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El Cuento De Ferdinando / The Story Of Ferdinand (Live Oak Readalong) (Spanish Edition)

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Ferdinand, the peaceful bull who loves to sit and smell flowers, is mistakenly carted off to a bullfight in Madrid, where he is believed to be the fiercest bull around. Ferdinand trots into the ring, only to sit and smell the flowers in the ladies' hair. No matter what the frustrated matador and his helpers do, they cannot get Ferdinand to fight. Lawson's memorable black-a Ferdinand, the peaceful bull who loves to sit and smell flowers, is mistakenly carted off to a bullfight in Madrid, where he is believed to be the fiercest bull around. Ferdinand trots into the ring, only to sit and smell the flowers in the ladies' hair. No matter what the frustrated matador and his helpers do, they cannot get Ferdinand to fight. Lawson's memorable black-and-white pictures speak volumes in this childhood classic.


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Ferdinand, the peaceful bull who loves to sit and smell flowers, is mistakenly carted off to a bullfight in Madrid, where he is believed to be the fiercest bull around. Ferdinand trots into the ring, only to sit and smell the flowers in the ladies' hair. No matter what the frustrated matador and his helpers do, they cannot get Ferdinand to fight. Lawson's memorable black-a Ferdinand, the peaceful bull who loves to sit and smell flowers, is mistakenly carted off to a bullfight in Madrid, where he is believed to be the fiercest bull around. Ferdinand trots into the ring, only to sit and smell the flowers in the ladies' hair. No matter what the frustrated matador and his helpers do, they cannot get Ferdinand to fight. Lawson's memorable black-and-white pictures speak volumes in this childhood classic.

30 review for El Cuento De Ferdinando / The Story Of Ferdinand (Live Oak Readalong) (Spanish Edition)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    I'm not an impartial judge of this book. I'm assuming all of you know the story. It's about a bull that doesn't want to bullfight like the other bulls. He just wants to sit and smell flowers in the field. My mom used to read it to me when I was a kid. She used to call me her little Ferdinand, because all the other little boys wanted to run around and roughhouse. And I didn't. I just wanted to sit and read and think. I'm not an impartial judge of this book. But I'm fond of it. And when a book's b I'm not an impartial judge of this book. I'm assuming all of you know the story. It's about a bull that doesn't want to bullfight like the other bulls. He just wants to sit and smell flowers in the field. My mom used to read it to me when I was a kid. She used to call me her little Ferdinand, because all the other little boys wanted to run around and roughhouse. And I didn't. I just wanted to sit and read and think. I'm not an impartial judge of this book. But I'm fond of it. And when a book's been around for 70 years, there's usually a reason for it.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    The Story of Ferdinand, Munro Leaf The Story of Ferdinand (1936) is the best known work written by American author Munro Leaf and illustrated by Robert Lawson. The children's book tells the story of a bull who would rather smell flowers than fight in bullfights. He sits in the middle of the bull ring failing to take heed of any of the provocations of the matador and others to fight. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: دوم ماه ژانویه سال 2006 میلادی عنوان: اما فردیناند این کار را نکرد؛ نویسنده: مونرو لیف ؛ مترجم: ط The Story of Ferdinand, Munro Leaf The Story of Ferdinand (1936) is the best known work written by American author Munro Leaf and illustrated by Robert Lawson. The children's book tells the story of a bull who would rather smell flowers than fight in bullfights. He sits in the middle of the bull ring failing to take heed of any of the provocations of the matador and others to fight. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: دوم ماه ژانویه سال 2006 میلادی عنوان: اما فردیناند این کار را نکرد؛ نویسنده: مونرو لیف ؛ مترجم: طاهره آدینه پور؛ ویراستار: مرتضی خسرونژاد؛ تهران، شرکت انتشارات علمی و فرهنگی؛ چاپ اول 1383، در 72 ص؛ مصور؛ شابک: 9644454790 ؛ موضوع: داستانهای حیوانات برای گروه سنی ب و ج سده 20 م گوساله کوچکی به نام فردیناند، با گله ای از گاوها در اسپانیا زندگی میکند. فردیناند برخلاف دیگر گوساله ها که دوست دارند شاخهاشان را به هم بکوبند و سمهاشان را بر زمین بکشند، دوست دارد در جایی کاملاٌ آرام بنشیند، و گل‌ها را بو کند. روزی از روزها بر حسب اتفاق، توسط عده ای گاوباز برای مسابقه ی گاوبازی به مادرید برده می‌شود. اما در زمین مسابقه، به جای خشونت و شاخ کوبیدن، آرام می‌نشیند و... ؛ داستان «اما فردیناند این کار را نکرد»، پیام صلح و دوستی برای خوانشگر کمسال خویش دارد. نویسنده کوشش کرده، تا روحیه ی صلح طلبی، و آرامش را در داستانی از زبان حیوانات به خوانشگر برساند. مونرو لیف، ژرف بینانه شخصیت اصلی داستان خویش را، گاو انتخاب کرده، آنهم گاوی اسپانیایی، که دارای شهرت، قدرت و خشونتی جهانی ست. در جایی که گاوها برای خشونت، و سرگرمی گاوبازها تربیت میشوند، گاوی وجود دارد، که عاشق طبیعت، و زیبایی ست. داستان نشان می‌دهد، که صلح و آرامش را می‌توان، در هر مکان، و زمانی، به دست آورد. متن داستان روان، و درکش بسیار آسان است. تصاویر کتاب در راستای متن حرکت میکنند، و با وجود اینکه تک رنگ (سیاه وسفید) هستند، چیزی از جذابیتشان کاسته نشده، و فضای تصاویر با فضای متن داستان، کاملا همخوانی دارد. داستان فردیناند، یک داستان چند لایه است، که در زیر پوسته ی ظاهر، می‌توان داستان انسانهایی را دید، که عاشق طبیعت و زیبایی هستند. انسان‌هایی که به دور از دغدغه ی مد، یا عرف‌های فرهنگی، و اجتماعی، به زندگی خود ادامه میدهند، و آنگونه که می‌خواهند زندگی میکنند. ا. شربیانی

