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You Brought Me the Ocean

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Jake Hyde doesn’t swim—not since his father drowned. Luckily, he lives in Truth or Consequences, New Mexico, which is in the middle of the desert, yet he yearns for the ocean and is determined to leave his hometown for a college on the coast. But his best friend, Maria, wants nothing more than to make a home in the desert, and Jake’s mother encourages him to always play it Jake Hyde doesn’t swim—not since his father drowned. Luckily, he lives in Truth or Consequences, New Mexico, which is in the middle of the desert, yet he yearns for the ocean and is determined to leave his hometown for a college on the coast. But his best friend, Maria, wants nothing more than to make a home in the desert, and Jake’s mother encourages him to always play it safe. There’s nothing “safe” about Jake’s future—not when he’s attracted to Kenny Liu, swim team captain and rebel against conformity. And certainly not when he secretly applies to Miami University. Jake’s life begins to outpace his small town’s namesake, which doesn’t make it any easier to come out to his mom, or Maria, or the world. But Jake is full of secrets, including the strange blue markings on his skin that glow when in contact with water. What power will he find when he searches for his identity, and will he turn his back to the current or dive headfirst into the waves?


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Jake Hyde doesn’t swim—not since his father drowned. Luckily, he lives in Truth or Consequences, New Mexico, which is in the middle of the desert, yet he yearns for the ocean and is determined to leave his hometown for a college on the coast. But his best friend, Maria, wants nothing more than to make a home in the desert, and Jake’s mother encourages him to always play it Jake Hyde doesn’t swim—not since his father drowned. Luckily, he lives in Truth or Consequences, New Mexico, which is in the middle of the desert, yet he yearns for the ocean and is determined to leave his hometown for a college on the coast. But his best friend, Maria, wants nothing more than to make a home in the desert, and Jake’s mother encourages him to always play it safe. There’s nothing “safe” about Jake’s future—not when he’s attracted to Kenny Liu, swim team captain and rebel against conformity. And certainly not when he secretly applies to Miami University. Jake’s life begins to outpace his small town’s namesake, which doesn’t make it any easier to come out to his mom, or Maria, or the world. But Jake is full of secrets, including the strange blue markings on his skin that glow when in contact with water. What power will he find when he searches for his identity, and will he turn his back to the current or dive headfirst into the waves?

30 review for You Brought Me the Ocean

  1. 4 out of 5

    daph pink || 君は

    The story was just "WHATEVER". I didn't liked any of the characters, it wasn't worth my time!!

