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Remain in Love: Talking Heads, Tom Tom Club, Tina

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Two iconic bands. An unforgettable life. One of the most dynamic groups of the '70s and '80s, Talking Heads, founded by drummer Chris Frantz, his girlfriend Tina Weymouth, and lead singer David Byrne, burst onto the music scene, playing at CBGBs, touring Europe with the Ramones, and creating hits like "Psycho Killer" and "Burning Down the House" that captured the post-baby Two iconic bands. An unforgettable life. One of the most dynamic groups of the '70s and '80s, Talking Heads, founded by drummer Chris Frantz, his girlfriend Tina Weymouth, and lead singer David Byrne, burst onto the music scene, playing at CBGBs, touring Europe with the Ramones, and creating hits like "Psycho Killer" and "Burning Down the House" that captured the post-baby boom generation's intense, affectless style. In Remain in Love, Frantz writes about the beginnings of Talking Heads--their days as art students in Providence, moving to the sparse Chrystie Street loft Frantz, Weymouth, and Byrne shared where the music that defined an era was written. With never-before-seen photos and immersive vivid detail, Frantz describes life on tour, down to the meals eaten and the clothes worn--and reveals the mechanics of a long and complicated working relationship with a mercurial frontman. At the heart of Remain in Love is Frantz's love for Weymouth: their once-in-a-lifetime connection as lovers, musicians, and bandmates, and how their creativity surged with the creation of their own band Tom Tom Club, bringing a fresh Afro-Caribbean beat to hits like "Genius of Love." Studded with memorable places and names from the era--Grace Jones, Andy Warhol, Stephen Sprouse, Lou Reed, Brian Eno, and Debbie Harry among them--Remain in Love is a frank and open memoir of an emblematic life in music and in love.


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Two iconic bands. An unforgettable life. One of the most dynamic groups of the '70s and '80s, Talking Heads, founded by drummer Chris Frantz, his girlfriend Tina Weymouth, and lead singer David Byrne, burst onto the music scene, playing at CBGBs, touring Europe with the Ramones, and creating hits like "Psycho Killer" and "Burning Down the House" that captured the post-baby Two iconic bands. An unforgettable life. One of the most dynamic groups of the '70s and '80s, Talking Heads, founded by drummer Chris Frantz, his girlfriend Tina Weymouth, and lead singer David Byrne, burst onto the music scene, playing at CBGBs, touring Europe with the Ramones, and creating hits like "Psycho Killer" and "Burning Down the House" that captured the post-baby boom generation's intense, affectless style. In Remain in Love, Frantz writes about the beginnings of Talking Heads--their days as art students in Providence, moving to the sparse Chrystie Street loft Frantz, Weymouth, and Byrne shared where the music that defined an era was written. With never-before-seen photos and immersive vivid detail, Frantz describes life on tour, down to the meals eaten and the clothes worn--and reveals the mechanics of a long and complicated working relationship with a mercurial frontman. At the heart of Remain in Love is Frantz's love for Weymouth: their once-in-a-lifetime connection as lovers, musicians, and bandmates, and how their creativity surged with the creation of their own band Tom Tom Club, bringing a fresh Afro-Caribbean beat to hits like "Genius of Love." Studded with memorable places and names from the era--Grace Jones, Andy Warhol, Stephen Sprouse, Lou Reed, Brian Eno, and Debbie Harry among them--Remain in Love is a frank and open memoir of an emblematic life in music and in love.

30 review for Remain in Love: Talking Heads, Tom Tom Club, Tina

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ian

    Back in the late seventies and early eighties I used to listen to the albums released by Talking Heads. I really liked some of their songs but thought others were just so-so. I never saw them live, but in 1984 I went to the cinema to see the concert film “Stop Making Sense” which I thought was absolutely fantastic. I still play some of my favourite songs from that film. One of the things I liked about this book was that it also reminded me of some of the band’s songs that came after that period, Back in the late seventies and early eighties I used to listen to the albums released by Talking Heads. I really liked some of their songs but thought others were just so-so. I never saw them live, but in 1984 I went to the cinema to see the concert film “Stop Making Sense” which I thought was absolutely fantastic. I still play some of my favourite songs from that film. One of the things I liked about this book was that it also reminded me of some of the band’s songs that came after that period, like “Road to Nowhere” and “Puzzlin’ Evidence”. I had completely forgotten about those and have now been playing them again. The first forty pages of this book were about Chris Frantz’s childhood and adolescence, and to be honest I found this opening section a bit boring. I was here to read about Talking Heads, and the text livened up once it got to the author attending the Rhode Island School of Design, where he met Tina Weymouth and David Byrne. The story of the band’s early years in New York was one of the most interesting parts, not just for how Talking Heads developed but because in the early 70s they hung around artists and bands like Debbie Harry, The Ramones and Mink DeVille, who were also just starting out. Later on Talking Heads developed links with The B-52s, another band I was keen on at the time. You get the impression from the book that Chris Frantz is the sort of guy who goes “all in” in whatever he feels and does. The positive side of this is that he is passionate in adoring his wife and fellow band member Tina Weymouth, whom he married in 1977, and that he was passionate about Talking Heads whilst the band existed. The downside is that he is also passionate about how much he loathes David Byrne, even 30 years after Talking Heads broke up. In most people these feelings lessen over time, but clearly not with Chris Frantz. In this book he never misses an opportunity to stick the knife into Byrne, much of it done in an embittered tone that doesn’t do Frantz himself any favours. He doesn’t say much about Jerry Harrison, but I get the impression relations weren’t great with him either. I felt the book was a bit unbalanced in that most of it was taken up with the early years of the band, and there was comparatively little coverage of what happened during the eighties. Late in the book we get a clue about why this might be, in that Frantz suddenly admits that by the 80s he had a major drug problem, so much so that Tina Weymouth gave him an ultimatum to shape up or their marriage was over. There are hints of this drug problem throughout the book, but the true extent of it is revealed only near the end and is covered in a page or so. I’m glad Chris Frantz has gotten over this, but I was left wondering how much he remembered of the period. I wouldn’t say Chris Frantz is the greatest writer. His artistic talents lie in another direction. Parts of the book are taken up with descriptions of live shows and the audience reaction, so that there are passages like “We played the xyz nightclub and got a great audience reaction. The next night we played abc theatre but received only polite applause.” For all that, the book is reasonably interesting for fans of Talking Heads, if marred somewhat by the author’s bitterness towards David Byrne. It may be true that Byrne is the selfish, egocentric, prima donna that he’s portrayed as in the book. However, decades of managing staff disputes in my own work setting have taught me to listen to both sides of a story before coming to a firm opinion.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    Chris Frantz ends his autobiography by explaining that he's not a person who "moves on" from friends and family. Instead, he "remains" and "remains in love." Chris Frantz and his wife Tina Weymouth have been a matched set for over forty years since they met at the famed art college RISD and formed the rhythm section (drums and bass respectively) a unique and original band with classmate David Byrne and later Jerry Harrison. This is not just another rock legend biography, but a lifelong love stor Chris Frantz ends his autobiography by explaining that he's not a person who "moves on" from friends and family. Instead, he "remains" and "remains in love." Chris Frantz and his wife Tina Weymouth have been a matched set for over forty years since they met at the famed art college RISD and formed the rhythm section (drums and bass respectively) a unique and original band with classmate David Byrne and later Jerry Harrison. This is not just another rock legend biography, but a lifelong love story as well. Although as with most of these rock star biographies, there are times Chris gets bogged down in the details of each tour, it is a fascinating and well-written book that takes us from Chris' childhood through his college years and the big adventure moving to the Bowery with Tina and David. And not signing a record contract till they were ready even though they wrote Psycho Killer years before it debuted on the radio, timed with amazing synchronicity as the Son of Sam (David Berkowitz) haunted the NYC streets. Their first world tour is across Europe opening for the Ramones. Some of us perhaps never made the connection that the Tom Tom Club was Chris and Tina's solo project when Byrne and Jerry went to do solo albums. A completely different sound, an explosive beat, and they toured at least once with their second band opening for their first. Of course, it's not all wine and roses as the book details Byrne's habit of taking credit for group lyrics and being the face of the Talking Heads. But, Chris and Tina's story is powerful in a world of short lived rock and roll marriages how they remained together creating On and off stage. Many thanks to the publisher for providing a copy for review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Martin

