kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

ESV Study Bible, Premium Burgundy Cowhide Leather, By Crossway Books

Availability: Ready to download

Factory New, Expedited and Second Day shipping available


Compare
kode adsense disini

Factory New, Expedited and Second Day shipping available

30 review for ESV Study Bible, Premium Burgundy Cowhide Leather, By Crossway Books

  1. 5 out of 5

    Peter Krol

    I am not a big fan of study Bibles. In fact I'm not even a small fan. However, this one has blown me out of the water. Full-color maps right alongside the text highlighting the specific places mentioned in that passage, introductions to books that are somewhat concise and yet actually contain useful information, study notes that focus primarily on observing the text - I could go on and on. Last night I stayed up late reading my Bible. I haven't done that in ages, but it was totally worth it. Update I am not a big fan of study Bibles. In fact I'm not even a small fan. However, this one has blown me out of the water. Full-color maps right alongside the text highlighting the specific places mentioned in that passage, introductions to books that are somewhat concise and yet actually contain useful information, study notes that focus primarily on observing the text - I could go on and on. Last night I stayed up late reading my Bible. I haven't done that in ages, but it was totally worth it. Update: I haven't read every study note, but I just finished reading all of the articles. They were quite useful as short, scholarly, yet plainly-written introductions to key topics.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ethan Smith

    yeah boy, I just read the whole Bible for the first time!!!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Barry

    From time to time—usually when someone is thinking of buying a new Bible—people ask me to recommend a translation. So, here it is. The English Standard Version (ESV) has been my preferred Bible for preaching and personal Bible reading since its publication in 2001 because it is an “essentially literal” translation that seeks, as far as possible, to capture the precise wording of the original text while retaining the beauty and dignity of the Tyndale-King James legacy of English Bibles. Starting From time to time—usually when someone is thinking of buying a new Bible—people ask me to recommend a translation. So, here it is. The English Standard Version (ESV) has been my preferred Bible for preaching and personal Bible reading since its publication in 2001 because it is an “essentially literal” translation that seeks, as far as possible, to capture the precise wording of the original text while retaining the beauty and dignity of the Tyndale-King James legacy of English Bibles. Starting with the 1971 RSV text, a translation team of 95 evangelical biblical scholars carefully weighed each word and phrase against the original Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek, to ensure the fullest accuracy and clarity and to avoid under-translating or overlooking any nuance of the original text. By being as transparent as possible to the original text, the ESV lets the reader see as directly as possible the structure and meaning of the original words of scripture. Crossway Books has now published the ESV Study Bible, the most comprehensive study Bible ever published—with completely new notes, maps, illustrations, charts, timelines, articles, and other features. It contains more than 2 million words of Bible text and insightful explanation and teaching—equivalent to a 20-volume Bible resource library. The purchase of a print edition of an ESV Study Bible includes a registration code that gives you access to the ESV Online Study Bible. All the ESV text, notes, charts, timelines, maps, articles—all 2 million words—are then accessible via your web browser. I encourage you to find out more about the ESV at www.esv.org and the ESV Study Bible at www.esvstudybible.org.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    Well, I finished my "through the Bible in a year" plan for 2015 about two weeks early. I really enjoyed the ESV Study Bible, and will be using it for years to come. The challenging part for me this year was that I not only read the complete Scriptural text, but also every article and footnote. There are a LOT of study helps in this Bible! As far as my "rating" of 5 stars...this is the Word of God, so how could I give it any less? Read it, learn it, live it!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Holton

