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Seriously Curious: The Facts and Figures that Turn Our World Upside Down

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Smart, savvy answers to universal questions, from the highly popular The Economist Explains and Daily Chart blogs-a treat for the knowing, the uninitiated, and the downright curious. Seriously Curious: The Facts and Figures that Turn Our World Upside Down brings together the very best explainers and charts, written and created by top journalists to help us understand such Smart, savvy answers to universal questions, from the highly popular The Economist Explains and Daily Chart blogs-a treat for the knowing, the uninitiated, and the downright curious. Seriously Curious: The Facts and Figures that Turn Our World Upside Down brings together the very best explainers and charts, written and created by top journalists to help us understand such brain-bending conundrums as why Swedes overpay their taxes, why America still allows child marriage, and what the link is between avocados and crime. Subjects both topical and timeless, profound and peculiar, are explained with The Economist's trademark wit and verve. The Economist Explains and its online sister, the Daily Chart, are the two most popular blogs on The Economist's website. Together, these online giants provide answers to the kinds of questions, quirky and serious, that may be puzzling anyone interested in the world around them. Want to know why exorcisms are on the rise in France or how porn consumption changed during a false alarm missile strike warning in Hawaii? We have the answers They are sometimes surprising, often intriguing, and always enlightening.


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Smart, savvy answers to universal questions, from the highly popular The Economist Explains and Daily Chart blogs-a treat for the knowing, the uninitiated, and the downright curious. Seriously Curious: The Facts and Figures that Turn Our World Upside Down brings together the very best explainers and charts, written and created by top journalists to help us understand such Smart, savvy answers to universal questions, from the highly popular The Economist Explains and Daily Chart blogs-a treat for the knowing, the uninitiated, and the downright curious. Seriously Curious: The Facts and Figures that Turn Our World Upside Down brings together the very best explainers and charts, written and created by top journalists to help us understand such brain-bending conundrums as why Swedes overpay their taxes, why America still allows child marriage, and what the link is between avocados and crime. Subjects both topical and timeless, profound and peculiar, are explained with The Economist's trademark wit and verve. The Economist Explains and its online sister, the Daily Chart, are the two most popular blogs on The Economist's website. Together, these online giants provide answers to the kinds of questions, quirky and serious, that may be puzzling anyone interested in the world around them. Want to know why exorcisms are on the rise in France or how porn consumption changed during a false alarm missile strike warning in Hawaii? We have the answers They are sometimes surprising, often intriguing, and always enlightening.

30 review for Seriously Curious: The Facts and Figures that Turn Our World Upside Down

  1. 5 out of 5

    Elentarri

    This book is a collection of very short, but (sometimes) interesting chapters on a hodge-podge of different subjects. Good for filling in a few minutes here and there, but not particularly spectacular.

  2. 5 out of 5

    India

    Whilst coming across this book in a local New Zealand bookstore, I was genuinely "seriously curious" to see what knowledge this book offered. After realising that the book was written by "The Economist," I was even more compelled to buy it. Having read over 3/4 of the book in about 2 hours, it is definitely a book for aspiring economists who understand the workings of opportunity cost and time management. For each question asked, the answer is succinct and provided within 2 pages. The nature of Whilst coming across this book in a local New Zealand bookstore, I was genuinely "seriously curious" to see what knowledge this book offered. After realising that the book was written by "The Economist," I was even more compelled to buy it. Having read over 3/4 of the book in about 2 hours, it is definitely a book for aspiring economists who understand the workings of opportunity cost and time management. For each question asked, the answer is succinct and provided within 2 pages. The nature of the book is much like that of "Freakonomics" by Stephen J. Dubner and Steven Levitt. It explains the random occurrences that take place across the world through economics, with strange facts and figures to support it. For example, "Why Polygamy makes civil wars more likely," "Why spaghetti is smuggled across the Sahara," "Why Swedes overpay their taxes," and "The surprising link between avocados and crime." The book is split into 10 different sections ranging from science to food, to festivals to language. It covers almost everything you would never have thought of. The book is very informative yet humorous. I highly recommend it to anyone who is interested in economics or just the intricate workings behind the obscurities of the world. It's a quick read but nevertheless very intellectually stimulating.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Adrian Bennetts

    Short bite sized (3 pages at most) stories about a wild variety of topics. You will notice some stories if you read the economist regularly, which is probably the main downside of the book. Easy to read, interesting facts and fairly easy to read if you have to pick up and put down the book with regularity.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Siebe

    Good book for those two minutes you're waiting on the bus to arrive. The 'facts' described are just a couple of pages each. Not all are evenly interesting and the ones that are often feel a bit short.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Elmwoodblues

    A pocket manual for your inner Cliff Clavin. A few hundred words and maybe a small graph on scores of odd correlations and causations in our everyday world, from porn in times of incoming missiles to how avocados cause crime. Be the big hit at holiday parties you know you can be!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Shaun Watson

    A relatively quick read this one, each subject no more than 2 or 3 pages. Mostly very interesting and I certainly learned a thing or two. Would definitely recommend as a quick beneficial read.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Miffy

    If I could give it 4.5 I would. A great read. Bite sized chunks of very interesting topics and questions. Highly recommend.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Marta

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mariano

  10. 4 out of 5

    Carmen

  11. 5 out of 5

    Catalin

  12. 5 out of 5

    Igor

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jdebie

  14. 5 out of 5

    Theoria

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jiwan Beth

  16. 4 out of 5

    João

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jibson89

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ellen

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sophie Houston

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan William Minton

  21. 4 out of 5

    Divine Gonçalves

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ilshat Garay

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tom

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kayla

  25. 5 out of 5

    Abdul-Latif Halimi

  26. 5 out of 5

    Steve Wang

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ivan Krsnik

  28. 5 out of 5

    H Morton

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jane

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ronald Milano

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