    This is the 4th rock autobiography I've read or listened to (Peart, Helm, R. Robinson). By far, it is the worst. If we add up everything Frantz writes about meals eaten 40 years ago in restaurants that no longer exist and compare that to what he writes about Jerry Harrison, the restaurants win the word count competition by a large margin. How could Frantz not get a damned editor? It is clear from reviews of this book, for instance in the WSJ, that the reviewers did not actually read this book. Ch This is the 4th rock autobiography I've read or listened to (Peart, Helm, R. Robinson). By far, it is the worst. If we add up everything Frantz writes about meals eaten 40 years ago in restaurants that no longer exist and compare that to what he writes about Jerry Harrison, the restaurants win the word count competition by a large margin. How could Frantz not get a damned editor? It is clear from reviews of this book, for instance in the WSJ, that the reviewers did not actually read this book. Chris' editor should have said/suggested/demanded: "Chris, you've know Jerry Harrison for 40 years. Come up with 10 pages of stuff to write about him. Are you guys friends?" "Chris, you never studied music before starting Talking Heads, but you became a successful producer, write about that." "Chris, no one gives a goddamn that a person you met is related to or interacted with someone who was famous but whom you never met, and you fall into providing this useless information 100 times." "Chris, lots of people want to know about your style, method, approach to, or philosophy of drumming. You have to write a few pages about that, because to drummers, this is VERY important." "Chris, lots of people want to know about your style, method, approach to, or philosophy of producing other people's recordings. You have to write a few pages about that and how you split the work with Tina." "Chris, lots of people want to know a little about the economics of being a rock star without many publishing rights. You need to touch on this with more than the story of Tina counting the money before you were a hit. Did you get rich? You went from not enough money for lunch to buying a yacht and multiple homes, but you're not on the credits as the writer. Where's the money come from?" "Chris, no one cares, NO ONE, about the dressing you had on a salad 40 years ago." "Chris, you took a lot of drugs. When you had kids, did you feel differently about drugs? You mention that Tina did, but how did you FEEL? What do you think?" "Chris, why didn't you make more Tom Tom Club music?" "Chris, Talking Heads ended 30 years ago. You need more than 3% of your book to be about this half of your life. You wrote more about what you ate while touring for 'Talking Heads: 77' than you wrote about 30 years of your life." "Chris, what does a rock star say to his 16-year-old kid? What kind of father are you?" "Chris, your book will be much better if you drop 100 fewer names and provide 100 fewer menus from meals." "Chris, what do you do for fun? What do you read? Do you still paint? Where do you live? Have you kicked drugs? Do you still drum? Is there anything left in the music tank?"

  4. 4 out of 5

    Geoff

    Talking Heads are one of my favorite bands of all time, so I was very interested to read this memoir account by drummer Chris Frantz. Frantz and his wife Tina Weymouth were the rhythm section for the Heads and the creative partnership behind Tom Tom Club, and their marriage and relationship really created a steady foundation for the band and their lives. David Byrne comes off pretty badly in this book ("David is a person incapable of returning friendship") and I think some of that comes down to Talking Heads are one of my favorite bands of all time, so I was very interested to read this memoir account by drummer Chris Frantz. Frantz and his wife Tina Weymouth were the rhythm section for the Heads and the creative partnership behind Tom Tom Club, and their marriage and relationship really created a steady foundation for the band and their lives. David Byrne comes off pretty badly in this book ("David is a person incapable of returning friendship") and I think some of that comes down to different values and outlooks on life. From this telling, Frantz treated the Heads as a family that produced great music together while Byrne (in this telling) saw it as a way to create good music/art and left when his ambition and plans outgrew the band, a more business outlook that would not mix well with Franz's approach. I loved Franz's description of the energy of playing live, the relationships he formed with other bands, and the details of studio recording, but I would have loved hearing more about how they came up with the music. Frantz also comes off as somewhat bourgeoisie for a rock star, with discussions of real estate, celebrity encounters, and listing of menus at music industry soirees, but that also matches well with his family and comfort values (the cocaine habit maybe not). There was way too much commentary about females' appearances; came off as a bit creepy. It's also strange the there's very little discussion of Jerry Harrison in the book compared to the other bandmates. But in the end, Talking Heads made amazing music, the book is very interesting and listenable, and while Byrne maybe the cooler and more artistic one, Frantz and Weymouth are the ones I'd rather be friends with. **Thanks to the author, publisher, and NetGalley for a free copy in exchange for an honest review.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lee

