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Killadelphia, Vol. 1: Sins of the Father

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Featuring the show-stopping talents of Spawn series artist JASON SHAWN ALEXANDER, and the writer behind such hit shows as Wu-Tang: An American Saga, Marvel's Runaways, and Starz's American Gods--RODNEY BARNES. When a small town beat cop comes home to bury his murdered father-the revered Philadelphia detective James Sangster Sr.-he begins to unravel a mystery that leads him Featuring the show-stopping talents of Spawn series artist JASON SHAWN ALEXANDER, and the writer behind such hit shows as Wu-Tang: An American Saga, Marvel's Runaways, and Starz's American Gods--RODNEY BARNES. When a small town beat cop comes home to bury his murdered father-the revered Philadelphia detective James Sangster Sr.-he begins to unravel a mystery that leads him down a path of horrors and shakes his beliefs to their core. The city that was once the symbol of liberty and freedom has fallen prey to corruption, poverty, unemployment, brutality... ...and vampires. But the mystery goes even further when Jimmy's investigation leads him to uncover the source of the outbreak is long-thought dead President of the United States John Adams--a man secretly biding his time as he builds an undead army to start a new and bloodier American revolution. There's a reason they coin a phrase, "you can't go home." Welcome to Killadelphia. Collects KILLADELPHIA #1-6


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Featuring the show-stopping talents of Spawn series artist JASON SHAWN ALEXANDER, and the writer behind such hit shows as Wu-Tang: An American Saga, Marvel's Runaways, and Starz's American Gods--RODNEY BARNES. When a small town beat cop comes home to bury his murdered father-the revered Philadelphia detective James Sangster Sr.-he begins to unravel a mystery that leads him Featuring the show-stopping talents of Spawn series artist JASON SHAWN ALEXANDER, and the writer behind such hit shows as Wu-Tang: An American Saga, Marvel's Runaways, and Starz's American Gods--RODNEY BARNES. When a small town beat cop comes home to bury his murdered father-the revered Philadelphia detective James Sangster Sr.-he begins to unravel a mystery that leads him down a path of horrors and shakes his beliefs to their core. The city that was once the symbol of liberty and freedom has fallen prey to corruption, poverty, unemployment, brutality... ...and vampires. But the mystery goes even further when Jimmy's investigation leads him to uncover the source of the outbreak is long-thought dead President of the United States John Adams--a man secretly biding his time as he builds an undead army to start a new and bloodier American revolution. There's a reason they coin a phrase, "you can't go home." Welcome to Killadelphia. Collects KILLADELPHIA #1-6

30 review for Killadelphia, Vol. 1: Sins of the Father

  1. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Peterhans

    Killadelphia is a beautifully drawn graphic novel, that is hampered by a slow, just not very interesting story. John Adams is a vampire. And he's seen how his legacy has diminished, how critical modern scholars are of said legacy. And so he's been plotting to take over the country, turning large amounts of people into vampires. He'll start by taking Philladelphia. Jimmy Sangster, a cop, returns to Philladelphia to bury his recently murdered father, James Sangster Sr - also a cop. Together with Jos Killadelphia is a beautifully drawn graphic novel, that is hampered by a slow, just not very interesting story. John Adams is a vampire. And he's seen how his legacy has diminished, how critical modern scholars are of said legacy. And so he's been plotting to take over the country, turning large amounts of people into vampires. He'll start by taking Philladelphia. Jimmy Sangster, a cop, returns to Philladelphia to bury his recently murdered father, James Sangster Sr - also a cop. Together with Jose, a pathologist, he starts investigating a spate of mysterious deaths (includings his father's). The story moves suprisingly slow - about half the book feels like set up and exposition. When things finally start to move, it's surprisingly unexciting. There are no surprises where they should be, in how Adams and his vampire army are fought. The ending feels too easy, and therefore slightly pat. Characters lack depth, and a romance is crowbarred into the story. The story involves a lot of people of colour, and a lot of cops, and yet it says so little about their terrible relation (there is one direct bit of dialogue, but it's short and is left there). But that art.. it's fantastic. 2.5 stars (Received an ARC through Edelweiss)

  2. 4 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    A pretty decent vampire tale. I appeciate that the setting was different and I also thought the dialogue wasn't bad at all. I enjoyed seeing most of these characters interact and I thought the ending was pretty solid. I wasn't in love with this art style though and the jumpy pacing actually hurt it for me. Sometimes hard to follow. But overall if want a new setting for a vampire story this was pretty solid. A 3 out of 5.