  3. 4 out of 5

    da AL

    Lovely, lovely book. Sweet story -- plus bonus magical illustrations of romanticized Spain of yore to delight all.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Brian Yahn

    The mood and tone of this story are both spot on. And even though Ferdinand is easy to love, and even though the beginning is cute and entrancing, overall, the story is just pretty okay. It's about a bull who doesn't want to fight like all the others, because he'd rather just relax and smell flowers. Can you blame him? No. But there's really not much more to the story than that.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jon(athan) Nakapalau

    I enjoyed this book on several levels: a wonderful book about being yourself for children - but also a subconscious commentary on fascist Spain - a bull with a big heart picked to be slaughtered at the Blood Wedding of Franco and fed to his guests - my interpretation.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    Many of the kids books I've been revisiting are filled with specific, vivid memories of my childhood that are almost narratives unto themselves. Reading them transports me back to those (probably apocryphal) moments in my brain, leaving me full of a sort of joyful melancholy for things past and a hunger for more of those memories, a desire to relive all those locked up personal stories, so I grab another book I have always loved and devour it looking for more. I didn't find those memories in The Many of the kids books I've been revisiting are filled with specific, vivid memories of my childhood that are almost narratives unto themselves. Reading them transports me back to those (probably apocryphal) moments in my brain, leaving me full of a sort of joyful melancholy for things past and a hunger for more of those memories, a desire to relive all those locked up personal stories, so I grab another book I have always loved and devour it looking for more. I didn't find those memories in The Story of Ferdinand, but I may have found something more precious. I found that this story, with its beautiful illustrations and its little bull turned big bull who just wants to live peacefully and smell his flowers, made me think about people I care about rather than remembering some synapsy tale of them. It made me think of my mother, Chris. I always called her "Chris," which drove my father crazy because of how "disrespectful" it was. I thought of Chris and guessed that she probably read this book to me first. And I thought of how every book I touch and word I write is her gift to me, for teaching me too read, then teaching me to challenge myself with books that were "inappropriate," then sharing our reading when we were older. It made me think of my cousin, Fred, who I called Ferdinand behind his back. I thought of his moustache and 80s hair. I thought of how we both had brutally abusive fathers, but have never talked about it, even now, so many years after escaping their fists. It made me think of K.I. Hope, and how the anger of her writing -- that wonderful, necessary, emotional, ethical rage -- would cringe at the other bulls, Ferdinand's friends and family, showing off in the hopes of travelling to Madrid to be slaughtered in the bullfights. I thought of what a true friend she is and how unlikely it is to find a genuine friend on something like this social media platform, and how I have found so many. It made me think of Brontë and Miloš and Scoutie, and how much they love The Story of Ferdinand, and how Miloš is always trying to mimic the light Spanish accent I use to read them the book aloud, and how Brontë loves the art, and how Scoutie babbles the story back to me with her incomprehensible toddler language, punctuated by a "Ferdie-and" or "cow." And it made me think of Munroe Leaf. She and all the other authors I've had a relationship over my life. They have been my best friends. And each book that I love ... it's a gift written by them just for me. Thanks, Munroe. I love you too.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Anze