  2. 5 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    I know Alex Sanchez through Rainbow Boys and his other GLTQ YA books. I know Julie Maroh from her Blue is the Warmest Color comics novel. So this graphic novel is the story of Aqualad who in this version is also gay. Jake and Maria are bffs forever. Maria is in love with Jake but Jake is actually questioning his sexual identity, and is on the verge of coming out gay. They live in New Mexico, in the desert; Maria wants to live there and contrbute to making it a better world, and Jake wants to stu I know Alex Sanchez through Rainbow Boys and his other GLTQ YA books. I know Julie Maroh from her Blue is the Warmest Color comics novel. So this graphic novel is the story of Aqualad who in this version is also gay. Jake and Maria are bffs forever. Maria is in love with Jake but Jake is actually questioning his sexual identity, and is on the verge of coming out gay. They live in New Mexico, in the desert; Maria wants to live there and contrbute to making it a better world, and Jake wants to study oceanography. . in Florida (but at Miami University, which is in Ohio?!). Jake crushes on Kenny, the only out gay kid at their school, who's bullied by Zeke and a bunch of other white guys, maybe the only white folks in the book. So he has a lot of secrets to keep from Maria, who he is afraid he will lose as a friend ife he comes out to her as gay. Or if he leaves NM to go to school. Now add to this mix that Jake has strange markings on his body (his Mom calls them birthmarks) indicating that he is actually Aqualad--his Dad Black Manta--which is to say Jake has superpowers connected to water. So Jake's coming out gay and superhero at the same time, which is kind of a cool idea. So this is also a story also for diverse chracters: Jake is black. Maria is Latina. Kenny is Asian. One of their coolest teachers, Mrs. Archer, is Native American. I like Julie Maroh's intimate, pastel artwork; the story is okay, affirming of all things queer and of color and every single thing ultimately works out for everyone. So if you are a gay youth of color and you want your superhero books more queer and color affirming, this is what this book/series is all about. Or being true to yourself, no secrets, no fear. And it appears now to be a series, as we would now expect to see how Jake can live as Aqualad.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    I received a copy of this book for free from the publisher (DC Comics) in exchange for an honest review. I give this book 4.5 stars which rounds up to 5. This was a heartfelt origin story that tackles identity and sexuality. Prior to reading this, I had no idea who Jake Hyde (aka Aqualad) was so I had no expectations going in about his origin story. I was pleasantly surprised. The superhero element was a lot more subtle than I thought it would be. Jake trying to figure out the mystery behind his I received a copy of this book for free from the publisher (DC Comics) in exchange for an honest review. I give this book 4.5 stars which rounds up to 5. This was a heartfelt origin story that tackles identity and sexuality. Prior to reading this, I had no idea who Jake Hyde (aka Aqualad) was so I had no expectations going in about his origin story. I was pleasantly surprised. The superhero element was a lot more subtle than I thought it would be. Jake trying to figure out the mystery behind his powers and coming to terms with his sexuality were both given equal weight. I liked that the book didn’t go too overboard with the superhero aspect because that could have easily overshadowed the coming-out story. The plot is very basic (it’s not the most exciting superhero comic you will read), but it works well for what the story was trying to accomplish. Sometimes less is more, and this book proves that. As for the characters, I loved Kenny. He was hands down my favorite character. I also loved the diversity in the characters. Jake is black. His best friend, Maria, is Latina. Kenny is Asian. The teacher, Mrs. Archer, is Native American. At first I wasn’t a fan of the artwork. I saw a sneak peek of this in another DC Comic and I was a little hesitant. The artwork seemed a little incomplete. But as I started the book and kept reading, I grew to love and appreciate it. There was actually a lot of detail in the sketches. I loved that at the end of the book there was sketches from the illustrator explaining the thought process behind them. Overall, I really enjoyed this beautiful superhero comic and its coming-out storyline! #RepresentationMatters

  4. 4 out of 5

    Teal

    This YA graphic novel with a gay/questioning MC is set in a world where, if something flashes by overhead, you can whip out your binoculars and see that it’s not a bird, it’s not a plane, it’s The POV is shared by three teenagers — which got a bit tedious, honestly, and I had to put the book down briefly at about halfway to let my eyeballs recover from over-rolling. But fundamentally this is Jake’s story, as he grapples with the consequences of keeping secrets and having secrets kept from him. I w This YA graphic novel with a gay/questioning MC is set in a world where, if something flashes by overhead, you can whip out your binoculars and see that it’s not a bird, it’s not a plane, it’s The POV is shared by three teenagers — which got a bit tedious, honestly, and I had to put the book down briefly at about halfway to let my eyeballs recover from over-rolling. But fundamentally this is Jake’s story, as he grapples with the consequences of keeping secrets and having secrets kept from him. I would say it was… nice. Nice enough. Probably 2 stars for the story, 3.5 stars for the art. The latter is always more important to me — good art will keep me going through a mediocre story, but if I dislike the art no story is strong enough to keep me reading. The color palette alternates between a dry yellow representing the New Mexico desert landscape and the blues of the waterscapes Jake dreams of -- and has increasingly surprising interactions with. I loved the way the diverse cast of characters was rendered. Each one was striking and individual in their own way. The ending isn’t a cliffhanger, but it’s very open and “to be continued” is strongly implied.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    This is virtually the same Aqualad story Geoff Johns told in Brightest Day adding in a LGBTQ love triangle. Jake Hyde is preparing to go away to college soon while figuring out his sexuality. He's attached to the hip to his best friend Maria. Some people including Maria wonder if they may be more. That's when he starts talking to Kenny... The whole water / super power angle seems thrown in to make it part of the DC universe even though that was the core of the story this is based on. I wasn't a This is virtually the same Aqualad story Geoff Johns told in Brightest Day adding in a LGBTQ love triangle. Jake Hyde is preparing to go away to college soon while figuring out his sexuality. He's attached to the hip to his best friend Maria. Some people including Maria wonder if they may be more. That's when he starts talking to Kenny... The whole water / super power angle seems thrown in to make it part of the DC universe even though that was the core of the story this is based on. I wasn't a fan of Julie Maroh's art. Her facial features looked distorted and the shadowing felt off. Received a review copy from Edelweiss and DC Comics. All thoughts are my own and in no way influenced by the aforementioned.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Juan

