that of the protagonist Kitazume, a weathered, scarred and battle-worn ronin. Kitazume wields his katana with a surgical efficiency and grace that could only be achieved through many years of combat experience, or through years of expert research on the part of the creative team. To be sure, the verisimilitude of Robert Sammelin's dynamic, poster-quality pencils along with Neal Stephenson's script (which was co-written with Charles C. Mann and Mark Teppo) was reportedly greatly informed by Ellis Amdur's historical expertise in the area of Japanese martial arts. Though Stephenson & Co. seem the borrow Akira Kurosawa's dark humor, in particular when it comes to severed limbs, you can definitely tell that the creative team here studied more than "The Master's" movies for this one. All in all, the research that went into this book makes for a very accomplished and attractive-looking package. Unfortunately, however, one area of the book that doesn't quite escape its supplementary influences is the script. The story opens with a darkly humorous scene depicting Kitasume in the process of committing ritual suicide when he's rather rudely interrupted by Father Luis, a Jesuit priest who maintains a warm but complicated friendship with the former. Though the reasons for Kitasume's status as a disgraced samurai are soon strongly hinted at in a pointed flashback (he's the son of pirates), these reasons don't seem persuasive enough to justify the proud Kitasume's sudden decision to join Father Luis on a mission that will lead to redemption. More flashbacks will be introduced in the subsequent chapters/issues to explain the backstory between these two characters in more depth. However, I couldn't escape the feeling that this dependence on flashbacks and backstory smacks of inefficient, if not sloppy storytelling that might be more suitable in a meandering novel than in a more concise, plot-driven comic book. No cheap shot intended, but it's interesting that "Cimarronin" is novelist Neal Stephenson's first foray into comics. Having said THAT, wouldn't you know it but the flashback sequences are quickly becoming the heart of the series. Ha. Indeed, functioning more like a parallel storyline than like expository backstory, these flashbacks depict the genesis of the humorous and at times moving relationship between Kitasume and Luis--who was also a formidable swordsman in his own right before he became a priest. Though they hail from imperious and violent nations, these flashbacks suggest that these men are black sheep who have proven more loyal to each over the years than to their respective warrior codes. Indeed, though samurai-in-training-Kitasume and the young Luis seem to share a kindred spirit as kids, in practical terms their rambunctious friendship seems to function more like a tribal arrangement, a sort of Huck Finn/Jim dynamic where mutual survival and status is dependent on repeatedly bailing each other out of fixes. As such, rather than provide any convincing proof as to why Kitasume would want to earnestly kill himself out of dishonor, so far these flashbacks seem to suggest that Kitasume's embrace of the samurai code is more the yield of a bitter, impulsive defiance than of a strict adherence to said code (the proud son of pirates has a lot to prove, namely that he's not afraid to die like a samurai). In turn, his subsequent quest for redemption as an adult seems to be carried out for reasons that are equally impulsive. Whether or not this is the point is still a bit murky in the script. Father Luis himself seems rather impulsive as well, in that he's rather inept and compassionate for a conquering hero--though he's definitely no real angel either, as he also tends to harbor self-serving agendas. Alas, a suicidal samurai who doesn't really want to die and a compassionate priest who doesn't really want to save anyone make for a compelling, if unfocused pair of leads whose true endgame is still difficult to discern at this point. Nonetheless, coupled with a Chinese princess who harbors a major personal agenda of her own, "Cimarronin: A Samurai in New Spain" is gradually living up to its billing as an intriguing, violent and entertaining action/adventure yarn that could become something special. 3.5 Note: In case you missed the hints, this is an incredibly violent comic book. A bunch of people get killed or maimed in rather graphic, surgical terms in the first issue alone. Reader be warned.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Aildiin

    The art for the first 3 issues is great, then we have a new artist switched in and the quality goes down. The story is just terrible...( Samurai + Manchu princess in middle of a rebellion of African warriors kept slaves in Mexico...) Stay away from this, even if you find it on sale at 1.99$ on Comixology like I did......