    "This is the story of Ferdinand - a little bull who would rather sit and smell flowers than fight in the bullring." This book truly is a gem. While I had heard about this work before, this is the first time that I have read it and I absolutely love it. Originally published in 1936, this work has been translated into more than 60 languages and has rarely been out of print. As this title is well known, I want to talk about its background. Its a hefty one. While Munro Leaf is an American author beca "This is the story of Ferdinand - a little bull who would rather sit and smell flowers than fight in the bullring." This book truly is a gem. While I had heard about this work before, this is the first time that I have read it and I absolutely love it. Originally published in 1936, this work has been translated into more than 60 languages and has rarely been out of print. As this title is well known, I want to talk about its background. Its a hefty one. While Munro Leaf is an American author because of the timing, setting and main character, this work is thought to have a political agenda. The book was published shortly before the Spanish Civil War. Described by some as subversive with a pacifist view (which challenged the facism that currenlty predominated Europe), "Ferdinand" was banned in many countries including Spain and Germany. Hitler is quoted as describing the book as "degenerate democratic propaganda". Franco was not a fan of the book either (the book was not available in Spain til after Franco's death). Its no surprise that the book was loved by Ghandi and Franklin & Eleanor Roosevelt, among other important figures. When asked Munro denied any political ties saying "its a happy-ending book about being yourself". In fact, it is alleged that this work was written in 40 minutes on a whim to be give Robert Lawson an opportunity to illustrate. The illustrations are marvelous, by the way. Whatever your personal take away from the book, its impossible to deny its impact. Mine? I just adore this gentle and kind bull and love the message of the book. Its a sweet and charming work for people of all ages. This is my final book for 2017 and it was a good one. P.S.: I an really looking forward to watching the animated movie version. 15/01/18 EDIT: Saw the movie this past weekend and absolutely loved it. While there was a story added, it kept the essence of the book. It is a perfect compliment to the original.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    It could be said this has been on my TBR list since childhood. I don't remember reading it then, and don't remember reading it to my daughter. Although I've known the story of the "little bull with a gentle heart who turned into a big bull with a gentle heart" for quite some time, I'd never picked up a copy until now. Lovely little story, which shook the world one might say. It was banned in Spain during the Spanish Civil War since it was seen as a "pacifist" book. (Oh, the horror!) It was banned It could be said this has been on my TBR list since childhood. I don't remember reading it then, and don't remember reading it to my daughter. Although I've known the story of the "little bull with a gentle heart who turned into a big bull with a gentle heart" for quite some time, I'd never picked up a copy until now. Lovely little story, which shook the world one might say. It was banned in Spain during the Spanish Civil War since it was seen as a "pacifist" book. (Oh, the horror!) It was banned in Nazi Germany (by none other than Little Adolf) for being "degenerate democratic propaganda." We better watch out, girls and boys, if The Trumpet ever learns to read! How can you rate it less than 5 glorious stars when you know that it made Franco and Hitler shake in their tiny little boots, just at the thought of it? (And for what it's worth, it's a great little book for children too!)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kandace