  3. 4 out of 5

    L. McCoy

    SUPER FAST REVIEW: So I read this because I picked up a variant I really liked for issue 7 (would show but it might be too bloody for Goodreads and this is my favorite social media site so I don’t wanna risk it more than I already do) when it came out and then saw Hoopla had this collection of the first 6 issues. Figured I should check it out and see if I’m adding this to my pull-list. While I don’t think I’m adding this series to a pull-list, it isn’t bad. So I found the story interesting and the SUPER FAST REVIEW: So I read this because I picked up a variant I really liked for issue 7 (would show but it might be too bloody for Goodreads and this is my favorite social media site so I don’t wanna risk it more than I already do) when it came out and then saw Hoopla had this collection of the first 6 issues. Figured I should check it out and see if I’m adding this to my pull-list. While I don’t think I’m adding this series to a pull-list, it isn’t bad. So I found the story interesting and the art to be fantastic! I also liked the creepy, bloody vampire horror with bad-ass monster designs. It has some good action too! I was confused by the political commentary (like, there’s some political vibes to a lot of the book but I was confused what the fuck the message with that is meant to be). The villain being (view spoiler)[ John Adams (hide spoiler)] , while interesting, it makes me wonder if there’s meant to be an anti-American thing. The characters are rather bland, they just seemed like they were filling a certain role for the story but with little to make me interested in them. So yeah, not bad. Might read more of the series at some point. Nothing particularly great, probably not even the most memorable horror comic but kinda interesting. 3/5

  4. 4 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    There's a plague of vampires in Philly. At their head: John Adams. He's resolved to fix America, and his own place in history, and he's got the undead army to do it. The timing of the collection's release, right after a massed viewing of Hamilton, probably doesn't help that sound like a serious pitch; still, it was Barnes' sixth viewing of the play that inspired this, and it includes a lovely little scene of Adams himself watching the show. I'm in an unusual position with Adams, in that British There's a plague of vampires in Philly. At their head: John Adams. He's resolved to fix America, and his own place in history, and he's got the undead army to do it. The timing of the collection's release, right after a massed viewing of Hamilton, probably doesn't help that sound like a serious pitch; still, it was Barnes' sixth viewing of the play that inspired this, and it includes a lovely little scene of Adams himself watching the show. I'm in an unusual position with Adams, in that British history classes tend to move on from the American Revolution after the ingrate colonials inexplicably succeed, so much of my sense of the Founding Fathers comes from the HBO miniseries John Adams, which I watched because at that point I'd try pretty much anything from HBO, and which I've only with hindsight realised was revisionist. So even if Adams here looks more John Malkovich than Paul Giamatti, I suspect I lose some of the intended incongruity. Working against Adams: the young man who comes back to town after the cop father he never saw eye to eye with dies, only to find that death doesn't actually mean he's rid of the old man yet. The pathologist who's likewise finding her bodies a lot more active lately. And a rogue vampire convinced that Adams, for all his noble rhetoric, is just repeating the errors of the past (though his own ideology sounds a lot like the kind of anarchism I'm never convinced would work with large groups of humans, let alone once you introduce an even more predatory species into the mix). And in time, other allies too; I wonder if one day Killadelphia will be regarded as a historical break point, the last time a story by a black American writer treated the use of military hardware by the police department as a good development? Which is not in any way to cast aspersions, I should add - Jordan Peele provides the front cover recommendation, and if ever there were a name one should trust on this sort of territory... I don't really know Rodney Barnes' screen work, but I have read his Marvel stuff, from which this seemed a definite step up. The real revelation, though, was the art by Jason Shawn Alexander. It's a little Dave McKean, a lot Ray Fawkes, and perfect for immersing the reader both in this declining city and the outbreaks of bloody chaos, yet then lightening up for the flashbacks and the moments of human connection. (Edelweiss ARC)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    Good story, really enjoyed this one