    Okay I'm sorry I'm sure this comic will be cute but this has been bothering me for weeks now. Miami University is not a "college on the coast". It's in Ohio. Ohio is landlocked. I'm going to start losing sleep over this I s2g DC please fix it EDIT: I have been informed that this was fixed in the ARC so now I can sleep at night again

  7. 5 out of 5

    Larry H

    4.5 stars. You Brought Me the Ocean is a captivating, poignant graphic novel about a young man trying to figure out who he is. For reasons he can’t explain, Jake has always been obsessed with the ocean, and with water in general. He's even constantly thirsty. He dreams of studying marine biology, which would require him to leave his New Mexico hometown and all of those who are close to him. His mother has always been overprotective, perhaps because his father drowned when Jake was a baby. He sp 4.5 stars. You Brought Me the Ocean is a captivating, poignant graphic novel about a young man trying to figure out who he is. For reasons he can’t explain, Jake has always been obsessed with the ocean, and with water in general. He's even constantly thirsty. He dreams of studying marine biology, which would require him to leave his New Mexico hometown and all of those who are close to him. His mother has always been overprotective, perhaps because his father drowned when Jake was a baby. He spends all of his spare time with his best friend, Maria. She knows Jake dreams of going to Miami for college to study the ocean, but she hopes he’ll stay closer to home with her. Lately Jake has been feeling strange. His feelings confuse him until he starts talking to a classmate, Kenny, who has always been bullied because he’s gay. The more time Jake spends with Kenny the more he realizes he’s been hiding a part of him for far too long. The other thing he’s been struggling with is that strange things happen to him when he’s around water. He’s always had these distinctive markings on his arms—suddenly they’re giving him the power to control water. Is something wrong with him? Or is there a secret someone has been hiding? I didn’t know that this was an origin story for Aqualad, but obviously that makes sense. I love superhero stories and love when they first start to discover their abilities. But the storyline of Jake’s sexuality really added depth to this book. This is beautifully illustrated by Julie Maroh and well-written by Alex Sanchez. (I loved one of his books, Rainbow Boys , earlier this year.) Looking forward to (hopefully) another book in this series! Check out my list of the best books I read in 2019 at https://itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com/2020/01/the-best-books-i-read-in-2019.html. Check out my list of the best books of the decade at https://itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com/2020/01/my-favorite-books-of-decade.html. See all of my reviews at itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com. Follow me on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/the.bookishworld.of.yrralh/.

  8. 4 out of 5

    TJ

    This could have been something special, but the execution of all these themes and ideas is mediocre. The dialogue is straight up awful, the characters are unbelievably stupid for plot reasons, and the art style wasn’t for me most of the time. This reads very juvenile, overall. With a different writer and an extra hundred pages, this could have been spectacular. The combination of sexuality awakening and super powers awakening is golden. Instead of exploring those topics maturely and logically th This could have been something special, but the execution of all these themes and ideas is mediocre. The dialogue is straight up awful, the characters are unbelievably stupid for plot reasons, and the art style wasn’t for me most of the time. This reads very juvenile, overall. With a different writer and an extra hundred pages, this could have been spectacular. The combination of sexuality awakening and super powers awakening is golden. Instead of exploring those topics maturely and logically though, I hope you enjoy water puns and coming out stories stuck in the 2000s. 2.5/5 stars.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Carly Faith

    this was so cringey. maria was beyond annoying and selfish. only character i liked was kenny. he was the only decent one. this entire book kinda made no sense either. very weird plot and kinda childish, didn't come out strong in the writing either. overal not what i expected when i went in to this book. cute lgbtq+ rep but uh that's really it. i wish i didn't read this.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kali Cole