    Inevitably, David Byrne comes across as a complete jerk here, and the pages are filled with either examples of Byrne's petty, obnoxious behaviour or the (soon to be fulfilled) expectation of yet more Dave acting like a tw*t. Despite this -- and maybe a little too much sketchy 'Gee, X was really nice/not so great'(Bob Geldof makes a fleeting appearance being his usual 'charming' self) -- there's plenty of stuff about making those great records, the amazing list of collaborators (Johnny Marr - 'Gr Inevitably, David Byrne comes across as a complete jerk here, and the pages are filled with either examples of Byrne's petty, obnoxious behaviour or the (soon to be fulfilled) expectation of yet more Dave acting like a tw*t. Despite this -- and maybe a little too much sketchy 'Gee, X was really nice/not so great'(Bob Geldof makes a fleeting appearance being his usual 'charming' self) -- there's plenty of stuff about making those great records, the amazing list of collaborators (Johnny Marr - 'Great guy' - flies over to do a guitar solo on one of their best songs, joins them for a bit of 'herb' then gets back on a plane) and the CBGB origins to keep geek-fans interested. -- 'In early 1992, our office received a call from the management of the Happy Mondays. They asked if Tina and I were available to produce their new record. The truth is that all we knew about the Happy Mondays was that they were a band from Manchester, UK, and had a string of hits on Tony Wilson’s Factory Records. We had known Tony Wilson a bit and we liked him very much so we agreed to meet with the band’s manager, Nathan McGough, and the bass player, Paul Ryder. In fact, they took the train up from New York City to Connecticut to meet with us. Nathan and Paul stressed the fact that the band wanted to actually play the songs on their new record, and of course they got no argument from us about that. It seems their previous couple of albums had been very successfully produced by DJs who took snippets of the band’s recordings and then looped them into a dance groove that was programmed. You see, this was the time of Nirvana, the era of grunge, long, stringy hair, and flannel shirts. There was great emphasis put on keeping the music raw and unfiltered, kind of like punk but without the discipline. In fact, grunge was the antithesis of the whole Manchester dance-music thing. So Tina and I said yeah, we can dig that. You want to play on your own records? You want to make the record in Barbados? Let’s do it. No one gave us any idea what we were getting ourselves into. When the band arrived very late one night, we were in for a bit of a shock. They came straight from the airport and informed us that Paul’s brother, front man Shaun Ryder, had dropped and broken his six-week supply of methadone at the Manchester Airport. Nathan McGough described the scene of Sean on his hands and knees licking up as much of the methadone as he could from the floor of the airport. By the time they arrived in Barbados, Shaun was dope sick and the entire band and entourage of wives, girlfriends, and the Ryders’ parents were in a state of anxious exhaustion. Nobody had told us about Shaun’s bad habits. If Tina and I had been different types of people we would have quit right then and there. Instead, we tried to help everyone get settled in. Some of the band was staying in the studio’s residential quarters; the rest were staying in private cottages at Sam Lord’s Castle, a luxury resort several miles away. We told everyone to get a good night’s sleep and tomorrow we would begin setting up to record. The following day, we waited for the band’s gear to be delivered from the airport. While we were hanging out, trying to get to know each other and understand the band’s Mancunian accents, we heard screaming from outside the studio. The studio was very private, surrounded by sugar cane fields and located way back from the main road. What the ruckus was about was that Mark “Bez” Berry, the band’s dancer and maraca shaker, had been doing donuts with his newly rented open-air Jeep in the sugar cane field and flipped the car, which landed right on his upper arm, shattering it and nearly cutting it off completely. Somebody brought Bez into the studio lounge while we tried to get an emergency doctor on the phone. I remember Tina staying with Bez and trying to hold his arm together while everyone else tried not to freak out. Tina was a steady presence no matter what was happening. His arm looked really, really bad. Eventually, an ambulance arrived and took Bez to the hospital. When he returned later that evening his arm was held together with some contraption resembling the Brooklyn Bridge. Of course, Shaun wanted Bez’s painkillers. While we were in the studio with the band, Shaun made a discovery. While there was no heroin available in Barbados, there was loads of crack cocaine. He was supposed to be writing lyrics but Shaun managed to find a dealer and he began smoking rocks of crack instead. He tried to hide this from everybody else—as if we wouldn’t notice. One evening the percussionist, Bruce Martin, found Shaun loading furniture from the guesthouse at Blue Wave Studios into the back of his car—to trade for crack. Bruce had to physically restrain Shaun from doing so. Shaun drove off without the furniture and no one had any idea where he had gone until the following day, when he called for someone to come and get him. He had driven his rental car right though a plate-glass window into the living room of some poor lady’s home. In only a few weeks, the Mondays had managed to wreck five cars.'

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tosh

    Kimley and I on our podcast BOOK MUSIK discuss the Chris Frantz memoir. I was disappointed with the book. Hear the podcast here: Book Musik podcast Kimley and I on our podcast BOOK MUSIK discuss the Chris Frantz memoir. I was disappointed with the book. Hear the podcast here: Book Musik podcast

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kasa Cotugno

    I thoroughly enjoyed Chris Frantz's version of the beginnings of one of my favorite groups, Talking Heads. I came to them late, and was a great fan of the film Stop Making Sense, particularly when it returned to San Francisco as part of the SF Film Festival on the occasion of its 15th anniversary. All "Heads" were there as well as director Jonathan Demme. But Chris has dedicated this book to his partner in life, Tina Weymouth, for a reason. To this day they remain a true collaboration, and he cr I thoroughly enjoyed Chris Frantz's version of the beginnings of one of my favorite groups, Talking Heads. I came to them late, and was a great fan of the film Stop Making Sense, particularly when it returned to San Francisco as part of the SF Film Festival on the occasion of its 15th anniversary. All "Heads" were there as well as director Jonathan Demme. But Chris has dedicated this book to his partner in life, Tina Weymouth, for a reason. To this day they remain a true collaboration, and he credits her contributions to their music as well as to their lives. Their relationship with David Byrne in forming the band was problematic from the beginning, but they exhibited extreme patience in the name of holding their band together by putting up with Byrne's mercurial behavior and hogging of credit for artistic input. While it doesn't change my opinion of Byrne, it does bring this beautiful couple out of the shadows for me.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Field