  6. 5 out of 5

    Thistle & Verse

    Received an ARC through Edelweiss. Opinions are my own. This comic melds horror with noir detective fiction with action. It's meant to be aesthetic fun. The art is a stand out. The dramatic poses and muted colors worked well with the melodrama. Even when blood isn't being spilled, the art of the vampires is still unsettling. I don't think the story was supposed to be that serious - megalomaniac big bad must be stopped. The characters are trope-y: hard-nosed detective dad, estranged son, love int Received an ARC through Edelweiss. Opinions are my own. This comic melds horror with noir detective fiction with action. It's meant to be aesthetic fun. The art is a stand out. The dramatic poses and muted colors worked well with the melodrama. Even when blood isn't being spilled, the art of the vampires is still unsettling. I don't think the story was supposed to be that serious - megalomaniac big bad must be stopped. The characters are trope-y: hard-nosed detective dad, estranged son, love interest. If I'd been more into the history and this genre meld, I wouldn't have minded as much, but the story wasn't doing much for me.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    Read this as single issues, but review here as the collected trade. Vampire underworld in Philadelphia. A father and son work together, with the assistance of a forensic pathologist and other random human and vampire colleagues. Vampire factions battle, and the leaders and origin of the vampire brood is a campy American history surprise. The art is pretty great - dark and horror - and propels the story. Story is still finding a full footing - not always clear what is actually happening, but intri Read this as single issues, but review here as the collected trade. Vampire underworld in Philadelphia. A father and son work together, with the assistance of a forensic pathologist and other random human and vampire colleagues. Vampire factions battle, and the leaders and origin of the vampire brood is a campy American history surprise. The art is pretty great - dark and horror - and propels the story. Story is still finding a full footing - not always clear what is actually happening, but intrigued to see where he takes this.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    A bit disappointed in this. Amazing art but the plot doesn't do much to separate itself from other vampire stuff, the pacing is way too rushed, and the characters are pretty thin. Based on the hype (mainly a blurb by Jordan Peele if I'm being honest...) I was expecting something innovative. When it comes to over used things like vampires I think you need to do a lot to stand out and Killadelphia didn't do enough to set itself apart. Searching for it here to do a review I even saw that there's an A bit disappointed in this. Amazing art but the plot doesn't do much to separate itself from other vampire stuff, the pacing is way too rushed, and the characters are pretty thin. Based on the hype (mainly a blurb by Jordan Peele if I'm being honest...) I was expecting something innovative. When it comes to over used things like vampires I think you need to do a lot to stand out and Killadelphia didn't do enough to set itself apart. Searching for it here to do a review I even saw that there's another book called Killadelphia...

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    A talented detective is murdered. A son returns to uncover the mystery behind his death. A plot centered around vampires is unraveled. As fascinating as the premise was, the story suffered immensely with each issue. There was unusual pacing that just kept on going faster and faster, tossing the reader straight into a resolution that was never properly built up. The artwork is what essentially keeps things neatly together and offers a wonderful style to the series. It's amazing to find out that the A talented detective is murdered. A son returns to uncover the mystery behind his death. A plot centered around vampires is unraveled. As fascinating as the premise was, the story suffered immensely with each issue. There was unusual pacing that just kept on going faster and faster, tossing the reader straight into a resolution that was never properly built up. The artwork is what essentially keeps things neatly together and offers a wonderful style to the series. It's amazing to find out that these were drawn based on real photos taken by real actors. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/