    Oh wow! I read this in one sitting and it was so wonderful! I loved the relationship between Jake and Kenny and I really enjoyed the illustrations. I’ve been getting into more comics lately and I’m very thankful to DC Comics for sending me a copy of this. I think in terms of how fulfilling the story is, I’d probably give it about 3 stars just because it went way to fast paced. I’m not used to the pacing of comics so that could be why. However, I love Aquaman and I think this story is a really in Oh wow! I read this in one sitting and it was so wonderful! I loved the relationship between Jake and Kenny and I really enjoyed the illustrations. I’ve been getting into more comics lately and I’m very thankful to DC Comics for sending me a copy of this. I think in terms of how fulfilling the story is, I’d probably give it about 3 stars just because it went way to fast paced. I’m not used to the pacing of comics so that could be why. However, I love Aquaman and I think this story is a really interesting spinoff. I hope to see more comics surrounding Jake Hyde.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Devann

    I received an ARC copy of this book from NetGalley I do agree with what a lot of other reviewers are saying about this book in that it is kind of awkward and dated, but I also still think there is value to be found in it and I did enjoy reading it for the most part. I have basically no prior knowledge on Aqualad so I don't know how this compares to any other version of the character or origin story but I think it was a [mostly] cute enough take on it for new readers. I could have done without the I received an ARC copy of this book from NetGalley I do agree with what a lot of other reviewers are saying about this book in that it is kind of awkward and dated, but I also still think there is value to be found in it and I did enjoy reading it for the most part. I have basically no prior knowledge on Aqualad so I don't know how this compares to any other version of the character or origin story but I think it was a [mostly] cute enough take on it for new readers. I could have done without the brief moments of actually fairly violent homophobia and a few other things that make this book seem like it's set about 15-20 years in the past, but overall I think it's a good title and I'm glad I read it. I do really like DC's new series of standalone comics for young readers but they are obviously not perfect and hopefully they will listen to reader feedback and continue to make progress in the future.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Marnie (Enchanted Bibliophile)

    For The 2020 Reading Rush prompt Read a book with a cover that matches the colour of your birth stone. I fell head over heels, absolute completely in love with the art. I mean I will read anything illustrated by Julie Maroh. Her art is mesmerizing. Add to this beautiful art a compelling story of friendships, coming-of-age, coming-out (in more than the obvious way); and you get a tale you can't help but love it. I sat down read it and then immediately re-read the whole thing. And believe me I'll read For The 2020 Reading Rush prompt Read a book with a cover that matches the colour of your birth stone. I fell head over heels, absolute completely in love with the art. I mean I will read anything illustrated by Julie Maroh. Her art is mesmerizing. Add to this beautiful art a compelling story of friendships, coming-of-age, coming-out (in more than the obvious way); and you get a tale you can't help but love it. I sat down read it and then immediately re-read the whole thing. And believe me I'll read a next volume as well. Just tell me when it's available.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    This is another one that looked as though it would work, but felt as though it tried to hard. It is part coming out story, and part discovering your secret powers. There is a sort of LGBTQ love story thrown in, and the girl who is a "friend" who doesn't realize that Jake is gay, but then, neither does he. The story is a little slow to start, and when it starts to pick up steam, it ends too abruptly. And although this is supposed to be set in the DC universe, it feels forced, as sightings of Superma This is another one that looked as though it would work, but felt as though it tried to hard. It is part coming out story, and part discovering your secret powers. There is a sort of LGBTQ love story thrown in, and the girl who is a "friend" who doesn't realize that Jake is gay, but then, neither does he. The story is a little slow to start, and when it starts to pick up steam, it ends too abruptly. And although this is supposed to be set in the DC universe, it feels forced, as sightings of Superman and Aquaman are thrown in parts, just to make good. Very odd graphic novel. Thanks to Netgalley for making this book available for an honest review.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    3.5 Stars I’ve been craving comics lately. Stories told panel by panel with color and angles and words. So off I went searching shelves and lists and sites. You Brought Me the Ocean jumped out at me for two reasons… 1. HELLO! It’s a coming out story with super powers! 2. Alex Sanchez! I haven’t read his words since Rainbow Boys. I dived right in! :) Jake Hyde is hiding secrets on top of secrets. He’s hiding his sexuality from his mother, best friend, and maybe even himself. Is he ready to come out t 3.5 Stars I’ve been craving comics lately. Stories told panel by panel with color and angles and words. So off I went searching shelves and lists and sites. You Brought Me the Ocean jumped out at me for two reasons… 1. HELLO! It’s a coming out story with super powers! 2. Alex Sanchez! I haven’t read his words since Rainbow Boys. I dived right in! :) Jake Hyde is hiding secrets on top of secrets. He’s hiding his sexuality from his mother, best friend, and maybe even himself. Is he ready to come out though? Maybe he is for Kenny, the school’s swim team star. But Jake has another secret too. He can control water! Well maybe, sort of. Haha…Jake’s just learning what he can do with his powers and water. Is he in over his head though? Tune in and find out. For me, the star of the show was the art. Julie Maroh’s lines display mesmerizing movement and huge emotion. I loved how the characters moved on the page. I couldn’t look away! A strong read that introduced me to Aqualad. Off to find out more.