    As I prepare for this review I ask myself, “How in the world do you review a Bible?” I’m in a tough spot here because I can’t be neutral in my critique because I can’t criticize the author… That may not turn out well for me. So I have decided to touch on some of the highlights to the newest Study Bible from Crossway Books. The English Standard Study Bible is quite possibly one of the best study Bibles I own. Being a pastor myself, I have my fair share of study Bibles and this one wins hands down As I prepare for this review I ask myself, “How in the world do you review a Bible?” I’m in a tough spot here because I can’t be neutral in my critique because I can’t criticize the author… That may not turn out well for me. So I have decided to touch on some of the highlights to the newest Study Bible from Crossway Books. The English Standard Study Bible is quite possibly one of the best study Bibles I own. Being a pastor myself, I have my fair share of study Bibles and this one wins hands down. The ESV Study Bible has two things from the start that makes it a great resource. First, I think the English Standard Version is by far the best translation out on the market today. It is easy to read, literal and accurate. This translation was first published in 2001 with over 100 scholars and advisors working together who were committed to “historic Christian Orthodoxy”. Second, a group of 95 well respected scholars and teachers provided the study notes that are in depth and helpful to anyone ranging from pastors to a casual reader of the Bible. General editor is Wayne Grudem, Theology editor is J.I. Packer, O.T. Editor is John Collins and N.T. editor is Tomas R. Schreiner. Some of the primary features include nearly 20,000 notes, 80,000 cross references, 200 full color maps, 40 illustrations and over 2,500 pages. As you can imagine this Bible is a big book! The best feature I believe is the online ESV Study Bible that Bible owners can access for free. This makes it nice for when you travel and you don’t have the room for this Bible (did I mention it was big?) you can access the same Study Bible online. Of course you can purchase the hardcover version, Genuine or Bonded leather, or even premium Calfskin. Personally the ESV Study Bible has been a wonderful addition to my resource library. I have had it for a week already and it has been invaluable for my sermon preparations. I would HIGHLY recommend this Study Bible to all Pastors, church leaders and even lay people. So, if you are in the market for a new Bible or you would like to get a Bible filled with helpful resources and insights, then I would suggest you get yourself an ESV Study Bible. You will be glad you did. Reviewed by Jeff Holton

  6. 4 out of 5

    Heidi'sbooks

    The Positives of the ESV Study Bible The Maps! If you like maps, this is your Bible. Most Study Bibles have maps, especially in the back of the Book. But, this study Bible is map-paradise. There are maps in the back, but also in the front of each book placing the book in location. Not only that but there are maps in the study notes at the bottom of the page, and they are in color. So, if you are talking about a battle, in the notes there will be a map of the area and arrows showing the movement o The Positives of the ESV Study Bible The Maps! If you like maps, this is your Bible. Most Study Bibles have maps, especially in the back of the Book. But, this study Bible is map-paradise. There are maps in the back, but also in the front of each book placing the book in location. Not only that but there are maps in the study notes at the bottom of the page, and they are in color. So, if you are talking about a battle, in the notes there will be a map of the area and arrows showing the movement of each side. If there is a journey, a map will chart the course. The Charts! I'm a "chart-girl." At least my girlfriend used to call me that. There are charts, charts, charts: genealogies, charts of kings, charts of all the mentions of a word or phrase in a book (such as how many time The Spirit of the Lord is mentioned), charts of percentages, etc. The Historical/Archaeological Corroboration: Events are put into their historical setting. For example, the book of Nahum is a prophecy against the Assyrians, and the author names the rulers of Assyria with their dates of reign, the affliction they brought against Israel, and the significance historically. The study notes often list archaeological corroboration. For example, in I Kings 14:25-26 the note tells that "a monumental relief of the Bubastite Portal of the main temple of Amon...catalogs, town by town, Shishak's military incursion into Israel and Judah. The Karnak relief provides striking verification of the biblical account." The literary significance: At the beginning of each book there is a section titled "Literary Features." This section clearly talks about the genre of the book and some literary features employed by the author, holding each book up as some of the world's great literature. Possible Negatives: Each book of the Bible has a different author/s for the notes; some authors seem more conservative than others. (This is also one of this Study Bible's great strengths because dozens of theologians are writing in their area of specialization.) For example, there is a note in Genesis arguing that the flood did not have to be worldwide. Prophecy: Your view of future prophecy may differ. For example, the notes in the book of I Thessalonians do not use the term "Rapture" but instead the "Second Coming of Christ." However, the notes in Revelation do delineate the various viewpoints on end-time prophecy. There are diagrams/timelines showing future events from the various schools of interpretation including Dispensational Premillennialism, Historical Premillennialism, Preterists Schools, Idealist School, etc. Then there are more charts discussing various ideas on the Millennium. Overall I think this Study Bible is worth it for the maps and charts alone. The colored graphics for the Tabernacle, Solomon's Temple, and Herod's Temple (not to mention of the city of Jerusalem) are outstanding. Even if you disagree on the some of the comments on prophecy, this would be a great reference book to have on your shelf. I thought the notes were very helpful in linking events to their historical setting.