  10. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    Individual issue reviews: #1 | #2 | #3 | #4 | #5 | #6 Total review score: 3.08 Individual issue reviews: #1 | #2 | #3 | #4 | #5 | #6 Total review score: 3.08

  11. 4 out of 5

    Stefan Fergus

    Love the artwork, the atmosphere and the writing. It’s a premise and idea that’s kinda crazy, but it also works. Recommended.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Michael Cook

    I didn't know what to expect when I started reading Killadelphia, Rodney Barnes and Jason Shawn Alexander's new comic. I had been a fan of Barnes' work on the second season of American Gods so I was eager to take a dive into some of his other work. Killadelphia looked really interesting because I love a good vampire story and it seemed like Barnes had a unique take on the genre - and boy did he ever. Killadelphia might just be the best comic I've read all year. It's this perfect blend of absurd- I didn't know what to expect when I started reading Killadelphia, Rodney Barnes and Jason Shawn Alexander's new comic. I had been a fan of Barnes' work on the second season of American Gods so I was eager to take a dive into some of his other work. Killadelphia looked really interesting because I love a good vampire story and it seemed like Barnes had a unique take on the genre - and boy did he ever. Killadelphia might just be the best comic I've read all year. It's this perfect blend of absurd-yet-scary horror and gritty, grounded, realistic drama. In many ways, it feels old fashioned and reminiscent of film noir, but in other ways it feels startlingly modern and poignant. At first glance, Killadelphia might seem like a pretty standard mystery. In the wake of his father's death, Jimmy returns to his hometown and ends up trying to solve one of his father's unsolved cases. Of course, that investigation leads him down a slippery slope that ends in vampires. As often happens in stories of this ilk, Barnes uses this simple setup as a way of easing the reader into the story. He starts us with the story of Jimmy's fractured relationship with his father and we immediately understand why he'd be compelled to continue one of his dad's old cases. And because we understand that, we're invested in Jimmy on a personal level and are completely willing to follow him into these dark and weird corners. It's really effective and it's nice to have moments to get to know the main characters of something like this before you really put them through the ringer. And it's a rare thing to see in most mainstream comics, so I'm really glad Barnes spent the time to establish the world of Killadelphia and ground us in character drama before thrusting us into the supernatural. But, of course, everything hits the fan pretty quickly and the comic gets really weird really fast - in the best way possible. In my opinion, all of the best vampire stories have something silly about them. I mean there's just something super melodramatic about vampires; they're dark, brooding, and kind of ridiculous yet somehow still scary. Killadelphia definitely adheres to this trend. I mean, the villain is literally John Adams, who had been a vampire for over two-hundred years, and that's a really silly idea. But it also really works. It's interesting seeing how this American founding father got from where he was in the early 1800s to this melodramatic villain trying to take over the world (including some genuinely funny gags at Hamilton - both the person and the musical). Equally interesting is seeing Adams as the leader of a cult trying to change the fabric of America - by basically upholding the status quo and just changing who's in charge. If that's not an indictment of certain aspects of American politics, I don't know what is. And, somehow, Barnes manages to make all of this feel truly frightening. There's a genuine danger being posed by Adams and you can really feel how important it is for him to be defeated. It's a remarkable feat and it's so much fun to read, even if it is a little silly. However, once you get past the inherent absurdism of seeing a founding father as a vampire, it's easy to pick up on what Barnes is actually doing with this comic. While revolving around vampires, Killadelphia is less a story about them and more a story about humanity's past and its future. The idea of fractured relationships (particularly between parents and their children) is one frequently touched upon. Jimmy and has father have this palpably real relationship. There is love between them but there is also bitterness. It feels real in an almost painful way. It's one of those deeply relatable things that instantly connects you to a story. Some of my favorite scenes were between the two of them, especially towards the latter half of the comic. I'll always wish comics had more time for moments like these, but I'm so glad Barnes found a way to include them as they're honestly the heart and soul of the comic. Also important is the idea of freedom. What makes a person free? Is it freedom from poverty, freedom from oppression, freedom to live one's own life? Has American ever been free for everyone or are do those in power always try to control those who lack power? All of these questions give Killadelphia a kind of thematic heft that's often missing from other supernatural fare and these ideas are explored thoroughly in these issues, particularly in scenes between Adams and some of the vampires he commands. While I initially came to the comic for the vampires, I stayed for these meaty ideas because it's in these moments that the comic feels grounded and relatable. None of us can relate to what it's like to be a vampire, but all of us can relate to the very real problems Barnes explores throughout the comic. At the end of the day, Killadelphia is this delightful mix of melodramatic horror and gritty character drama and I loved every page of it. Every good comic is a combination of great writing and great artwork and Killadelphia is no exception. While Barnes' script is already pretty stellar, Alexander's artwork breathes life into Barnes' world. While the script luxuriates in some of the more fantastic elements, the artwork really leans into the gritty reality of the story. Alexander depicts Philadelphia as this dark, gritty city - almost like something out of a film noir. The whole thing just drips with atmosphere. It's a dark comic, visually and thematically, and Alexander does a lot of work with light and shadows - which feels wholly appropriate given the whole vampire thing. Speaking of the vampires, Alexander walks this really interesting line between depicting them as monsters and depicting them as humans. There are some vampires who still have their humanity, and he takes careful steps to ensure that's depicted, but there are other times where he leans into the more traditionally monstrous side of things. Overall, it's a really beautiful comic and Alexander's artwork elevates the script without detracting or distracting from the story being told. It's some good stuff. All in all, Killadelphia is a compelling read from start to finish. It's a brilliant mixture of tones, combining traditional vampire melodrama with the grittier tones of familial drama. It aims a magnifying glass both at America's history and at its present, examining our flaws and our potential. It's one of those comics that entertains you while also making you think. The artwork is gorgeous and moody and adds a lot of atmosphere to the story without distracting from what's going on. At the end of the day, I cannot recommend Killadelphia enough. It's one of those comics that everyone will be talking about - and rightfully so. Now's the best time to hop on the train, because a new arc is about to start and you'll want to be there for it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jake