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jimmy

    A well written historical fiction graphic novel. The story takes place in the 1600s and span different locations and characters of different cultures who originated from different countries and even different continents! The two main characters of the story is a Japanese outcast samurai (a Ronin) named Kitazume and his acquaintance a Spanish Jesuit priest name Luis. Luis is cunning and doesn’t necessarily tell Kitazume everything while Kitazume isn’t necessarily naïve as a result of years of bei A well written historical fiction graphic novel. The story takes place in the 1600s and span different locations and characters of different cultures who originated from different countries and even different continents! The two main characters of the story is a Japanese outcast samurai (a Ronin) named Kitazume and his acquaintance a Spanish Jesuit priest name Luis. Luis is cunning and doesn’t necessarily tell Kitazume everything while Kitazume isn’t necessarily naïve as a result of years of being with his friend but still he goes along for the ride. The story begins in Manila, Philippines but moves on to New Spain involving characters from China/Manchuria, Native Americans, other Spaniards and slaves from Africa. I found the types of ethnic characters fascinating in of itself! The plot of the story involves geopolitical politics and the book describes the political climate pretty well and no doubt the series received a lot of help from the contribution of the coauthor Ellis Amdur who has written on Japanese martial arts and Charles C. Mann who wrote 1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus. Again this is a well told story. I enjoyed the art but at times I had a hard time distinguishing the characters apart especially when they are fighting or when the panels zooms in on the face up close. I had to slow down to figure who was who during those moments but from examining the details and context you get the idea of identifying the character. I consider this a minor constructive criticism. Overall I recommend this for leisure reading.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Griffin Youngstrum

    Not into this. It started out strong and I was excited for the world I was about to be thrown in, but it felt like I was reading a montage of a story than the actual story itself. Some panels were too distant from eachother. By that, I mean it was hard to figure how a set of characters and dialogue went from point A to B. The art in the beginning is the best, but transitions into a more rushed style that makes it hard for me to get enveloped in the setting.

  6. 4 out of 5

    JEn

    I didn't really like this one. The art is fine, but the story jumps around so much that I can't figure out what the heck is going on, and I don't really care about any of the characters. I feel like it isn't well developed and it is missing really important points, but I couldn't tell you what they are, because I just felt like who cares anyway. Not a good graphic novel. Underdeveloped and lacking.

  7. 4 out of 5

    David

    I read this as a political prelude to Tom Cruise's The Last Samurai. In reality there is absolutely no connection except for my fascination with samurai. I enjoyed the story but vastly prefer Stephenson's science fiction books to this graphic novel.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    Based on just cover art I would rate this pretty highly. I was pretty excited about it despite not knowing anything about it. Too bad the story doesn't hold up as well. It's just kind of meh. I don't know if there was much point to any of it. Probably Neal Stephenson's ode to his love of swords and different fighting styles with said swords. The art was very good though. I liked that a lot. And you could definitely tell there was someone familiar with proper martial arts involved. Most samurai r Based on just cover art I would rate this pretty highly. I was pretty excited about it despite not knowing anything about it. Too bad the story doesn't hold up as well. It's just kind of meh. I don't know if there was much point to any of it. Probably Neal Stephenson's ode to his love of swords and different fighting styles with said swords. The art was very good though. I liked that a lot. And you could definitely tell there was someone familiar with proper martial arts involved. Most samurai related things I've seen are done wrong and this was not. I can't decide if I give a bonus point or lose a point for the Princess Bride joke in there.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Joyce

    I liked it. It's not quite up to Neal Stephenson's other work (and I admit I'm a fan), but enjoyable enough.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    Solid story, but artwork was confusing at times. Occasionally difficult to tell who was who. The flashbacks were sometimes wrenching.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Phillip