    I was always curious why my school library had multiple copies of "The Story of Ferdinand." Until now. Upon scanning some of the other reviews I feel left out because Ferdinand was not part of my collection growing up. I was blown away by the simple story of a gentle bull named Ferdinand, content with his life in the Spanish countryside. When it is time to choose a strong and tough bull to fight in Madrid, Ferdinand does not care and would rather smell flowers under his favorite cork tree. Ferdi I was always curious why my school library had multiple copies of "The Story of Ferdinand." Until now. Upon scanning some of the other reviews I feel left out because Ferdinand was not part of my collection growing up. I was blown away by the simple story of a gentle bull named Ferdinand, content with his life in the Spanish countryside. When it is time to choose a strong and tough bull to fight in Madrid, Ferdinand does not care and would rather smell flowers under his favorite cork tree. Ferdinand is stung by a bee and in his natural reaction of snorting and butting, he is mistaken by the city men as a suitable candidate for the bull fight and they take him away. What will happen to Ferdinand when they reach the ring? Will he turn into a rough and tough competitor as expected? Or will he remain true to his mild, contemplative nature? Published over 70 years ago, the straightforward significance of this story is clear. Along with the rich and uncomplicated black and white drawings of Robert Lawson, Munro Leaf captures the essence of attaining happiness. Stereotyped expectations can be avoided by remaining true to oneself. Readers of all ages can identify with the notion that being different doesn’t make it wrong. Sometimes it’s the small things in life that make us the most happy. Ferdinand proves this true when he attains bliss by simply sitting and smelling the flowers.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nikki

    This is, without a doubt, my absolute FAVORITE book from childhood. I remember my mother reading this to me as a small child, and having to fight back the tears, the story touched me so deeply. I found significance in the extreme simplicity of the words and illustrations. I was impressed with Ferdinand's gentle, yet strong, nature. He stood firm against the strongest pressures and remained constant. I like to analyze this book on many levels. On a side note (and dork moment): my husband holds th This is, without a doubt, my absolute FAVORITE book from childhood. I remember my mother reading this to me as a small child, and having to fight back the tears, the story touched me so deeply. I found significance in the extreme simplicity of the words and illustrations. I was impressed with Ferdinand's gentle, yet strong, nature. He stood firm against the strongest pressures and remained constant. I like to analyze this book on many levels. On a side note (and dork moment): my husband holds the same valuable characteristics I have always cherished in Ferdinand. I think I fell in love with Ferdinand as a child and as an adult found him realized and embodied in my husband.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Plethora

    I celebrated the Freedom to Read for the 2013 ALA Banned Book Week by reading this selection. Yes, it is a short children's picture book, but I was knee deep in other reads this year. So why was this book banned you ask? This book was originally published in 1936. Some saw the material as fascist, socialistic, pacifist or communistic. Munro Leaf, an American writer, had chosen to set this book in Spain. Well, history will tell us in 1936 the Spanish Civil War began a few months after publication I celebrated the Freedom to Read for the 2013 ALA Banned Book Week by reading this selection. Yes, it is a short children's picture book, but I was knee deep in other reads this year. So why was this book banned you ask? This book was originally published in 1936. Some saw the material as fascist, socialistic, pacifist or communistic. Munro Leaf, an American writer, had chosen to set this book in Spain. Well, history will tell us in 1936 the Spanish Civil War began a few months after publication. Hitler's Third Reich was already in power in Germany. The leader of the Spanish Nationalist, General Francisco Franco and his supporters saw the book as being pacifist, so it was banned. Hitler called it degenerate propaganda and had it burned, he also supported Franco's Nationalist movement. What exactly is this book about? Being that is a short read I won't give away too much, but Ferdinand is young bull. He doesn't wish to partake in the rough horseplay that his brothers do all day. He would rather sit under a cork tree and enjoy life. Be sure to enjoy the illustrations in the book, as they are fairly accurate for the area. Munro Leaf actually wrote this book for his friend Robert Lawson to illustrate. Lawson was in need of somewhere to showcase his work. See slightly reworded review on my blog.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Krista Stevens