    Vampires have always been commentary on nobles bleeding people dry. In Killadelphia however the narrative changes into one about outrage. The vampires are the ones who have been ignored or criticized by history with the second president John Adams leading them. But this isn't about vampires taking over the world, it's about the parasitic/addictive nature of outrage. At first the thrill and power to take on what's oppressed you can feel... empowering shown when a black girl takes down a corrupt c Vampires have always been commentary on nobles bleeding people dry. In Killadelphia however the narrative changes into one about outrage. The vampires are the ones who have been ignored or criticized by history with the second president John Adams leading them. But this isn't about vampires taking over the world, it's about the parasitic/addictive nature of outrage. At first the thrill and power to take on what's oppressed you can feel... empowering shown when a black girl takes down a corrupt cop who would sexually assault her. Later in the series it's apparent that despite their attempts to change things, Adams plan is rooted in the same principles as the problems he says he's against. In short it's just a means to get attention and appreciation after years of obscurity. His wife Abigail in the meantime has become a straw feminist and seeks to use her influence to put herself on top. Outrage much like the bloodlust is addictive, it draws people in to further someone else's cause. The illusion has never been more relevant a the time of this series publishing. Following father and son detectives it shows the alternatives to the vampires' ideologies. After years of never seeing eye to eye they have a rocky foundation. Yet it's their shared sense of duty that shows how stable they are in comparison to the vampires. It's only by both acknowledging one another's faults and finding a middle ground that some form of piece can be achieved. Compare that to burning down the foundations only to replace everything with the same (if parallel) systems of oppression. Just the ghastly artwork with at times chaotic panels show how tense the situations are. It's like things are ready to fall apart and burn to ash. Yet there's still a foundation and the story finishes not with a clean slate but acknowledging that the influence of the vampires still exist. My only actual complaint comes from how the characters are more or less vehicles for the plot rather than being in plot. Especially with a romance that comes out of nowhere.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    Not for the first time, the vampire trope is used to discuss America, Americans and Americanism, when a nest of the undead is discovered in a black slum in Philadelphia. I'll leave to you to discover the peculiar source and raison d'etre (if vampires can be said to ever etre, that is) of this particular variant, but you'll certainly never see a picture of the FLOTUS like you get here. The big bad, suitably given a modern-era Michael Stipe gauntness, is a little too bland and ill-defined, which d Not for the first time, the vampire trope is used to discuss America, Americans and Americanism, when a nest of the undead is discovered in a black slum in Philadelphia. I'll leave to you to discover the peculiar source and raison d'etre (if vampires can be said to ever etre, that is) of this particular variant, but you'll certainly never see a picture of the FLOTUS like you get here. The big bad, suitably given a modern-era Michael Stipe gauntness, is a little too bland and ill-defined, which doesn't really provide for a perfect examination of the issues the book wants to raise. I think it's aiming for a kind of discussion of white privilege (bleurgh), and how people are downtrodden until they're squeezed so hard only fear comes out. Those concerns nudge their way on to the pages, but over all is the sense that the vampire 'life' might be the best thing if you're stuck in a shithole surrounded by drugs and violence any which way you look. I liked the dynamic of the heroic trio here, too, although the daddy issues stuff did little for me – but if we're discussing how the book generates a sexiness about being a vampire, then it has to be said the ending is obvious. Nobody gets a wardrobe like that and fails to boss the sequel. At least that's a welcome sequel I'm already looking forward to.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Randy