    I should start by saying I truly think Chris Frantz is an amazing drummer and has always seemed to me a good person. There's something wonderful about the enduring love he has with Tina, and it is made very obvious in this book. However, this might be one of the worst memoirs I've ever read. Frantz is a creative person, but that does not make one a good writer or memoirist. And I don't necessarily blame Frantz - it is far harder than it seems to write a good music memoir, but it almost feels like I should start by saying I truly think Chris Frantz is an amazing drummer and has always seemed to me a good person. There's something wonderful about the enduring love he has with Tina, and it is made very obvious in this book. However, this might be one of the worst memoirs I've ever read. Frantz is a creative person, but that does not make one a good writer or memoirist. And I don't necessarily blame Frantz - it is far harder than it seems to write a good music memoir, but it almost feels like there was no editor around to help guide him into making a better book. A quick list of issues: -Frantz describes everyone based on how attractive they were. Everyone, it seems, was gorgeous. -A lot of namedropping of random people in his life, plus namedropping of famous people he ran into (whose function most of the time is just to be a famous person who has shown up) -literally so much detail about Talking Heads' 1977 European tour that I started to laugh. Literally every show was amazing. Literally every show had three encores. Literally every bed he and Tina slept in was tough. Johnny Ramone was a bully and didn't like European food. I'm guessing Frantz referred to some journals from this time, but good lord it was boring. -I saw another review that mentions that while there were issues with David Byrne that are clearly laid out, it almost feels like Jerry Harrison barely existed (outside of a tough time in Harrison's life before being able to bounce back) -Frantz talks about getting help for a drug problem almost in passing as if it wasn't a big deal. -Zero discussion of anything that happened in the late nineties, all the way up to present day, save for the induction into the Rock n Roll Hall of Fame. -For no real reason, Frantz tells a story about John Martyn being abusive in Bahamas. -The way Frantz wrote what happened after the Rock Hall party with David Byrne, and then a quick concluding paragraph and the book is over. The tone was outright bizarre. Had this book been shortened to half its length, with most of the minute details culled, it might have been a little bit better as a book. It is nice to hear from his perspective, as Byrne has spent most of the last 25 years in a bigger spotlight, and not really given the other band members the space to talk. To be honest, I bet Byrne would read the book and agree with everything Frantz said. It doesn't make me love Byrne or Frantz any less - they're both flawed and that's fine. But Byrne's How Music Works is a significantly better book (even though the purpose of his was different), because it was just better written. I'm mostly sad this book isn't better. I was very excited to read it but it was at times written so badly I wondered if I should stop. That's never a good sign when reading about a band someone loves...

  9. 5 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    The author of this book, Charton Christopher Frantz, starts by saying not many books about his main band, Talking Heads, were much cop. Well, in a way this isn't either, but it at least is an official volume. What's more, I think you can easily declare this has not been ghostwritten. There's an almost blunt, direct stylelessness about the memoir that proves he's not the ultimate purveyor of wordsmithery. The shot game for this book will kill you, if you imbibe every time a girl is rated by her l The author of this book, Charton Christopher Frantz, starts by saying not many books about his main band, Talking Heads, were much cop. Well, in a way this isn't either, but it at least is an official volume. What's more, I think you can easily declare this has not been ghostwritten. There's an almost blunt, direct stylelessness about the memoir that proves he's not the ultimate purveyor of wordsmithery. The shot game for this book will kill you, if you imbibe every time a girl is rated by her looks (luckily, every one he can remember is gorgeous – and a lot of the blokes get a compliment, too). This does seem to stop, however, when he finally narrates his nuptials. We have to accept this is an attempt at the definitive story, so accept a lot of fan-only detail of his childhood (military family moving around a lot, lots of private education) and college years. The shithole of the loft apartment Chris, Tina and David Byrne tried to live in while the Heads were a trio shows some of what the band has had to work through, private and art college schooling regardless. And then, on the basis of one single, copious live sets and an unfinished debut album, they toured France and Britain with the Ramones, which is again in forensic detail. You might take against this as a bit of name-dropping; I call it a minor marvel when Damon Albarn, working nights at a round-the-clock hotel bar, mentions he's got a band – especially as this is 1977 and he is nine years old. So this is a mixed bag – the Head head will learn just as much about who did what at the author's wedding as they could ever care to, all the while praying for more than the gnomic dripfeed of What Went Wrong With the Band. By the end, with all the depth of detail, there's so little mention of Jerry Harrison, you might be led to believe there was a beef in that direction, and not just with what we are told was Byrne's irreparable selfishness. (They don't seem to have been really social together – it's unclear, but I don't think the full band were at Chris and Tina's wedding, and four people so allegedly close never seemed to really be connected outside of work.) But also by the end our guide to all this does seem a likeable and reliable narrator, telling us how the band managed to do more albums than the guy on the street might remember, and how he and Tina managed to work so well outside the Talking Heads world – even when Happy Mondays proved to be pretty much their worst nightmare come true. So by the end you do just about manage to forgive the nitpicking delivery of the early chapters, and appreciate the story for what it is. It might have been a lot shorter, it might have been a lot more subjective, but I was still grateful to read it. Three and a half stars.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Elle

    I finally finished reading Remain In Love, the book by Chris Frantz, drummer for Talking Heads and Tom Tom Club. Man, I did not like this book at all. I can pretty much summarize this book by the 3 main themes that run through the book. Let me save you the trouble of reading 400 pages. 1. Chris Frantz is totally over the top in love with his wife Tina Weymouth and has been since they were both at Rhode Island School of Design. 2. He really hates David Byrne and doesn’t try to sugarcoat how he fee I finally finished reading Remain In Love, the book by Chris Frantz, drummer for Talking Heads and Tom Tom Club. Man, I did not like this book at all. I can pretty much summarize this book by the 3 main themes that run through the book. Let me save you the trouble of reading 400 pages. 1. Chris Frantz is totally over the top in love with his wife Tina Weymouth and has been since they were both at Rhode Island School of Design. 2. He really hates David Byrne and doesn’t try to sugarcoat how he feels like he was mistreated and lied to, and DB was not the genius behind the band. 3. He’s white and privileged. I think if I had read this book a month ago, the 3rd theme would not have stood out as much. Chris Frantz is from a small town in Kentucky and boy does it show in his perspective of things. I have to admit, I’m not a huge fan of Talking Heads. I like a few songs but I’m more of a casual listener than a fan. I wanted to read this because I was interested to read about CBGB’s in the late 70s. All Chris Frantz does though is shit on Joey Ramone about how awful a person he was and talk about how David Byrne stole lyrics and writing credits from him. Reading this did not make me a fan. The first 70 pages or so are all these mundane stories about his friends growing up. He’s like your granny who tells you all about these people she knows but you couldn’t care less about. I almost stopped reading because it was such a slog. I really didn’t need to know about all the different apartments that he lived in while he was at RISD! The most interesting thing about the book? I found out that I stayed in the same hotel in Amsterdam as they did on their first tour of Europe. Cool, huh?