    I had read it before - but revisited it recently. What I loved most this time is the controversy that swirled around the book - I had no idea. Lots of readers like this for the non-violence, peace choosing theme, but that message doesn't seem accurate. I like that Ferdinand chooses to do what he loves - he doesn't judge,criticize nor disparage the other bulls who want to fight- he just wants to smell flowers. The stronger message for me is to find what makes you happy and do that regardless of w I had read it before - but revisited it recently. What I loved most this time is the controversy that swirled around the book - I had no idea. Lots of readers like this for the non-violence, peace choosing theme, but that message doesn't seem accurate. I like that Ferdinand chooses to do what he loves - he doesn't judge,criticize nor disparage the other bulls who want to fight- he just wants to smell flowers. The stronger message for me is to find what makes you happy and do that regardless of what others (society) tells you. Ferdinand's mom doesn't receive a lot of press, which is too bad, as she should be a model for parents everywhere. She worries about Ferdinand when he is young as he is always off by himself and she was concerned that he would be lonesome. He explains to her that what he is doing is making him happy and - she listens. Wow. Then the best line in the book as far as I'm concerned is "His mother saw that he was not lonesome, and because she was an understanding mother, even though she was a cow, she let him just sit there and be happy." You go mom. Finally, once I really started looking at Robert Lawson's illustrations with lots of help from the internet - I was blown away. The historical timeframe of this book, published just as World War II is ramping up, also intrigued me. That, in and of itself, was fascinating. A little book - a lot of punch.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ahmed H. Mansour

    A classic children's story that even for a grown man like me means a lot, even though I`m not as strong as a bull, I believe that Ferdinand looks like me when I was a little boy :) A classic children's story that even for a grown man like me means a lot, even though I`m not as strong as a bull, I believe that Ferdinand looks like me when I was a little boy :)

  14. 5 out of 5

    Krista Regester

    Awe Ferdinand is such a cutie pie!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Darcy

    Very emotional--I cried the whole time and refused to even accept my pacifier. Why should I be pacified when poor Ferdinand, our peace-loving protagonist, is dragged to Madrid against his will to participate in a bullfight before a mob eager for bloodshed and violence??! Satisfying ending, though. I immediately settled down for a nap. -M

  16. 5 out of 5

    Marquise

    Where was this little gem when I was young? Hard not to cast my childhood as poorer in hindsight seeing how many great children's literature I missed back then. Well, better late than never! Nobody said "grown-up kids" can't read this book and enjoy it as well..

  17. 4 out of 5

    Gloria

    The best children's book-- ever.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    Ferdinand the Bull is not like the other young bulls. He doesn't like to run, jump and butt heads with the other calves. He likes to sit under his favorite tree and smell the flowers. His mother doesn't mind as long as he's happy. One day men show up to choose the fiercest, scariest, strongest bull to fight in the big bullfight in Madrid, Spain. All of the other bulls ran, jumped and charged to show the men how fierce and strong they were. But it is Ferdinand who is chosen after being stung by a Ferdinand the Bull is not like the other young bulls. He doesn't like to run, jump and butt heads with the other calves. He likes to sit under his favorite tree and smell the flowers. His mother doesn't mind as long as he's happy. One day men show up to choose the fiercest, scariest, strongest bull to fight in the big bullfight in Madrid, Spain. All of the other bulls ran, jumped and charged to show the men how fierce and strong they were. But it is Ferdinand who is chosen after being stung by a bee and flying through the air, running, snorting and pawing the ground. Ferdinand is taken to the big bullring in Madrid. Many people are there along with many ladies with beautiful flowers in their hair. The Matador, Banderilleros and the Picadores all march into the ring, holding their spears and posturing. All are excited to see the bull get gored and blooded and finally die. When the gates are opened to let the bull in, Ferdinand runs out, excited to be in such a grand place. The Matador, Banderilleros and Picadores were terrified that the bull was going to come after them immediately. Ferdinand ran to the middle of the ring, sat down and proceeded to enjoy the flower smell coming from the ladies. Finally everyone gives up and Ferdinand is returned to his pasture to enjoy his trees and flowers.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Wanda

    3 APR 2016 - Love, Love, Love this book. As a little girl, I carried this book everywhere. I did not know at that time that Ferdinand was all about seizing his day and enjoying it in the way most suitable to himself. Such a smart bull! As I re-read a newly purchased copy yesterday, I thought of this lovely poem: Gather Ye Rosebuds While Ye May, by John William Waterhouse (Source: Wikipedia) "To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time" is a poem written by English Cavalier poet Robert Herrick in the 17t 3 APR 2016 - Love, Love, Love this book. As a little girl, I carried this book everywhere. I did not know at that time that Ferdinand was all about seizing his day and enjoying it in the way most suitable to himself. Such a smart bull! As I re-read a newly purchased copy yesterday, I thought of this lovely poem: Gather Ye Rosebuds While Ye May, by John William Waterhouse (Source: Wikipedia) "To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time" is a poem written by English Cavalier poet Robert Herrick in the 17th century. The poem is in the genre of carpe diem, Latin for seize the day. It goes as follows: Gather ye rosebuds while ye may, Old Time is still a-flying; And this same flower that smiles today To-morrow will be dying. The glorious lamp of heaven, the sun, The higher he's a-getting, The sooner will his race be run, And nearer he's to setting. That age is best which is the first, When youth and blood are warmer; But being spent, the worse, and worst Then be not coy, but use your time, And, while ye may, go marry: For having lost but once your prime, You may forever tarry. Carpe Diem, Ferdinand! You have inspired this not-so-young woman to live her life in this moment. No looking back to the past which cannot be undone nor looking ahead to the future which has not occured. Carpe Diem.