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. First off, Jason Shawn Alexander's art is absolutely stunning. Otherwise, I'm conflicted with this book. I was really excited for this book, was hoping for something really groundbreaking & original. The premise is interesting, but the execution not so much. There is alot of laying the ground work & set building - then when it peaks it feels like a let down. The elder Sangster investigates deaths that all are drained of blood & had Yellow Fever & so did John Adams - coincidence nope he is a vamp First off, Jason Shawn Alexander's art is absolutely stunning. Otherwise, I'm conflicted with this book. I was really excited for this book, was hoping for something really groundbreaking & original. The premise is interesting, but the execution not so much. There is alot of laying the ground work & set building - then when it peaks it feels like a let down. The elder Sangster investigates deaths that all are drained of blood & had Yellow Fever & so did John Adams - coincidence nope he is a vampire just seems like an odd intuitive leap. Then son reads dead dad's journal about vampires, let's go dig dear old dad up just for curiosity sake - another odd leap to extremes. Just feels like these ideas should have had some connective tissue to make these judgements not feel so abrupt & nonsensical. The whole romance subplot also felt disjointed & forced.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Alan

    I know I've said I'm burned out on vampire stories, and in many ways I am. So, why would I recommend this collection of the first issues in this, relatively, new series. Many factors not introduced in vampire stories are used here, along with some of the usual tropes. The relationship issues between James Sangster Sr. and james Sangster Jr. I thought worked. As did the introduction of vampires from the city's ghetto and the role they were expected to play in the elite vampire plans. Toss in some A I know I've said I'm burned out on vampire stories, and in many ways I am. So, why would I recommend this collection of the first issues in this, relatively, new series. Many factors not introduced in vampire stories are used here, along with some of the usual tropes. The relationship issues between James Sangster Sr. and james Sangster Jr. I thought worked. As did the introduction of vampires from the city's ghetto and the role they were expected to play in the elite vampire plans. Toss in some American history and this was pleasant surprise.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Steph Myers