  11. 5 out of 5

    Quirkyreader

    First off, I won this in a goodreads giveaway. Thank you St. Martin’s press. The irony of this book is that I constantly have Tom Tom Club and Talking Heads Songs stuck in my head. Mostly “Gangster of Love” “Road To Nowhere” and their cover of “Take Me To The River”. In this book Chris Frantz talks about his life and how his bands and Tina are the most important to him. What I enjoyed most about this book was the CBGB “years”. That time is one of my favourites in late 20th Century art and music. Fr First off, I won this in a goodreads giveaway. Thank you St. Martin’s press. The irony of this book is that I constantly have Tom Tom Club and Talking Heads Songs stuck in my head. Mostly “Gangster of Love” “Road To Nowhere” and their cover of “Take Me To The River”. In this book Chris Frantz talks about his life and how his bands and Tina are the most important to him. What I enjoyed most about this book was the CBGB “years”. That time is one of my favourites in late 20th Century art and music. Frantz mentions the artists and musicians that he met during this time. Give this book a go, and read about the things that Frantz participated in and saw.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

    ARC received from NetGalley for review My initial reaction on finishing Chris Frantz's memoir came as a wave of relief, a feeling of happiness for having read a story steeped mainly in positivity while we continue to ride out COVID. Coming off books weighed down by heartbreaks (Open Book) and heroin (Slowhand), I was ready for something to lift me. I figured I couldn't go wrong with the story of a co-founder of an awesome band who's still in love with his awesome co-founder wife after forty-plus ARC received from NetGalley for review My initial reaction on finishing Chris Frantz's memoir came as a wave of relief, a feeling of happiness for having read a story steeped mainly in positivity while we continue to ride out COVID. Coming off books weighed down by heartbreaks (Open Book) and heroin (Slowhand), I was ready for something to lift me. I figured I couldn't go wrong with the story of a co-founder of an awesome band who's still in love with his awesome co-founder wife after forty-plus years. This is not to say you're getting 400 pages of unicorns and gummy bears in Remain In Love. While Frantz gives a straightforward and easygoing voice to his memoir, there's an underlying restraint in the passages that discuss the speed bumps in his journey - about 90% of which involve David Byrne (Johnny Ramone makes up some of the difference). Frantz's life is quite a learning experience, especially for those intent on pursuing a career in music. Though I went into Remain in Love knowing next to nothing about the band (and Frantz emphasizes here that what books exists aren't wholly accurate - par for the course), I suspected I'd find some history of "us versus him" when recounting work with Byrne. That Frantz is able to handle conflicts with song ownership and contracts with calm is very admirable, and even in his writing he doesn't paint pictures of villains. Remain in Love is a fun history of the Talking Heads, Frantz and Weymouth's long relationship and their Tom Tom Club projects. It is bit of a non-linear story, so be warned if that rankles. The highlight for me was Frantz's steel-trap recall of the Heads' European tour with the Ramones early in their career, a micro-history within the era of CBGB, early MTV, and a band that straddled rock and punk so well. If you're a fan, you'll come away from Remain in Love with a smile and a valuable lesson: listen to the woman in your group.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mark Taylor

    The color of the bridesmaids and the groomsmen‘s clothing at Chris and Tina’s wedding is just one of the scintillating anecdotes that you’ll skim over while zipping through this pedestrian account of what I assume to be an interesting life. Poor writing and an astonishing lack of insight make this the least essential rock memoir ever.

  14. 4 out of 5

    chris

    Vacillates between drivel (sorry Chris, really don't care about your wedding or who you thought was "gorgeous," and I REALLY don't care about your f***ing boat) and vindictiveness (Talking Heads broke up almost 30 years ago, but man, he still feels compelled to drag David Byrne through the mud). Readers should be aware that Frantz and Weymouth have been taking public shots at Byrne almost since the band's inception (https://www.salon.com/2003/12/03/head...). Weymouth, at times, has come off as l Vacillates between drivel (sorry Chris, really don't care about your wedding or who you thought was "gorgeous," and I REALLY don't care about your f***ing boat) and vindictiveness (Talking Heads broke up almost 30 years ago, but man, he still feels compelled to drag David Byrne through the mud). Readers should be aware that Frantz and Weymouth have been taking public shots at Byrne almost since the band's inception (https://www.salon.com/2003/12/03/head...). Weymouth, at times, has come off as less than kind and maybe even a little nuts (unless you believe that Byrne conspired with a Brazilian Voodoo doctor to kill a 14-year-old child--no, she wasn't kidding). The fact that she told the world Byrne had Aspergers and meant it as an insult says more about her than it does about Byrne. Then there's the rumor she started about Byrne having a "baby penis" (I'm not making it up! This is all well documented.) Byrne, for his part, has admitted that he was difficult to work with, but you have to give him this: he doesn't go around vilifying and humiliating his ex-bandmates. Frantz skips over the more salacious bits here, but otherwise it's no holds barred, and you really could choke on the hypocrisy. He accuses Byrne of stealing credit for lyrics? He and Weymouth famously stole whole songs from Adrian Belew, then shunned him. David Byrne was a meanie and didn't pay Frantz enough compliments? Well, he didn't publicly stab you in the back again and again and again. Bottom line: Frantz and Weymouth latched onto a genius, rode him to personal fortune, then apparently resented the hell out of him for it. Watch STOP MAKING SENSE again: only one member of that band was irreplaceable. Three decades later, Frantz is still relying on Byrne for sales. Don't oblige him. Read Byrne's HOW MUSIC WORKS instead--Byrne actually has something to say.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Chad Guarino