  20. 5 out of 5

    midnightfaerie

    My children really enjoyed this one. The pictures were clear and drawn well, all in black and white, and it made for a more easily understandable understanding of the story line. The story was cute, and since we got it from the library, it came in a packet with an actual stuffed Ferdinand which allowed me to use my "bull voice" and have him make comments about the story and added another dimension altogether to our book time that we hadn't considered up until now. The children all loved it. My o My children really enjoyed this one. The pictures were clear and drawn well, all in black and white, and it made for a more easily understandable understanding of the story line. The story was cute, and since we got it from the library, it came in a packet with an actual stuffed Ferdinand which allowed me to use my "bull voice" and have him make comments about the story and added another dimension altogether to our book time that we hadn't considered up until now. The children all loved it. My only concern was that they fought over the stuffed animal and eventually it did have to go back to the library.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lata

    This is so cute. Ferdinand....awwww.....

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nika Zahedi

    Loved it!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    Read this for Reading Partners. Not 5 stars because bullfighting makes me really, really sad, but this is a sweet story.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    The story of Ferdinand, a very enjoyable story, by Munro Leaf tells the tale of a young bull named Ferdinand. Ferdinand grew up in a society’s where he was expected to take part in the Spanish bull fights in Madrid. Unlike all the other bulls, Ferdinand only wants to live in peace among the flowers and the open fields. As he grew, he became healthy and strong but with the same gentle heart as his young self. No matter what others say and expect from him, all he cares about is peace. One of the mo The story of Ferdinand, a very enjoyable story, by Munro Leaf tells the tale of a young bull named Ferdinand. Ferdinand grew up in a society’s where he was expected to take part in the Spanish bull fights in Madrid. Unlike all the other bulls, Ferdinand only wants to live in peace among the flowers and the open fields. As he grew, he became healthy and strong but with the same gentle heart as his young self. No matter what others say and expect from him, all he cares about is peace. One of the most shocking things about this story is that it was written in 1936! It’s a very creative story that talks about pursuing what makes you happy and not what other want you to do. The world, and people, back then were very conservative, expecting their children to grow up and being certain things; this very interesting to see that this kind of message was exposed to children back then, decades ago. The story is well written too; for a story written over eighty years ago, it has aged well and can compete with more recent children’s books. The story is told through the third person, omniscient, point of view. This severs the story well since you can see the thoughts and feeling of all the characters in the story. If it were told through the eyes of Ferdinand, the story would’ve been very different and more repetitive, considering the face that he spends most of his day looking at flowers. The most touching moment, in my opinion, was when Ferdinand’s mother accepted his choices without trying to make him reconsider; this wouldn’t have been known if not for the omniscient point of view. The characters are not the most interesting, though. This is a children’s book and it’s fairly short; because of this, there isn’t a lot of time for character development and that’s understandable. Ferdinand is the most rounded character in the whole book. His feelings are very different to those of the other young bulls, making him unique and different. Not only that, he’s a very introverted character, something that I haven’t seen a lot in children’s books. The other bulls and the humans in the story are just flat characters. They have no redeeming traits and are in the story just to keep it going. The tricky character is the mother. She only shows up in the story in one scene, but it’s very meaningful. She reveals her thoughts and acceptance towards her son’s decisions making her a very real character. The story relies heavily on the illustration to actually “tell” the story. If it weren’t for the illustrations, my reaction to the book would’ve not been so exciting. In fact, the illustrations are what make Ferdinand the rounded character that he is. It’s one thing to read that he’s grown up and another to actually see it. The illustrations let the reader see who Ferdinand is. Even though he’s this giant, tough bull, he has the same feeling he did as a child and no matter what, he’ll always be the same. This story is great. yee.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Phillip