    I thought this was a pretty cool book. It tells the story of a fallen samurai who travels to Mexico with a Jesuit priest and a Chinese princess. They each have their own motivations for making this trip, but they end up crossing paths in a very interesting way. As someone who likes history, this was a really strong story. It mixes in just enough of some seemingly disparate elements to give it the feel of something that could have happened. While this isn't a humor book by any means, there are som I thought this was a pretty cool book. It tells the story of a fallen samurai who travels to Mexico with a Jesuit priest and a Chinese princess. They each have their own motivations for making this trip, but they end up crossing paths in a very interesting way. As someone who likes history, this was a really strong story. It mixes in just enough of some seemingly disparate elements to give it the feel of something that could have happened. While this isn't a humor book by any means, there are some nice moments that amused me. Mostly these involve the copious amount of brothers that the Jesuit priest has. The relationships between the characters bolster the story a lot too. That combined with the historical details made it enjoyable even though it might not appeal to everyone. For the most part I enjoyed the art. The coloring and lettering are both done well. There is more action in this book than I initially expected. The only downfall to this is that sometimes the action didn't flow well from one panel to the next, making it difficult to understand how certain scenes unfolded. I was drawn in by Neal Stephenson's connection to the book and it didn't disappoint.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Garrison Kelly

    In seventeenth century Philippines, a disgraced samurai named Kitazume is on the brink of slicing his own stomach open in a hara-kiri ritual. His longtime Spanish priest friend Luis convinces him to stay alive long enough to journey to Mexico with him alongside a Chinese princess named Irgen. The three of them are now embroiled in a plot to prevent Spain and China from obtaining silver and slaves in Mexico knowing how much power it would give the corrupt nations. This struggle for supremacy in t In seventeenth century Philippines, a disgraced samurai named Kitazume is on the brink of slicing his own stomach open in a hara-kiri ritual. His longtime Spanish priest friend Luis convinces him to stay alive long enough to journey to Mexico with him alongside a Chinese princess named Irgen. The three of them are now embroiled in a plot to prevent Spain and China from obtaining silver and slaves in Mexico knowing how much power it would give the corrupt nations. This struggle for supremacy in the new world will be covered in blood, shattered bones, and battlefields full of dead bodies. Kitazume wouldn’t have it any other way if it means he’ll find redemption for his past sins. The first thing I enjoyed about this graphic novel was the action-packed violence that carried the story from page to page. The techniques the warriors used were reminiscent of something from a Bruce Lee or Jackie Chan movie. In other words, the attacks were fast-paced and technical as opposed to a wild, drunken brawl. The blood splatters and shattered bones were the end result of this delicious violence; R-rated brutality at its finest. Come to think of it, there’s another movie reference I’d like to make when describing the martial arts violence in this book: Kill Bill. If Quentin Tarantino wrote historical fiction graphic novels, he would have had Cimarronin in mind. Action genre lovers will get a huge kick out of reading this book, no pun intended. After all, it’s only entertaining when it happens to samurais and conquistadors, not the reader. Speaking of violence, it’s also satisfying to see African ex-slaves get revenge on their Spanish conquerors. The way slavery is depicted in this graphic novel is how it should be depicted in all platforms: brutal and heartbreaking. They were branded with hot irons, dumped in the ocean during transit, and treated like disposable trash by their white masters. The slaves have waited years to strike back against their masters. When the violence finally takes place, a gigantic wave of relief will wash over the reader and payback will taste like sweet strawberries dipped in gooey cream. There actually are instances in history of slaves attacking their masters as a means of escape. Knowing this is one of them (even though it’s fiction) will put a sick smile on the reader’s face. Enough about the violence; let’s talk about history. This is after all historical fiction. The countries of the new world all have a past that should be acknowledged and atoned for when discussing them in high school history classes. These new world conquests wouldn’t be possible without committing genocide on the indigenous people and rebuilding the infrastructure with kidnapped slaves. Some people such as me have no problem acknowledging how shameful of a history we have. Others seem to be proud of it to the point where even today they deny the existence of racism in the modern era. For those on the latter side of the spectrum, I have one question for you. How do you expect to change the world into a better place when you keep repeating history’s ugliest features? Cimarronin isn’t just an action-packed fun-filled rollercoaster ride. It’s a look into the darkest parts of our past for those who probably need their eyelids braced open like Alex from “A Clockwork Orange”. Cimarronin is a quick and short read that packs a lot of action, drama, and history into that tiny space. A reader could probably blow through this thing in less than twenty-four hours. Is it over too soon? Maybe. Should there be other add-ons to this book? Absolutely. But for now, enjoy the ride while you can. Rollercoasters don’t last forever, you know. A passing grade goes to this deliciously violent and historically poignant piece of graphic fiction.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    Much like Neal Stephenson's much ballyhooed Kickstarter failure, Clang, the graphic novel Cimarronin is more interested in swordplay than story. That is, the narrative takes a back seat as Stephenson participates in what amounts to another masturbatory exercise in how much he loves pointy objects. Almost nothing in Cimarronin is cooked through to the center, whether its a surprise love interest that occurs at the eleventh hour with no prior warning or an entire page dedicated to discussing the p Much like Neal Stephenson's much ballyhooed Kickstarter failure, Clang, the graphic novel Cimarronin is more interested in swordplay than story. That is, the narrative takes a back seat as Stephenson participates in what amounts to another masturbatory exercise in how much he loves pointy objects. Almost nothing in Cimarronin is cooked through to the center, whether its a surprise love interest that occurs at the eleventh hour with no prior warning or an entire page dedicated to discussing the philosophy of Destreza swordplay that advances the plot exactly 0 percent. Everything is held together by a string and a prayer. From a technical standpoint, issues 1 through 3 are illustrated by the very excellent Robert Sammelin, while issues 4 through 6 are illustrated in a very different style by Dean Kotz. I'm not saying that Kotz is a bad artist, but going from Sammelin's hyper-real art to Kotz's less-refined linework was jarring to say the least. He simply wasn't the right talent for this project.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Michael Conway