    I'm torn. I'm between a three and a two. There is well-paced action and suspense. It's got some pretty creepy scenes, but good. The only reason I'm giving two is my struggle with the story line. Really, there is only one part of the story line that I struggle with: John Adams. For some reason, I think I would have liked some random and obscure historical figure and the head vamp bad guy. I don't know why it bugs me. The art is good for the story. It is gritty and at times takes on a photo qualit I'm torn. I'm between a three and a two. There is well-paced action and suspense. It's got some pretty creepy scenes, but good. The only reason I'm giving two is my struggle with the story line. Really, there is only one part of the story line that I struggle with: John Adams. For some reason, I think I would have liked some random and obscure historical figure and the head vamp bad guy. I don't know why it bugs me. The art is good for the story. It is gritty and at times takes on a photo quality. I will read 2 and see if I get sucked in. Pun intended.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Colin Mcclusick

    Got to love a story that take place in philly, and has vampires. Extremely fun take on vampires in America. The main characters were cool and it had an interesting combination with magic. Without giving anything away, I really enjoyed how they made the villain a popular historic figure; and thought it was creative how they made it react with things that are happening today. Overall 8/10 it was a quick read and a good comic. I would recommend to anyone that is looking for a cool vampire story.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Flow Chi Minh

    Interesting premise but still took a bit to get me wrapped in. I think this series has a high ceiling once its rolling. Vampires have been in Philly since the dawn of America and a long game type plan by one of the country's forefathers turned bloodsucker is about to flip the City of Brotherly Love upside down. It's up to a cop,his estranged detective dad , and a coroner to put the kibosh on the potential apocalypse. Art is gorgeous and pushed it from three to four stars.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Alican Kunt

    A fresh take on the same old vampire story. But it’s still an old story. I would much rather prefer an original monster/disease story that is not related to any known fantasy horror tales. That being said the story is good, the plot is nicely crafted and the artwork is just fascinating. Totally recommend to fellow comic book appreciators out there.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Greg Trosclair

    Really great story and art come together to bring us a very creative. In a genre that feels like it has been relatively plumbed of good stories comes Killadelphia a thoroughly inventive vampire story. I loved the rich back story plus a really engaging current story. The art is lovely and does a great job conveying the story.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    I picked this up because of JSA, and new cause Jordan Peele gave it a rave review. It started out slow, but from about halfway through issue #4, I was hooked. In retrospect, the slow start is probably justified, otherwise the later issues wouldn’t make much sense or have any emotional value. I’ll definitely plan to pick up the next trade. It also makes me want to re-read The Strain.

  23. 5 out of 5

    James

    4.5 stars rounded up to 5. Amazing -- and genuinely scary! -- comic. Can't wait for more of this story arc in a second volume. No idea where it could go from here! I understand the movie rights to KILLADELPHIA have already been purchased by bigtime Hollywood players. That's great news, because this will make one hell of a scary movie in the right hands!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jayo Leavesby

    Exciting graphic novel. Great art! Some very interesting characters (“I know him!”). Confusing beginning, and ending felt slightly rushed too. But some good emotional payoff. The “magic” was a bit too soft for me, and I wish it were explained more. Ends on a bit of a cliff hanger too. I want to read the next bit it’s not high on my list.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Simon Workman

    3.5. Great characters and fantastic art. I like the premise of the story, but it felt kind of rushed, especially the ending. I’ll keep reading the issues when they come out, though—the set-up for the second arc seems promising.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Damian Mxyzptlk

    Really cool art, good story, and single issue pacing that doesn't allow time for more nuance in characterization, which would definitely make it better. Which is just to say that I like it enough to wish it was longer and took more time to showcase the art and let the story breathe.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Woowott

    At was quite something to look at. Concept was fun. I liked Tevin quite a lot, but I wanted more of him and the vampires with whom he hung out and then fell out. Less cop, less Adams, more Abigail and Brittany. But the cop thing was the biggest party, and it left me cold.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Stennett

    The art made me pick it up because it’s stunning. The story, as Barnes actually admits, is not terribly original, but still quite enjoyable. I look forward to further books. (You’ll never think about Abigail Adams quite the same way again.)

  29. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    Glorious!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Marquelon

    I can’t say enough good things about this title!

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