  7. 5 out of 5

    John

    I had high expectations for this Study Bible after seeing the list of contributors. I've been using it for a few years now, purchasing it shortly after it was first published. Unfortunately I was more disappointed than impressed. The ESV translation is what it is, like it or not. I like it and have been using it for many years now. The book introductions are pretty solid, but the real let down are the notes throughout each book. They simply weren't as helpful as I was hoping in so many places. Fe I had high expectations for this Study Bible after seeing the list of contributors. I've been using it for a few years now, purchasing it shortly after it was first published. Unfortunately I was more disappointed than impressed. The ESV translation is what it is, like it or not. I like it and have been using it for many years now. The book introductions are pretty solid, but the real let down are the notes throughout each book. They simply weren't as helpful as I was hoping in so many places. Few, if any of the notes deal with the hard passages. And when they do, there is little illumination. The editors seem to have taken a position to avoid taking firm positions on any area of disagreement, outside of the essentials. Overall the text notes are the greatest weakness in this study Bible. The articles at the end are helpful for the beginning theologian, but are more foundational than insightful. This is a solid study Bible, though I'm sure there are better ones out there. Five years later, I don't even use this Study Bible anymore.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rod

    This is the greatest book i've ever known. Endless resources. Now i'm waiting to view the Reformation Study Bible.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    I give this book my annual five-star rating, and I give Goodreads a hearty chuckle for listing the author as "anonymous."