    I received this book as a giveaway and while a samurai story is not necessarily something that I would be interested in, this being partially written/created by a science fiction writer intrigued me. The story, while somewhat interesting, was not fantastic. I just never felt fully engaged with the characters and I was never really sure who I was rooting for. Maybe a longer tale might have helped to correct some of these complaints. On the plus side, I really enjoyed the artwork and this helped f I received this book as a giveaway and while a samurai story is not necessarily something that I would be interested in, this being partially written/created by a science fiction writer intrigued me. The story, while somewhat interesting, was not fantastic. I just never felt fully engaged with the characters and I was never really sure who I was rooting for. Maybe a longer tale might have helped to correct some of these complaints. On the plus side, I really enjoyed the artwork and this helped for me to press on with the reading of this. Overall, I got some enjoyment out of this, but I just didn't love it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tres Herndon

    Interesting story about interesting times where many cultures were clashing. Suspect the tie to Foreworld but it hasn't been confirmed yet. Not a huge fan of the art style. Story is incomplete, to be followed up by Fall of the Cross, which is complete novel now. Will check that out, see if the story ends or if there's more. OK, read Fall of the Cross. I thought it was a little hard to track what was going on sometimes due to the art style, but it was a fun story set in an underused time & pla Interesting story about interesting times where many cultures were clashing. Suspect the tie to Foreworld but it hasn't been confirmed yet. Not a huge fan of the art style. Story is incomplete, to be followed up by Fall of the Cross, which is complete novel now. Will check that out, see if the story ends or if there's more. OK, read Fall of the Cross. I thought it was a little hard to track what was going on sometimes due to the art style, but it was a fun story set in an underused time & place. I suppose the mysterious priest was a sort of Shield Brother many centuries later than the Mongoliad.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Garrett