  15. 4 out of 5

    ˗ˏˋ janet ˊˎ˗

    I love how Kenny & Jake both have a deep love for the ocean and Maria is a desert gal

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lu

    I received this book from NetGalley in exchange of an honest review. An HUGE thanks to DC comics for this free book. All opinions are my own. TW: homophobia, homophobic slurs, physical assault Jake Hyde lives in Truth or Consequences, New Mexico, a city in the desert, with his overprotective mother, eager to keep him safe and away from the water, since his father drowned. But Jake is attracted to and longs for the ocean, he wants to leave his hometown where he feels suffocated and go to college on I received this book from NetGalley in exchange of an honest review. An HUGE thanks to DC comics for this free book. All opinions are my own. TW: homophobia, homophobic slurs, physical assault Jake Hyde lives in Truth or Consequences, New Mexico, a city in the desert, with his overprotective mother, eager to keep him safe and away from the water, since his father drowned. But Jake is attracted to and longs for the ocean, he wants to leave his hometown where he feels suffocated and go to college on the coast, while Maria, his best friend and neighbour, wants to stay there and Jake's mom wants him safe and sound with her. But Jake isn't safe, not when he starts to question his sexuality, not when he applies to Miami University without telling anyone, not when he's attracted to the swim team captain, Kenny, who is out and rebel and stick out in their hometown, bullied for being himself. Jake's life is complicated and full of secrets, secrets he hides from others and secrets he doesn't even know about himself. When the time comes to face them, will he be ready? I loved You brought me the ocean. I already knew Julie Maroh and Alex Sanchez and this graphic novel is simply amazing. The artwork is so beautiful and evocative, I was really in love since the first page. The plot is captivating and I was right away able to relate and connect to the characters and their struggles. Jake feels trapped in his hometown and his eagerness to get away and explore the world and the oceans, his dreams, fears and secrets are drawn and written skillfully. So his relationship with his overprotective and kind mother, with sweet Maria, with rebel Kenny. It was so sweet reading how slowly Jake starts to understand his own feelings and decided to be himself around himself and others. How Jake starts to question his "birthmarks" and his affinity for the water, how he discovers his powers and past. I was able to feel how he felt, his being trapped and eager to explore, to move, to be true and honest to himself. Maria and Kenny are also amazing characters, Maria with her secret feelings and the difficulty of being honest with herself and her best friend, Kenny with the fact he didn't want to conform to anything and pretend to be anyone, with his complicated relationship with his father, who is struggling to accept his sexuality. It's beautiful and intense reading about Jake's journey, in discovering his identity, his sexuality, supported by his friend, love and family. You brought me the ocean deals with a lots of important themes, like homophobia and bullying (since first Kenny then Jake too are bullied by the bigots of the town), coming out, the difficulties of following your dreams, the loss of parents, friendship issues, physical assault. It's a book about the difficulty and strength in being true and honest to oneself, friendship and first love. I recommend to everyone who wants to lose her/himself in a wonderful graphic novel about identity, love, courage and friendship.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa Menezes