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tim Stewart

    Best book ever

  11. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    New Testament: 1) Gospel of John - I always new that the Gospel of John was by far the most mystical of all the Gospel writings and thus something that I always feel the most inclined towards. In the Gospel of John, the idea of the trinity is broached in which three person in one God idea is unified. By extension, Jesus, in this Gospel shows his disciples unity toward God which in the end very mystical understanding of the Word of God. Also, something I find interesting in this Gospel and highly New Testament: 1) Gospel of John - I always new that the Gospel of John was by far the most mystical of all the Gospel writings and thus something that I always feel the most inclined towards. In the Gospel of John, the idea of the trinity is broached in which three person in one God idea is unified. By extension, Jesus, in this Gospel shows his disciples unity toward God which in the end very mystical understanding of the Word of God. Also, something I find interesting in this Gospel and highly suspect this is the singular importance of the Catholic holy Eucharist Communion. In the rite of the Eucharist, one shares in the wholeness of Jesus Christ and thus God as well as other members of Church from the beginning of time to the present in being One in God. So the Eucharist itself is the "communion" with the Divine as well as the communion of saint past, present, and future. The Gospel of John is unified under the word Love that unites all Christian to each other and to God. Now for the down side of mysticism, by its very nature mysticism deals with the spirit so it totally discards the real world as the hindrance to the spirit; thus to by unified to the God all the time one really has to leave the World and become a monk. I think this is what Catholic priest try to do when they adhere to a life of poverty, obedience, and chastity meaning they try to separate themselves from the world around them in order to serve God more fully. But something that is interesting about it is in it there is provocative nature within it that shows the twin forces of evangelicalization and religious zeal. There is also a healthy dose of predestination that can be seen in the Gospel of John in that people who understand the seemingly "forceful" words of God are the ones who were predestined to see it by the father. I think the idea of predestination is what shocks me the most in the Gospel of John. Also, other impressions is that Jesus did his "works" as an extension of who he is so to man should do his works as an extension of who he is. So basically, this gives credence to the whole Catholic notion of doing good works is as important as faith in God because one flows into the other as a continuum. Another thing that strikes me about the Gospel of John is the clash of man made institution such as the church and the spirit of God. In the Gospel of John, Caiphus the chief priest seeks to preserve the Jewish state, religion and churchly institution by killing Jesus Christ. Although we generally think of Caiphus as schemer bad guy, we have to remember that he was in charge of the Jewish religion as an institution thus to him preserving that institution at the expense of one man was a small price to pay. This again shows in my mind the dynamic tension between faith vs. intelligence and any man made institution vs individuality and his spirit. The Gospel of Mark The Gospel of Mark seems to be a laundry list of Jesus accomplishments almost in CV fashion. Although there is the shocking emphasis on not only the miracles that Jesus performed but also the exorcisms against "unclean spirit". Again and again Mark talks about Jesus casting out demons which seems to be where Catholicism rite of exorcism comes from. Again the Gospel of Mark emphasizes the separation of the ways of God from the ways of the Earth. I guess in a way this can be seen as the separation of the Church from the State. The Gospel of Mark also features the famous rendering of Cesar what is Cesar and to God what is God again confirming the separation of church and state. Also, there is an emphasis on being a servant leader in the Gospel of Mark in with numerous passage that emphasizes that the last will be first and the first will be last. There is also a passage in the Gospel of Mark that unites all Christian whatever domination they are in, in the passage that emphasizes that as long as the person does works in the name of Jesus Christ it does not matter that he is not part of the original 12. The Gospel of Matthew: It seems to me that the Gospel of Matthew is a more historically comprehensive account on the life of Jesus with a surprising emphasis in proclaiming the gospel solely to the Jews. Also, the Gospel of Matthew tends to be more practical in what to do should certain situation arise, like what I imagine the Jewish law books emphasize on the behavior of people in the Jewish faith. An addendum to its practicality is the emphasis of this Gospel in Parables as lessons to having faith. Jesus Christ came to fulfill the law because he is the living law of God other than that he disdain following the letter of the law for its own sake and thus interpreted the law as it relates to human beings in todays terms one can say that Jesus Christ was a judicial activist in his interpretation of the law as it relates to human beings not as something set in stone, which is more Pharisees interpretation of the law (strict constitutionist). Matthew disdains the Pharisees and "learned people of God's law" as people who are hypocrites and do not practice what they preach. Also, in the Gospel of Matthew one finds the scriptural establishment of the Pope via Peter. But, it also shows Peter being fallible in his quest to have Jesus not face his destiny as well as denying Jesus three times. Perhaps, the Gospel foretold the history of the Catholic Church that although it will be the first organized Church it is also subject to fallibility even the Pope since the central figure of the Gospels is Peter, the first Pope. Also, a striking lesson in this Gospel is the idea of fruits of ones labor as a sign to whether or not the person is a true disciple of not again this gives credence to the idea of faith through action is the ultimate way to show Christianity. Also, in chapter 19, there seems to be a reference to homosexuality as someone being born with instead of what is commonly known in Christianity of being made into with Christ reference of eunachs from birth. An interesting thing about the view of a soulmate in