    This was great; it reminded me initially of the alt-fic histories in Savage Tales, Marvel's black-and-white, two-fisted adventure magazine from the 80s. The characters are at home with how expendable they are in the grand scheme of things, and the larger events unfolding tip on the lever points of seemingly minor players. In truth, there are no minor players. Pretty much the richness and brutality one would expect from a GN about a disgraced samurai (the ronin of the title) living in alternate r This was great; it reminded me initially of the alt-fic histories in Savage Tales, Marvel's black-and-white, two-fisted adventure magazine from the 80s. The characters are at home with how expendable they are in the grand scheme of things, and the larger events unfolding tip on the lever points of seemingly minor players. In truth, there are no minor players. Pretty much the richness and brutality one would expect from a GN about a disgraced samurai (the ronin of the title) living in alternate reality Spain. Graphically detailed, but comfortably read on my Kindle, and dense with personality.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tanvir Muntasim

    Cult science fiction writer Stephenson tries his hand at graphic novel writing and comes out with mixed results. While the setting is quite unique and any nerd fans dream, (A Samurai living in Manila and heading towards Mexico!), the art work is not the best and the frequent flashback is jarring, disrupting the flow of the story. A lot of research has gone into the story because of the writers' love for history and martial arts, but may be the media wasn't appropriate to reflect the depth of the Cult science fiction writer Stephenson tries his hand at graphic novel writing and comes out with mixed results. While the setting is quite unique and any nerd fans dream, (A Samurai living in Manila and heading towards Mexico!), the art work is not the best and the frequent flashback is jarring, disrupting the flow of the story. A lot of research has gone into the story because of the writers' love for history and martial arts, but may be the media wasn't appropriate to reflect the depth of their hard work. A missed opportunity, but I will wait ot see if the sequel benefits from experience.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    Not sure why this didn't work for me since I'm a huge fan of Samurai comics, historical fiction and what little of Neal Stephenson I've read (Snowcrash). Biggest complaint is the lack of continuity/flow from one panel to the next, many of which seemed completely unrelated to the panel before. There was more then a few times that I kept flipping back and forth between pages expecting that a few must have been stuck together so fractured was the storytelling.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Estephania

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Great looking art! The story is more mature and on the darker side, but I believe it's perfect for high school age and above. The reason I gave it a three star rating is that I was lost in the beginning. I love when stories begin in the middle of the action, but I was having a hard time understand who was important, their names, and the setting. The opening with suicide (accusation of suicide) was too fast, I as a reader don't care that he is suicidal if I don't know who he is yet.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kris

    It's an interesting concept - a Japanese ronin and a Spaniard Jesuit priest join up to smuggle a Chinese Manchu princess to Mexico City. But the dialog leaves it up to the artwork to tell a lot of the story, and the artwork is not up to the task. A plot full of twists and turns, and art that requires a scorecard to keep things straight, are not a good combination.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Gina

    I received this book as a First Read. The illustrations are overly involved. The story was disjointed and made huge leaps which created a lack of cohesion. It was hard to follow what was happening or why. The story needed more background and more dialogue to hold it together. A disappointing transition to graphic novels by Stephenson given his writing skill.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Moimma

    An interesting manga twist As a fan of Lone Wolf and Cub, I enjoyed both the artwork and the story of this tale set in early Mexico. It was interesting to see the interplay of characters from China, Japan, Spain, and the indigenous tribes as they battled for different objectives while keeping me entertained with the overall story. I think you will enjoy this tale.

  23. 5 out of 5

    David

    Interesting, but it didn't turn my world upside down. I expected a little more depth to the story, but it's fairly shallow. If you play the roleplaying games 7th Sea or Legend of the Five Rings, you may dig this.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lady Entropy

    I love Neal. But this book left me mostly indifferent, as it felt more an exploration of themes and ideas than a fully-written book. I just couldn't get immersed in it enough to care about any of the characters.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Furfle

    It's ok There are some interesting historical points to an otherwise average book. The artwork does capture the theme, but it's somewhat rushed

  26. 4 out of 5

    Alison

    Review on my blog here.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mischa Berger

  28. 4 out of 5

    Amari Bradshaw

  29. 4 out of 5

    Skelton Porter

  30. 4 out of 5

    Manatees Owlie

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