    Chris Frantz steps out from behind the drum kit to chronicle an amazing life in music and marriage in Remain in Love, the memoir of the former Talking Heads and Tom Tom Club drummer. This book was highly anticipated for me, as the Talking Heads are one of my favorite bands of the post-punk era and they are also one of the more enigmatic ones, with little information surrounding their time together and eventual break up. Despite this, Frantz's memoir ended up being a bit of a mixed bag for me. Wr Chris Frantz steps out from behind the drum kit to chronicle an amazing life in music and marriage in Remain in Love, the memoir of the former Talking Heads and Tom Tom Club drummer. This book was highly anticipated for me, as the Talking Heads are one of my favorite bands of the post-punk era and they are also one of the more enigmatic ones, with little information surrounding their time together and eventual break up. Despite this, Frantz's memoir ended up being a bit of a mixed bag for me. Written with an enthusiastic but clearly amateur zeal, the prose is at turns charming and infuriating as Frantz delves into what must be a near photographic memory, detailing the minutiae of his day to day life recording and touring, down to what everyone had to eat and drink on each particular day back in the 1970s and 80s. While these hyperactive details can get grating at times, the strength of the narrative comes when Frantz is talking about his relationship with his girlfriend and later wife, Talking Heads bassist Tina Weymouth. Frantz is clearly still head over heels for her and their relationship seems very strong, which is amazing given the amount of drugs and partying Frantz describes partaking in throughout the band's career. Talking Heads fans looking for the juicy details on David Byrne's fractured relationship with his bandmates and the band's breakup may be a bit disappointed. Frantz is clearly a "go with the flow" type to the extreme, so even his occasional slights towards Byrne and collaborator/producer Brian Eno seem like afterthoughts. However, this lack of gossip is made up for by the fantastic stories Frantz relates about the CBGB era of the New York art/music scene: seeing Patti Smith play for the first time, opening for the Ramones and Television, drinking scotch with Iggy Pop, David Bowie stealing their peanuts, and eating ice cream and pancakes with Lou Reed at 4am. While this book may not have been the tell-all expose I was expecting, it was a fun read that was made engaging by the clear zest the author has for life. Frantz also mentions offhandedly that Tina Weymouth is also working on a memoir about her life as a woman in music, so I am going to add that to my list of future reads to get another side of the story. **I was given a copy of this book by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. My thanks to St. Martin's Press**

  16. 4 out of 5

    James Hewkin

    I love Talking Heads. Their music is incredible and original and makes me feel great. This memoir by the drummer, Chris Frantz was fascinating but, God bless him, he's a terrible writer. The book was really unbalanced. It goes into painstaking detail about two Talking Heads tours; four Tom Tom Club albums aren't even mentioned and he skims over the last 30 years in less than 50 pages. Some of the stories are really cool, but he’s not great at telling them. You can tell he’s from a middle-class I love Talking Heads. Their music is incredible and original and makes me feel great. This memoir by the drummer, Chris Frantz was fascinating but, God bless him, he's a terrible writer. The book was really unbalanced. It goes into painstaking detail about two Talking Heads tours; four Tom Tom Club albums aren't even mentioned and he skims over the last 30 years in less than 50 pages. Some of the stories are really cool, but he’s not great at telling them. You can tell he’s from a middle-class Middle/Southern America WASP background by his superficial, conservative views. You often get the impression that life is just something that happens to him and he's the nice guy who either marvels at the good bits or merely shrugs off the assholes. There are countless examples of how he and Tina were wronged by others, particularly David Byrne and Johnny Ramone, but the details are so spare that you are left suspecting you are only getting half the story. Tina and he are always the blameless victims. Despite all his slagging-off of David Byrne, it is obvious that they were just very different types of people who didn't really get or even particularly like each other. Jerry Harrison, (one quarter of Talking Heads) is barely mentioned at all. There was a great deal of detail about various meals the author had eaten or outfits people he met were wearing and yet we learn so little about his creative contribution to two extremely creative and critically acclaimed bands. There is very little insight into his approach as a drummer or producer. Chris mentions having an apparently serious drug problem in the last few pages. He manages to get on top of it by the sound of things, but this deserved more than two lines in a book about his life. I feel this was a missed opportunity, but I appreciate the effort. Where were the publishers/editors?

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ron S

    Art school rockers Talking Heads were one of the oddest and brightest lights to shine from the grotty, hallowed ground of CBGB in the mid-70s. As drummer and co-founder Chris Frantz notes in this fun reading memoir (I’ll get back to that), they “were post-punk before there even was punk.” Frantz married bassist Tina Weymouth, and went on to form dance band Tom Tom Club with her and later work as a producer. Even judged by pre internet/social media standards, there was never a great deal of infor Art school rockers Talking Heads were one of the oddest and brightest lights to shine from the grotty, hallowed ground of CBGB in the mid-70s. As drummer and co-founder Chris Frantz notes in this fun reading memoir (I’ll get back to that), they “were post-punk before there even was punk.” Frantz married bassist Tina Weymouth, and went on to form dance band Tom Tom Club with her and later work as a producer. Even judged by pre internet/social media standards, there was never a great deal of information made available about the band in their heyday, and frontman David Byrne’s books since haven’t dealt with them. Frantz reveals a great amount of detail here in a lively memoir that both does and doesn’t trod familiar ground. He does recount a lot of frustration with Byrne for receiving too much credit for the Talking Heads’ success, and he does recount the problems with alcohol and cocaine that almost ended his marriage. But what makes this such a fun read is that Frantz doesn’t write from a place of anger or bitterness in the way of so many musician memoirs. Through it all, he seems to have remained in love, and that makes this a great read.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Pamela Laferriere

    Chris Frantz is an utter dullard. Avoid.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jay

    Back when I was in high school, I had musical tastes that ran counter to my traditional rural Midwestern classmates. While most were headbangers, or the milder version of arena rockers, or into post-outlaw country, I tended to the occasionally cerebral, often fun songs by artists outside of the mainstream as it existed where I was. Which means I enjoyed new wave, art rock, and the like, much of it British. Out of that conglomeration of sounds came “Psycho Killer”. I was a fan of Talking Heads fr Back when I was in high school, I had musical tastes that ran counter to my traditional rural Midwestern classmates. While most were headbangers, or the milder version of arena rockers, or into post-outlaw country, I tended to the occasionally cerebral, often fun songs by artists outside of the mainstream as it existed where I was. Which means I enjoyed new wave, art rock, and the like, much of it British. Out of that conglomeration of sounds came “Psycho Killer”. I was a fan of Talking Heads from the time I first heard them. Got the vinyl, saw a 1982 concert, got some of the post-band albums, and even (much more recently) read David Byrne’s books on music and bicycles. Now, with Chris Frantz’s new book, you get the story from Chris and, maybe, wife and bandmate Tina Weymouth. Chris tells a personal version of events, from his early years to the formation of the band. His early band years stories are quite interesting, mixing the rock and roll business stories of touring, writing, and partying with his own story of falling in love with Tina. It seems they have their rolls here – David Byrne as the self-centered occasionally crazy one, Chris as the drug-taking but earnest one, and Tina as the beauty/Mom/responsible one (she's the Winnie Cooper of New Wave). Frantz provides an extremely detailed retrospective of their lives, with quite funny stories about the first major tour with the Ramones. Some of the later stories showed some reflection, as he talks about the band’s induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and about sailing. As I listened to this audiobook, I found myself wondering a few things. One, how did he keep track of all the venues and all the anecdotes he relates here. At times, he even mentions the food they ate, forty years ago. I didn’t catch an explanation. Also, what was Tina’s role in the writing of this book? Perhaps this was described in the paper book, but in the audiobook with no addenda or intro, she is the often mentioned party who happens to live with the author, and who would have made a great co-author. This makes me wonder if Tina has her own book in the pipeline. When it comes to Tina, this book is a tribute to her from Frantz. He has absolutely nothing bad or critical to say about her. Perhaps she was greatly involved in writing this book but didn’t want her name on it because of this. Nevertheless, this is refreshing as a celebrity describing the love of his life, and I am surprised to say that this is the part, or theme of the book I feel I will remember the best. I also wonder why Frantz reads the unabridged audio of his book. His tempo is very slow and plodding. I don’t think I could have listened to the entire book at normal speed, but at double speed it moved at a good pace. Still, there are a lot of stories here. Fans will find a lot of interest. I found it enjoyable, but you're left with a kind of bad taste for David Byrne. So now, I deserve a little break with some Tom Tom Club. Play that bass, Tina.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ex-Priest Tobin