marriage is the idea that two people becoming one. Also, chapter 25 may have given the Christian textural foundation for capitalism in the Parable of the Talents. I wonder if this is where we get the present meaning of talents from? The Gospel of Luke: The Gospel of Luke is very similar to the Gospel of Matthew though it is even more thorough than Matthew's Gospel in recounting the life of Jesus Christ. I now understand Bushes comment of if you are not with us, you are against us has a very Synoptic Gospel ring to it. The Acts of the Apostles: The Acts of the Apostles tells of the acts of Jesus' disciples that after Pentecost when they received the burning fire of the Holy Spirit. I would imagine if one receives the Holy Spirit it would definitely be a life changing event. But reading the Acts of the Apostles, I am convinced that the only way one can truly follow in their footsteps is to be a monk in an order especially with their emphasis on communal living in which their are no personal possessions. The question is why in this present age does God not brand people with the fire of the Holy Spirit as ardently as He did back then? Perhaps, His goal now is more diffuse works of the Holy Spirit that allows people to live their God given talents in service to Him instead of creating in them this all consuming desire to spread the Word of God. The Acts also shows how faith especially as it turns to steal by the Grace of the Holy Spirit cannot be defeated because how can one defeat a Spirit? All the Spirit will do if you kill someone will go to another because in the it is a Spirit. Also, I now understand why people saw the early Christians as a threat because in the end they challenged the existing social order. For the Jews, Christianity meant challenging their scriptural interpretation that has been institutionalized in their Jewish faith. Likewise, for the Romans, the Christians challenged the established religion of the Emperor as god by stating that the Jesus Christ is the only Lord and Savior. Even though the Romans had other religions in their domain, Christianity was the only Religion that was spreading like wild-fire and was not bound by any geographical region or race like Judaism was. I suspect that Christianity as a religion reinforces the idea of Democracy because in Christianity all men are equal in the eyes of the Lord and in Democracy no matter how powerful you are your vote counts only once. Reading the Acts, I now understand how small revival Evangelical movement with the fire of the earlier Christians is good for the Christian church as a whole. It is similar to how start-up companies challenge the bigger corporations to continuously innovate. It is good that God used Saul who is learned man and turned him into Paul in order to preach to the Gentiles and Jews alike. The question is why does the Protestant Church revere Paul more than Peter as clearly Peter was the first according to the Acts to impart the power of the Holy Spirit in the Gentile nation? I know now why God chose Paul because not only was he a former prosecutor of Christians as well as a learned man who could debate with philosophers in the Greek Cities like Athens but he is also a Roman citizen and being a Roman citizen by birth he had freedom of movement without hindrance within the whole Roman empire thus allowing him to be the first missionary. He being a Jewish Roman citizen allowed him to be able to reach a wider audience than a Peter who was just a Jewish commoner. The rest of the Acts reads of Paul's trials by the Jewish nation. James: The book of James is a practical account on what to do in certain instances with the emphasis on actively practicing ones faith. For just as soul cannot do anything with the body so to is faith dead unless acted upon by doing good works. Peter 1: The 1 st letters of Peter tells Christians to live a Christian life with integrity which matches internal faith with external action. Also, he reiterates Jesus teaching to do good works as a Christian and if evildoers prosecute one because he is doing good works as a Christian then that much the better. Peter 2: The 2nd letter of Peter to the faithful actually proclaim that everything in the scriptures are inspired by God to the messenger via the Holy Spirit. Also, he warns the faithful of teachers who will use the scripture for their ends. He also warns people who have fallen away from the fire of God that it would have been better that they never heard the word of God than to turn from the teachings of God. In parable of the seeds, these are the seeds that fell in the rocks and thus did not grow. John 3 letters: John echoes his Gospel as Love as the greatest commandment as a sure sign that a person who profess to be a Christian is in fact a true Christian. From what I have read of the letters to the faithful, a true Christian can only come from a holy order. Since Christianity is a universal religion, one cannot have partisan loyalty to anything relating to the earth. That is one has to solely be loyal to Christ that is being a monk in a religious order. Jude: The letter of Jude warns the faithful of false teacher who use Christianity for their own sexual gratification and generally perversing Christian doctrine. Hebrew: The letters to the Hebrew explains how Jesus Christ is the most high priest and the creator of a new covenant. It also explains why JC death washed the sins of the world away. Apparently, in Jewish religion the chief priest used to do animal sacrifices in order to wash his and other people's sins away annually. When Jesus Christ died for our sins in essence he took the place of the animal sacrifices and since he is God then it was a price that washes away all humanities since for eternity. Hebrew extols faith in JC for the reason that he was the sacrificial lamb that allowed everyone else to live. I think this is where the Protestant's saying of believe in JC will save you. Romans: Paul's letter to the Romans is the quintessential Protestant text that extols faith over works. But on closer examination, Paul was arguing for faith in Jesus Christ instead of the older covenant of the following blindly the Jewish laws without faith which is highly consistent with the Gospel stories where Jesus Christ did works on the Sabbath to show that the law without faith in God is not good enough. The letter's to the Roman's also has condemnation of homosexuality as immoral and no doubt as the Roman's practiced it, it was probably immoral. Paul's letters shows him to be similar to a stereotypical evangelical/fundamentalist preacher of today who while preaching brotherly love to fellow Christian's seems to