    This was an okay book which felt a bit incomplete.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sarina

    CWs: abuse, anti-LGBTQ+ violence, bullying, depression, homophobia, homophobic slur, nonconsensual operations The cover reminded me of Blue Is the Warmest Color, so of course I had to pick it up. It turns out that this is, in fact, illustrated by the one and only Julie Maroh! I will never cease to be amazed by the expressiveness of their characters. I felt every emotion on the page, no small feat because there was such a large range of emotions to convey. This could be your generic coming-out- CWs: abuse, anti-LGBTQ+ violence, bullying, depression, homophobia, homophobic slur, nonconsensual operations The cover reminded me of Blue Is the Warmest Color, so of course I had to pick it up. It turns out that this is, in fact, illustrated by the one and only Julie Maroh! I will never cease to be amazed by the expressiveness of their characters. I felt every emotion on the page, no small feat because there was such a large range of emotions to convey. This could be your generic coming-out-romance story, but there’s something that sets it apart from the crowd. I think it boils down to the beautiful relationships these characters share and how those relationships evolve. Everyone has a lesson to learn; everyone has something to teach. And I think that’s beautiful.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Karlee

    This was a nice quick read. I wish this comic had been around when I was younger but I think this fits for the next generation. I loved reading the diverse characters as well as the LGBTQ representation. Superman and Aquaman make an appearance which would make any DC fan happy. Unfortunately, I didn't like the ending. I felt as if it was left on a cliff hanger and there was no mention of a sequel. There were too many unanswered questions.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Compelling story, just the very end was a bit rushed...

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mae Crowe

    I feel very weird about this one, and waiting two weeks before writing the review really isn't helping anything. I'm not sure that the rating I have on this is final - I'm hovering between 2 and 3 stars - but considering that part of the reason I want to bump it to three is the art style and thematic application of colors and I generally review story above art because that's what I look for first... Well. I went with two for now. You Brought Me the Ocean had a chance to be really cute. I read it b I feel very weird about this one, and waiting two weeks before writing the review really isn't helping anything. I'm not sure that the rating I have on this is final - I'm hovering between 2 and 3 stars - but considering that part of the reason I want to bump it to three is the art style and thematic application of colors and I generally review story above art because that's what I look for first... Well. I went with two for now. You Brought Me the Ocean had a chance to be really cute. I read it because I was in the mood for a cute little story, an easy read, something short and I just... Speaking as a queer woman, it kind of made me uncomfortable. The story really does seem to push the theme that secrets are bad and choosing to stay closeted is selfish. That's not a message any LGBTQ+ kid needs to hear, because you'd better believe that thought already passes through their head on a regular basis. And as a college student who constantly deals with the ramifications of being out at school but closeted at home, reading a story that suggests that my choice is selfish isn't pleasant, despite knowing that it's not true. I will say this: I don't think this theme was truly intended by the author. The characters who perpetrate much of this theme ultimately admit that they had no right to make those demands of the main character, but it was almost a throwaway, which isn't enough after Jake (and the reader) spend the majority of the book internalizing this notion of being selfish for not being out. If it was handled better, it would have been great commentary on how being out or being closeted is ultimately a choice that no one else has the right to comment on - unfortunately, the imbalance of time spent on the accusations vs. the apologies means that it falls to the wayside. You Brought Me the Ocean has a cute art style with intelligent use of color. Unfortunately, a story that had the potential to be equally cute was overshadowed by damaging themes produced by an imbalance of story focus.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    An angsty but heartwarming gay romance that just happens to involve some super powers. Jake Hyde has a lot of secrets for a high school kid in a small desert town in New Mexico: his college plans, his attraction to classmate Kenny Liu, and what happens when he comes into contact with water. Over the course of a few days, the secrets start coming out, rocking Jake, his friends and his family. A nicely drawn and written character study. Unlike some of the more Elseworlds sort of DC Graphic Novels fo An angsty but heartwarming gay romance that just happens to involve some super powers. Jake Hyde has a lot of secrets for a high school kid in a small desert town in New Mexico: his college plans, his attraction to classmate Kenny Liu, and what happens when he comes into contact with water. Over the course of a few days, the secrets start coming out, rocking Jake, his friends and his family. A nicely drawn and written character study. Unlike some of the more Elseworlds sort of DC Graphic Novels for Young Adults, this one seems like it could fit in regular DCU continuity, and I hope the powers that be at DC make regular use of the Jake Hyde character, perhaps in Young Justice. But first I would love to see a follow-up volume by this same creative team. (p.s., Oh, ha ha, apparently there is already a Jackson Hyde/Aqualad character that I missed in the DC Brightest Day and Rebirth events, and this story is a spin on his existing origin.)