    This is an account of Chris Frantz' life and music career, predominantly with the new wave band Talking Heads. The style is simplistic and anecdotal. Frantz comes from a privileged background (his father was a Harvard-educated lawyer) and the early accounts of his life are of little interest. The action picks up on his descriptions of the New York music scene and the CBGB in particular: it never ceases to amaze that so many fantastic bands all cut their teeth at the one venue. The Heads' professi This is an account of Chris Frantz' life and music career, predominantly with the new wave band Talking Heads. The style is simplistic and anecdotal. Frantz comes from a privileged background (his father was a Harvard-educated lawyer) and the early accounts of his life are of little interest. The action picks up on his descriptions of the New York music scene and the CBGB in particular: it never ceases to amaze that so many fantastic bands all cut their teeth at the one venue. The Heads' professionalism and dedication to their craft are evident throughout, and Frantz' account goes some way to explaining the tightness of the band on the superb 'The Name of this Band is Talking Heads' live record. The last third of the book focuses more on Frantz and his partner and fellow Head member Tina Weymouth's side projects, Tom-Tom Club in particular, which are of little interest to myself. More upsetting are Frantz' attacks on Heads' frontman David Byrne. Some of these are justified - in cases where Byrne apparently omitted the rest of the band from songwriting credits - but the majority are criticisms of character. A late shot about Byrne's marriage splitting up is particularly nasty. As a matter of decency the divorce is surely none of Frantz' business and this piece of unpleasantness alone gives some indication as to why the frontman may have decided to break away from the rest of the band. I don't know if Frantz is expecting sympathy from the reader with respect to Byrne's behaviour, as by this account Frantz has certainly lived a charmed life. He has had a stable and prosperous upbringing, a happy and lasting marriage, achieved his career dreams and creative objectives and now seems to spend the majority of his time cruising the Bahamas. As to the truth of the division of songwriting between Byrne and the rest of the band, based on Byrne's own books he certainly seems a deeper thinker and more reflective character than Frantz, who, while ambitious, does seem inordinately caught up in namedropping celebrities whom he has had the pleasure to meet throughout his career. There is little reflection here on the Heads' role in the development American popular music, or of their place on the historical spectrum of American pop/rock. I was expecting more from Frantz in this respect. Taking into account Frantz/Weymouth's and Byrne's solo music careers also, personally I suspect that Frantz and Weymouth were the groove of Talking Heads, while Byrne (and to a lesser extent producer Brian Eno) were the brains of the operation that distinguished the band from its inferior New Wave peers.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Haider

    So, I am a fan of Talking Heads, but not a Mega-fan. It is not like I have posters up or have all of their lyrics memorized. However, I have a good number of songs on regular rotation. In fact, I played Psycho Killer so much that when my son was 2 or 3 I occasionally heard his little voice from the backseat of my car saying "play Psycho Killer!" This new memoir by Chris Frantz tells of his youth, his time with the Talking Heads and Tom Tom Club. Frantz tells of how he met his wife Tina Weymouth a So, I am a fan of Talking Heads, but not a Mega-fan. It is not like I have posters up or have all of their lyrics memorized. However, I have a good number of songs on regular rotation. In fact, I played Psycho Killer so much that when my son was 2 or 3 I occasionally heard his little voice from the backseat of my car saying "play Psycho Killer!" This new memoir by Chris Frantz tells of his youth, his time with the Talking Heads and Tom Tom Club. Frantz tells of how he met his wife Tina Weymouth and David Byrne while they were students at the Rhode Island School of Design and formed a band that was called The Artistics. Later, after he graduated, Chris and Tina moved to NYC where they moved into an industrial loft space with David Byrne so they could work on their music. They became regulars at the nearby club CBGB, where many bands got their start in the 1970's. Like any celebrity or rock & roll memoir, there is lots of name dropping of people they met along the way...The Ramones, Debbie Harry, Grace Jones etc. to name a few. We also see that there have been tensions between David Byrne and the rest of the band since early on. David has issues connecting and socializing with the band and is apparently oblivious to giving others credit. I found this to be an interesting and entertaining read. While, Chris Frantz may not be a wordsmith, his voice does come through and we clearly feel the love he has for his wife and his passion for music. The audio version is narrated by Chris himself. What to listen to while reading (or taking a break) Clearly, the obvious choice here is The Talking Heads and Tom Tom Club. Other groups mentioned that you can listen to include The Ramones, XTC, Blondie, Bob Marley... I received an audio review copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    Chris Frantz has written an evocative, resonant and provocative coming-of-age memoir about his life as drummer/songwriter and founding member of both Talking Heads and Tom Tom Club. Fans of Patti Smith's JUST FRIENDS will find much to admire in Frantz's REMAIN IN LOVE, especially the sensory way he describes life as a struggling musician in the early 1970s on New York City's Lower East Side. He remembers stepping over corpses on the sidewalks; avoiding five-dollar hookers and their pimp armed wi Chris Frantz has written an evocative, resonant and provocative coming-of-age memoir about his life as drummer/songwriter and founding member of both Talking Heads and Tom Tom Club. Fans of Patti Smith's JUST FRIENDS will find much to admire in Frantz's REMAIN IN LOVE, especially the sensory way he describes life as a struggling musician in the early 1970s on New York City's Lower East Side. He remembers stepping over corpses on the sidewalks; avoiding five-dollar hookers and their pimp armed with a baseball bat; and never making eye contact with anyone on the streets. But Frantz also recalls neighbors including Debbie Harry, Lauren Hutton, William S. Burroughs and Robert Mapplethorpe. Frantz shared an apartment (with toilets in the hall) with future wife Tina Weymouth, as well as David Byrne. In 1975, their musical group Talking Heads made its debut opening for the Ramones at CBGB bar. Jerry Harrison joined the group in 1977. Frantz offers fascinating stories of world travels, working with idols and how the group's style repeatedly changed. There are also tales of conflict within the band, which Frantz tells with remarkable clarity, fairness and insight. In 1991, "David sneaked out of Talking Heads," with Byrne announcing the end of the band without consulting the other members. A decade later, there was finally a happy ending when the band reunited to play at their induction into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. Fans of the new wave music scene will appreciate Frantz's generously detailed and compelling memoir of those volatile and exciting times in REMAIN IN LOVE.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    I'm finished in the sense that I'm not finishing. I really don't care what color sofa he and Tina bought in 1976 for their mouse infested dump of a loft. I'm sure all of us have former co-workers we don't especially look back on with an abundance of fondness but when that co-worker is the one who actually made you famous, you could be a bit more generous! If Chris Frantz and Tina Weymouth passed me on the street I wouldn't know who either of them were. David Byrne, however, is another matter. Th I'm finished in the sense that I'm not finishing. I really don't care what color sofa he and Tina bought in 1976 for their mouse infested dump of a loft. I'm sure all of us have former co-workers we don't especially look back on with an abundance of fondness but when that co-worker is the one who actually made you famous, you could be a bit more generous! If Chris Frantz and Tina Weymouth passed me on the street I wouldn't know who either of them were. David Byrne, however, is another matter. This was the dreariest book with minutiae about such random crap as the names of people who lived in dorm rooms down the hall. Or the guy who was the super of a building they lived in. Who cares?! I wanted to know about the band. So I gave up halfway hence the halfway mark in stars which is only fair to the author.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jay Gabler