be condemning to hell those who are not of the faith. Interestingly enough, he admits to his zealousness as a possible weakness as his early defending of the law against Christians. He states that the Law is good because he is human his righteous indignation was a sin that blinded him from seeing God's will. I wonder if this is one of the reasons for his being recruited by Jesus Christ because Paul could serve as a doctrinary enforcer of Jesus Christ. I would describe the Epistles as a kin to Supreme Court Justices opinions to the Constitution (Gospel of the Life of Jesus Christ). Too bad that the majority of the Epistles writings are made by Paul and thus only one opinion of the early church of Christ. I would have liked to see other opinions in how Jesus Christ Church and teachings were like. Galatians: Paul's letter to the Galatians is the famous quotes that Protestant's love to quote that it is through faith and not works that we are justified in Christ. The real reading of the letter is as follows, " a person is not justified by works of the LAW but through faith in Jesus Christ, so we also have believed in Christ Jesus in order to be justified by faith in Christ and not by works of the LAW, by because by works of the LAW no one will be justified. Paul is clearly talking about the division that some people were sowing in the early church between Gentiles and Jewish converts to Christianity and I do not think it can be expounded to present day. That is, Paul's argument is consistent with Jesus Gospel teachings whereas Protestant interpretation of Paul's Galatians teaching is not consistent with the Gospel especially in the Lord's saying of good vs bad tree bearing fruit. Ephesians: Paul's letter to the Ephesians again reiterates the unity of Christians over the superficial divisions of being Gentiles and Jews via the Grace of God through the Faith of the believers. Like Romans, he again uses an imagery that I like of we are many parts of one body in Christ and we have to use our God given talents in order to make the whole work together. The Ephesians is also famous for how husbands, wives, children, and fathers should behave to each other. And an outdated point of view, how slaves and masters should behave toward each other too. Philippians: Paul's letter to the Philippians raises Christianity as a cause worth dying for as Paul was too eager to do in order to live with Jesus Christ. He pleads to the Christians to be united in Christ against the world and temptations of the flesh in all its manifestations. Colossians: Paul's letter to the Colossians tells unequivocally says that Jesus Christ is God. He again warns Christians of superficial divisions such as rituals, dietary restrictions as a non-entity in the eyes of God. He also again asks Christian to focus solely on Christ to the exclusion of all that is of this world. No wonder, evangelicals love Paul because he clearly is for a Christian mega church in which the pastor can be a regular guy who is filled with the Holy Spirit and preaches to all leaving behind all rituals, festival, and dietary restrictions in favor of focusing on the Word of God. 1 Thessalonians: Again, Paul extols the virtues of Christ-centered living over pleasures of the flesh. Adds the virtues with warning of the impending coming of Lord in which we have no idea when that will be. 2 Thessalonians: In this letter, the famous Protestant work ethic is exalted in which Paul encourages people to earn their daily bread and discourage idleness. 1 Timothy: Paul tells Timothy that he must lead the Christian church their by example and for the rich to share. He warns that people must not lust after riches but rather they should share their riches by Christianly giving. He also warns Timothy of "knowledgeable" people who because of their knowledge turn away from the faith. He states that the law is laid for the "lawless, disobediant, for the ungodly and sinners, for the unholy and the profane which he includes homosexuality in these ranks. He is basically advocating a Christian communism society in which Christians keep each other in check via a morality police. 2 Timothy: Paul again tells Timothy that "God who saved us and called us to a holy calling, not because of our works but because of his own purpose and grace..." I keep thinking that what Paul actually means when he says this is although everything starts with faith in God it should be followed up by works as the "fruit" of his faith. It is interesting that again he tells Timothy to avoid any talk that is not Christ-centered because such talk creates division. His fundamentalist teaching in trying to keep unity in the early Christian Church is today misinterpreted by people as anything outside Christian subject is bad. But you have to hand it to Paul, he not only runs a tight ship but he also is willing to die for his cause. Titus: Paul's letter to Titus shows him as a strident doctrinarian fundamentalist who extols the virtue of a 1950's household but his fundamentalism shows itself in the fact that he does not like dissent and tells Titus to shun people who think differently from the group. Philemon: Although it was common in the ancient world to have slaves, Paul at least acknowledges that slaves and masters in the eyes of God are the same and should be treated as such in the church. I think this the reason Christianity and democracy go together because Christianity teaches that everyone in the eyes of God is equal. 1 Corinthians: The passage which I really like in 1 Corinthians deals with the fact that we are many parts but we are all one body in Christ. Again Paul shows both his exuberant spiritual evangelical side as well as his dogmatic unilateral fundamentalist side. Although I agree that the Christian church should be a beacon of purity to the whole world, I disagree with his judgmental thoughts of what is right while others are wrong. Although in some ways his obsession with order is good, it can also be suffocating. Paul for me has an aura of let us all unite in Christ as long as you do it my way. In this letters, Paul rails against sexual immorality no surprise there, and he states that if people can be chaste for the Lord it is better (read: I think this is the reason why Priest and nuns are celibate)because he rightly states that having a family takes away energy from the focus on spreading the gospel. 1 Corinthians also has the famous meaning of Love passage. 2 Corinthians: Paul's second letter to the Corinthians deals with the split in the earlier Church regarding dogma. Paul wants the Corinthians to follow his dogma about Christ by showing them that he is holier than thou. h