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rick

    Where was this when I was kid!? Seriously, I wish I could have read this when I was 13 or 14. Of course, when I was 13-14 something like this could never have been published. This is a beautiful story, well written and gorgeously illustrated. At first I didn’t think the style of the art was going to work for me, but now I css as my image it bring drawn by anyone else. Thank you to everyone involved in the creation of this book. It’s more priceless, more beautiful, than the Heart of the Ocean.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Gustavo

    I finished it so soon. I want more 😩thank you Elsa for this amazing gift. I loved it.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sasha Zatz

    You Brought Me the Ocean by Alex Sanchez and Julie Maroh is a gorgeous and vivid story about identity, incorporating superhero aspects into a character-driven and emotional story. Jake Hyde lives in a small town in the middle of the desert - he longs to move to the sea after his last year of high school, but in the mean time he deals with the difficulties of friendship, first love, prejudice, family and finding out that he’s, well, a superhero!
I really enjoyed this comic. It wasn’t perfect and You Brought Me the Ocean by Alex Sanchez and Julie Maroh is a gorgeous and vivid story about identity, incorporating superhero aspects into a character-driven and emotional story. Jake Hyde lives in a small town in the middle of the desert - he longs to move to the sea after his last year of high school, but in the mean time he deals with the difficulties of friendship, first love, prejudice, family and finding out that he’s, well, a superhero!
I really enjoyed this comic. It wasn’t perfect and I do understand some of the criticism of it but for me it was a perfect escapist and enjoyable story. I really love how character focused it was - I know it is a superhero story, but that’s just another aspect that plays into Jake discovering and accepting his identity. Obviously, I love the super power and fighting stuff, but what I love even more is the emotions in this comic. It’s topics of acceptance are so beautiful and the blossoming relationship between Jake and Kenny is so adorable and sweet! I liked Maria too, and her friendship with Jake, as well as all of their parents. This was a story about super powers but most importantly it was about relationships of all forms. I liked all the characters so much, and the art captures their personalities so well. I love it’s pale hues with vivid aspects, the emotive expressions that make the characters so relatable and loveable and the gorgeous scenery. The art overall was so expressive and stunning. I love Jake, he is a mix of sweet, sensitive and funny that makes him so likeable and such a great main character. His personality was so clear in such a short comic, which I really appreciate. Kenny was so cute and the chemistry between him and Jake was so real! I also really liked Maria, Jake’s best friend, who is kind, hopeful and fierce. The plot wasn’t super exciting or fast paced, but I still got totally lost in it, and I’d really like to see more of these characters! You Brought Me The Ocean was a beautiful story of identity and relationships that shone from the page, and I’d definitely recommend it as the perfect graphic novel for pride month. - really good, character focused n GAYYYY! review soon :)