    This book fascinated me when I was learning to read. I would read and reread it. I had a deep empathy for the bull, who found himself captive and with life in danger because of mistaken identification. The story and pictures were interesting and left questions open to my young mind that caused me to gaze in with my eyes and imagination to try to see what was beyond the pages of the story and beyond what was shown in the illustrations. I was raised in Bartlesville, Oklahoma. It was a nice mid-weste This book fascinated me when I was learning to read. I would read and reread it. I had a deep empathy for the bull, who found himself captive and with life in danger because of mistaken identification. The story and pictures were interesting and left questions open to my young mind that caused me to gaze in with my eyes and imagination to try to see what was beyond the pages of the story and beyond what was shown in the illustrations. I was raised in Bartlesville, Oklahoma. It was a nice mid-western town of approximately 32,000 residents. To me, Spain was a magical realm and the images of Robert Lawson provided sensory information of that place for my mind. I was so sheltered that I did not know crime existed in our town until I was well into high school. There were a lot of things about the real world around me that I was oblivious to. The idea of the bull fight as something people actually did teased my mind. I understood the concept, but thought it was something that happened so long ago that it was a part of history. I did not believe the people I knew would kill an animal for sport in that way (I believed hunting was different, because the hunter makes the death quick, and he is justified to hunt because he eats the animal). I also could not believe the people in my town would watch such a spectacle. I remember extrapolating that the people of Bartlesville were no different from the people any place else. Yet, there was a story describing the bull fight as though everyone thought it was good fun. And there were the illustrations showing the people and culture as though they were real. I didn't know what to think...And, poor Ferdinand. I was horrified. I remember looking at the faces and hats of the five men, in the illustration, who searched for a bull for the arena. I imaged what they were like and what their conversation was upon seeing Ferdinand during his rampage. I followed them home in my mind to see what the houses would look like for men who were dressed like they were. The corks hanging from the cork trees like fruit were a detail that really amused me. I discussed them with my mother. I have since read that "The Story of Ferdinand" was a cast off Munro Leaf wrote in half an hour to give his friend Lawson a story to illustrate. Regardless of how much or how little thought Munro Leaf put into the story it is true that children like myself have enjoyed the story and empathized with the Bull Ferdinand for decades. Throughout my life, every time I see a copy my heart leaps a little and I always want to open it to go into that world and see my old friend again. I love this book so much that I gave a copy to a colleague at her baby shower. It was an opportunity to share. I wish the enjoyment that I have gotten from that book upon every child.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Petra

    Tjuren Ferdinand kom som en glad överraskning i brevlådan, och jag var väldigt nyfiken på att läsa den. Så sagt och gjort så gjorde jag det, och jag tyckte väldigt mycket om den. Tjuren Ferdinand är en av mina favoritberättelser i Kalle Anka och hans vänner önskar God Jul, och jag ser den varje år. Så jag blev väldigt nöjd när jag såg att den här boken innehåller nästan allt som finns med i filmsnutten. Själva handlingen är så mysig, och jag älskar Ferdinand och hans blommor. Bilderna i boken, oc Tjuren Ferdinand kom som en glad överraskning i brevlådan, och jag var väldigt nyfiken på att läsa den. Så sagt och gjort så gjorde jag det, och jag tyckte väldigt mycket om den. Tjuren Ferdinand är en av mina favoritberättelser i Kalle Anka och hans vänner önskar God Jul, och jag ser den varje år. Så jag blev väldigt nöjd när jag såg att den här boken innehåller nästan allt som finns med i filmsnutten. Själva handlingen är så mysig, och jag älskar Ferdinand och hans blommor. Bilderna i boken, och hela boken i sig, var också väldigt fina, och jag gillar att de var svartvita. Jag tror att nostalgin kan ha lite mer att göra att jag tyckte så mycket om den här boken, men Tjuren Ferdinand är en stor favorit för mig. Den här boken funkar perfekt för både yngre och äldre läsare, och även om den inte har så mycket text så är det en sådan charmig historia (och en som definitivt gav mig julstämning nu, trots att själva berättelsen är långt ifrån julig). Rekommenderas varmt.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Erin Sky

    One of my absolute favorite children's stories.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ghazaal B.