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    There is no other “book” that is living, breathing, active. No other book that matters the same way as these words from my Heavenly Father. This is the one book I will reread over and over again.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    I choose to believe that these ancient texts are exactly what they claim to be, and I conform my breath to every encouragement and commandment. I read this book once a year.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    This Bible is the nicest Bible I have ever owned (yes, I have the calfskin). It is also loaded with scholarly notes and articles written by an all-star cast of theologians. I am very impressed with it. At 2,752 pages it is said to be equivalent to a 20-volume Bible resource library all in one volume. It is endorsed by men like: Randy Alcorn, Jerry Bridges, Mark Dever, Lig Duncan, Albert Mohler, J.I. Packer, and John Piper. But what's best about it can be found in all Bibles. The gospel is contai This Bible is the nicest Bible I have ever owned (yes, I have the calfskin). It is also loaded with scholarly notes and articles written by an all-star cast of theologians. I am very impressed with it. At 2,752 pages it is said to be equivalent to a 20-volume Bible resource library all in one volume. It is endorsed by men like: Randy Alcorn, Jerry Bridges, Mark Dever, Lig Duncan, Albert Mohler, J.I. Packer, and John Piper. But what's best about it can be found in all Bibles. The gospel is contained inside. The announcement from God that we do not have to keep doing a bunch of "things" anymore in order to merit God's love or approval, God in Christ has already done it for us. Here's some blurbs from the publisher: Description: The ESV Study Bible was created to help people understand the Bible in a deeper way—to understand the timeless truth of God’s Word as a powerful, compelling, life-changing reality. To accomplish this, the ESV Study Bible combines the best and most recent evangelical Christian scholarship with the highly regarded ESV Bible text. The result is the most comprehensive study Bible ever published—with more than 2,750 pages of extensive, accessible Bible resources. With completely new notes, maps, illustrations, charts, timelines, and articles, the ESV Study Bible was created by an outstanding team of 95 evangelical Christian scholars and teachers. In addition to the 757,000 words of the ESV Bible itself, the notes and resources of the ESV Study Bible comprise an additional 1.1 million words of insightful explanation and teaching. Primary Features * 2,752 pages—equivalent to a 20-volume Bible resource library all in one volume. * 1.1 million words—written by 95 leading evangelical scholars and teachers. * 19,500 notes—focusing especially on understanding the Bible text and providing answers to frequently raised issues. * Over 50 articles—including articles on the Bible’s authority, reliability, and interpretation; on biblical archaeology, theology, worship, prayer, and personal application. * Over 200 full-color maps—created with the latest digital technology, satellite images, and archaeological research; printed in full color, throughout the Bible. * 200-plus charts—offering key insights and in-depth analysis in clear, concise outline form; located throughout the Bible. * 80,000 cross-references—to encourage easy location of important words, passages, and biblical themes. * More than 40 new full-color illustrations—including historically accurate reconstructions of the Tabernacle, the Ark of the Covenant, Solomon’s temple, Herod’s temple, the city of Jerusalem in Jesus’ time and throughout the history of Israel, and many more. OVERVIEW OF CONTENT AND FEATURES The ESV Study Bible includes more than 19,500 notes, written specifically for the ESV Study Bible. These notes focus especially on understanding the meaning of the text, giving answers to frequently raised questions, and providing theological, historical, and archaeological background—all for the purpose of helping readers to understand the Bible in a deeper way. The ESV Study Bible also provides a wealth of additional resources. Thus the introductions to each book include essential information about the author, date, and place of writing; an extensive chart of key themes; a summary of how the book fits in with the rest of the biblical storyline; a description of literary features; an outline of the book; and a large full-color map showing the setting of the book. Another unique feature is the inclusion of over 50 helpful articles on topics such as the authority and truthfulness of the Bible, reading the Bible for application, the Bible in worship and prayer, the reliability of the biblical manuscripts, the relationship between archaeology and the Bible, an overview of biblical theology, and many more. Other key resources include a system of 80,000 cross references and a concordance (which together facilitate easy location of important words, passages, and biblical themes). In addition, over 200 color charts, located throughout the Bible, provide clear, concise presentations of essential information.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    Maybe not quite as flowing & beautifully worded as the KJV, but I do really appreciate the editors' attempts to keep the language as close as possible to the original texts, & to not fill in uncertain or debated words & passages with assumed verbiage. I haven't really gone in depth into the study part of this Bible, but I feel very assured that the text of Scripture itself will be edifying to any who take the time to read & apply it.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Admittedly I've still not read all of this Bible's copious notes and articles and I plan to spend many years doing just that. Which is why I love this bible. Full color maps, thoughtful articles and footnotes plus a well translated text make this particular Bible the one I am likely to use as my primary bible for study and devotional for years to come.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Dkovlak