  26. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

    You Brought Me the Ocean is an origin story for Aqualad, this time as a gay Black teen living in the US Southwest. So many secrets. His mother's been keeping him away for water his entire life, but why? What are the "birthmarks" on his arms and why do they glow when exposed to water? Is he gay? Why does everyone think he's dating his best friend Maria? And is it time to talk to the only out gay guy at school? Or do more than talk? Long-time readers of queer comics will be familiar with Julie Maro You Brought Me the Ocean is an origin story for Aqualad, this time as a gay Black teen living in the US Southwest. So many secrets. His mother's been keeping him away for water his entire life, but why? What are the "birthmarks" on his arms and why do they glow when exposed to water? Is he gay? Why does everyone think he's dating his best friend Maria? And is it time to talk to the only out gay guy at school? Or do more than talk? Long-time readers of queer comics will be familiar with Julie Maroh's art. Soft lines and a pencils and watercolor feel. Subdued colors. Lots of longing looks. This was my first time reading anything by Alex Sanchez, however, and I was pleased. Jake (Aqualad) falls for Kenny, a Chinese-American boy with green hair and a conservative dad who uses a wheelchair. Kenny feels trapped in town because if he leaves his father will be managing the local inn alone since his mother passed away years ago. He's the only out gay kid and that's also isolating, even if he has some friends. The romance between Jake and Kenny is complicated but felt true and deep. Readers should know that You Brought Me the Ocean is heavy on homophobia, including some actual gay-bashing. Jake's long-time best friend is Mexican-American and she's been waiting for years for Jake to finally want to date her. She's initially angry when she finds Jake and Kenny kissing, but it's not homophobia so much as really hurt feelings based on an assumption she never should have made. They're all seniors in high school, which adds another element of uncertainty to the story. I'm not sure about you, but my family decided that when I was 18, I got to know all the messy family business and this felt a bit like that. (Why is it that everyone wants to turn your life completely upside down when you're already in a period of massive transition?) In all, this book is beautifully illustrated and a bit heart-breaking but ultimately a loving and hopeful origin story for a young man destined for great things. *** Content Warnings: homophobia, bullying, assault Suzanne received a copy of this book from the publisher for review.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Deborah

    This is a story that could have been really cool, but unfortunately is dragged down by a lot of different aspects. The writing is weak and incredibly stilted. The water theme is overplayed and nearly every page features some sort of water/ocean quip that feels forced. Dialogue just lacks any charisma or creativity; if feels like I’m reading a hasty draft for a fanfic. I know artwork is fairly subjective, but I thought the art style was weirdly cartoony. Body shapes looked distorted, and facial e This is a story that could have been really cool, but unfortunately is dragged down by a lot of different aspects. The writing is weak and incredibly stilted. The water theme is overplayed and nearly every page features some sort of water/ocean quip that feels forced. Dialogue just lacks any charisma or creativity; if feels like I’m reading a hasty draft for a fanfic. I know artwork is fairly subjective, but I thought the art style was weirdly cartoony. Body shapes looked distorted, and facial expressions were often just WEIRD. Finally, the plot is just lackluster. It’s basic. It offers nothing fresh or exciting, which is annoying because it COULD have been such a fun story! I guess it was kinda funny at points, but that was just me laughing at the bad writing. Oh, and the Big Bad character? The one they make a huge deal about coming? Yeah, this character NEVER shows up. 😑 There is so much hype about this person but nothing comes of it. It’s a letdown, much like the entirety of the novel. (Also, another review points out that Miami University, which our main character wants to go to to be near the ocean, is actually in OHIO! 😂 someone obviously didn’t do their research on that one)

  28. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    As a fan of Julie Maroh, I was looking forward to this graphic novel about a queer relationship. However, there were many elements of this that did not work for me. First, the coming out component unfortunately came across as pushing someone out of the closet at worst. At best it did not pay respect to someone's own timing and needs during that important process. Second, the language was a bit stilted and didn't seem realistic. Lastly, while the setting of the DC Comic universe is interesting, w As a fan of Julie Maroh, I was looking forward to this graphic novel about a queer relationship. However, there were many elements of this that did not work for me. First, the coming out component unfortunately came across as pushing someone out of the closet at worst. At best it did not pay respect to someone's own timing and needs during that important process. Second, the language was a bit stilted and didn't seem realistic. Lastly, while the setting of the DC Comic universe is interesting, when weaved together with the narrative, everything fell a little bit flat and too bizarre. I did enjoy the art and the overall concept, but ultimately was held back from fully enjoying it. . Thanks to NetGalley and DC Comics for an advanced copy. All opinions my own.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Delfina

    The artstyle has very soft vibes and the story was nice, my only complaint would be that it isn't longer or doesn't have a second part 'cause the ending is very open, buuuut I know this is only an origins story and I'm guessing DC fans who follow the other comics know what happens to Jake in the future (as for me I'll just close my eyes and imagine Jake, Kenny and Maria stay close forever and nothing bad ever happens the end lol)

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bri

    well, that was disappointing.

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