    ۱۵ سالم بود. مادرید بودیم. رفته بودیم که گاوبازی ببینیم. گاوبازی و اتفاقات و مراحلش برام غریبه نیست. هر راند گاوبازی ۶ تا گاو سلاخی میشن. فقط اولی رو تونستم تا تهش بایستم، با دستام جلوی چشمهام. میفهممت فردیناند.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth A

    I'm not sure how I stumbled across this picture board book for kids, but was delighted from the first page to the last. First published in 1936, this is one of those classics that is relevant in any era and at any age. I love books that don't talk down to kids, and the black and white pen and ink art is lovely. A heart warming message of being true to yourself, and the peace and happiness that comes with that. Delightful.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Adriana Scarpin

    Once upon a time in Spain there was a little bull and his name was Ferdinand. All the other little bulls he lived with would run and jump and butt their heads together, but not Ferdinand. He liked to sit just quietly and smell the flowers. He had a favorite spot out in the pasture under a cork tree. It was his favorite tree and he would sit in its shade all day and smell the flowers. Sometimes his mother, who was a cow, would worry about him. She was afraid he would be lonesome all by himself. "Wh Once upon a time in Spain there was a little bull and his name was Ferdinand. All the other little bulls he lived with would run and jump and butt their heads together, but not Ferdinand. He liked to sit just quietly and smell the flowers. He had a favorite spot out in the pasture under a cork tree. It was his favorite tree and he would sit in its shade all day and smell the flowers. Sometimes his mother, who was a cow, would worry about him. She was afraid he would be lonesome all by himself. "Why don't you run and play with the other little bulls and skip and butt your head?" she would say. But Ferdinand would shake his head. "I like it better here where I can sit just quietly and smell the flowers." His mother saw that he was not lonesome, and because she was an understanding mother, even though she was a cow, she let him just sit there and be happy. As the years went by Ferdinand grew and grew until he was very big and strong. All the other bulls who had grown up with him in the same pasture would fight each other all day. They would butt each other and stick each other with their horns. What they wanted most of all was to be picked to fight at the bill fights in Madrid. But not Ferdinand_he still liked to sit just quietly under the cork tree and smell the flowers. One day five men came in very funny hats to pick the biggest, fastest roughest bull to fight in the bull fights in Madrid. All the other bulls ran around snorting and butting, leaping and jumping so the men would think that they were very very strong and fierce and pick them. Ferdinand knew that they wouldn't pick him and he didn't care. So he wount out to his favorite cork tree to sit down. He didn't look where he was sitting and instead of sitting on the nice cool grass in the shade he sat on a bumble bee. Well, if you were a bumble bee and a bull sat on you what would you do? You would sting him. And that is just what this bee did to Ferdinand. Wow! Did it hurt! Ferdinand jumped up with a snort. He ran around puffing and snorting, butting and pawing the ground as if he were crazy. The five men saw him and they all shouted with joy. here was the largest and fiercest bull of all. Just the one for the bull fights in Madrid! So they took him away for the bullfight day in a cart. What a day it was! Flags were flying, bands were playing... and all the lovely ladies had flowers in their hair. They had a parade ino the bull ring. First came the Banderilleros with long sharp pins with ribbins on them to stick in the bull and make him mad. Next came the Picadores who rode skinny horses and they had long spears to stick in the bull and make him madder. Then came the Matador, the proudest of all_he thought he was very handsome, and bowed to the ladies. He had a red cape and a sword and was supposed to stick the bull last of all. Then came the bull, and you know who that was don't you? They called him Ferdinand the Fierce and all of the Banderilleros were afraid of him and the Picadores were afraid of him and the Matador was scared stiff. Ferdinand ran to the middle of the ring and everyone shouted and clapped because they thought he was going to fight fiercely and butt and snort and stick his horns around. But not ferdinand. When he got to the middle of the ring he saw the flowers in all the lovely ladies' hair and he just sat down quietly and smelled. He wouldn't fight and be fierce no matter what they did. He just sat and smelled. And the Banderilleros were mad and the Picadores were madder and the Matador was so mad he cried because he couldn't show off with his cape and sword. So they had to take Ferdinand home. And for all I know he is sitting there still, under his favorite cork tree, smelling the flowers just quietly. He is very happy..

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