    This is the best book ever written. I have read it for many years and hope to continue reading it for many more years. It is history, poetry, and a life guide all in one. It is "inspired by God and is profitable for teaching, correction, reproof, and training in righteousness, that the man of God may be competent, equipped for every good work." 2 Tim 3:16-17. I highly recommend it!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Wirsing

    I work at a Christian bookstore and whenever someone asks for a Bible this is usually he first one I recommend. Great notes and articles with solid theology that actually lines up with Scripture. I use it for my Bible classes at my college. One of my main study Bibles.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Bill Tillman

    What a wonderful study Bible! It's amazing how much can be packed into a single volume. Colorful maps and images let you see what is being described. Enough commentary for the Bible nerd. Don't miss this one!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Gabby

    The Bible is AMAZING !!! it changed my life and filled an empty place in my heart, in other words, I feel like a new person! read this, and you will find yourself changing from the inside out, In a very good way! May God bless your day :)

  21. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    Reading the Bible in 90 days was a challenge from my church. It's amazing to me that no matter how many times I've read it, God has revealed something new to me each time. I plan to read it again, but at a slower pace.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    The best study bible out there. Read it!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Wanda Fuentes

    I will always prefer the new international version. But this is the version I actually read from cover to cover... from Genesis straight through to Revelation.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Josh Dockter

    Truly inspired.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Chad Jowers

    Jesus pooped too!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    I'd like to think I'll read through it more quickly next time...

  27. 4 out of 5

    Caroline Kraft

    I'm always reading this. :)

  28. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    The best study notes of any Bible I've ever had!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Dale

    Still the best book - God's love letter written to us, full of wisdom and truth.

  30. 4 out of 5

    William Puddy

    The ESV reads as easily as does the RSV (which was the first translation I ever read completely), upon which this version is based. It is a product of the post modern era with tone and words familiar to those speaking or studying English today. I have now read six different translations (RSV, NASB, NIV, NKJV, 1599 Geneva, and ESV) completely. I remain steadfast in my preference for the NASB (most accurate literal translation from original sources into modern English), NIV (most accurate translat The ESV reads as easily as does the RSV (which was the first translation I ever read completely), upon which this version is based. It is a product of the post modern era with tone and words familiar to those speaking or studying English today. I have now read six different translations (RSV, NASB, NIV, NKJV, 1599 Geneva, and ESV) completely. I remain steadfast in my preference for the NASB (most accurate literal translation from original sources into modern English), NIV (most accurate translation of the meaning of the passages into English) [Note: the NASB/ NIV parallel Bible is what I use the most for the aforementioned reasons], and the 1599 Geneva (first Bible translated directly from the original Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek {which are the inspired Word} into Shakespearean English by the Reformers {with their notes}).

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.