    "You're never going to make it in this business," David Johansen of the New York Dolls told Chris Frantz one night at CBGB. "You're too nice!" Johansen was right about the latter, not so much about the former. Frantz is one of the poster-boy nice guys of the post-punk era, the joyfully sweaty drummer working triumphantly at his kit in the iconic concert film Stop Making Sense. As he repeatedly acknowledges in his new memoir, Frantz had every reason to be. He was in one of the world's most excitin "You're never going to make it in this business," David Johansen of the New York Dolls told Chris Frantz one night at CBGB. "You're too nice!" Johansen was right about the latter, not so much about the former. Frantz is one of the poster-boy nice guys of the post-punk era, the joyfully sweaty drummer working triumphantly at his kit in the iconic concert film Stop Making Sense. As he repeatedly acknowledges in his new memoir, Frantz had every reason to be. He was in one of the world's most exciting bands, he was married to the group's talented and sexy bassist, and — when filming the last of three nights that became Stop Making Sense — Frantz had just made his Soul Train debut with his hitmaking side project Tom Tom Club. Yep, Chris Frantz has had a good life. This despite longstanding frustration with his band's anti-charismatic frontman. "You could say that Tina and I were the team who made David Byrne famous," Frantz writes in the book's preface. Well, then! Tell us what you really think. I reviewed Remain In Love for The Current.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Alan

    He's not a great writetr, but has an incredible memory and this thrilling ride through the late 70s early 80s punk/etc is rendered with detail down to what Brian Eno ate and what Debbie Harry wore. He also reads the audiobook. Highest possible recommendation for music nerds!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Scott Wilson

    A handful of amusing anecdotes, staggeringly little musical or creative insight. This must not be the place to find out how Talking Heads did what it did.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Tom Scott

    When I was a teenager I read a lot of rock/punk/music press and literature and I fully bought into the myth-making, the romance, the “man I wish I was there”-ness of it all. It was fun, edifying, giving me fables to cling to, roadmaps to adulthood. Well, of course, I now know it was all bullshit. Underneath it’s just a bunch of people doing people things. So. Here we have a gentle, mostly inoffensive, undaring retelling of an upper-middle-class normal-guy rock ’n roll drummer’s career in a band When I was a teenager I read a lot of rock/punk/music press and literature and I fully bought into the myth-making, the romance, the “man I wish I was there”-ness of it all. It was fun, edifying, giving me fables to cling to, roadmaps to adulthood. Well, of course, I now know it was all bullshit. Underneath it’s just a bunch of people doing people things. So. Here we have a gentle, mostly inoffensive, undaring retelling of an upper-middle-class normal-guy rock ’n roll drummer’s career in a band that at one time meant more to me than I’m embarrassed to admit. The events are mundane, boring even. Just a laundry list of shows played and people met. Drugs taken. Cute girls noticed. There’s no more meaning than that. The unsavory thing about this book though, beyond the shattering of mythologies (which I’m old enough to deal with), is Frantz really has a bone to pick with David Byrne and an oddly strong and constant need to defend his wife’s sexiness, musical chops, and, well, the wonderfulness of the life they’ve lead (vis-a-vis Byrne, of course). The passive-aggressiveness is constant. And it feels icky. I don’t doubt their opinion but I don’t care. So, I hadn't listened to a Talking Heads' album from start to finish in years (maybe decades). But to clear my mind of this book I put on Remain in Light. There! It’s there! The romance rises and crackles. The fable’s heartbeat still (if faintly) beats. Just leave me with this. Don’t take it away.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Larry

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Want to read a book about The Talking Heads with 95% Byrneless content? Want to read a rock memoir that mentions cocaine rehab in last chapter but only has 2 good coke stories? Did you know Chris really loves Tina? That said, it was still entertaining.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer DeBernardis

    #netgalley #stmartinspress #remaininlove Opening this book, I was a fan of TH music, but knew nothing about the band, outside of the name of their quirky lead singer. And so it was with interest and fascination that I read the story of drummer Chris Frantz, with a heaping side helping story of bassist Tina Weymouth, who would eventually become Frantz’s wife. The three principals of Talking Heads (joined later by Jerry Harrison), all seem to come from privileged backgrounds which converge at Rhode #netgalley #stmartinspress #remaininlove Opening this book, I was a fan of TH music, but knew nothing about the band, outside of the name of their quirky lead singer. And so it was with interest and fascination that I read the story of drummer Chris Frantz, with a heaping side helping story of bassist Tina Weymouth, who would eventually become Frantz’s wife. The three principals of Talking Heads (joined later by Jerry Harrison), all seem to come from privileged backgrounds which converge at Rhode Island School of Design. Frantz walks us through the founding of the band while at RISD and then brings the NYC of the Late 70’s/80’s into Sensorial technicolor, with guest appearances by a long list of names from Warhol, Patti Smith, the Ramones and many more. A tour through Europe opening for the Ramones is full of minute detail, down to the meals and vintage of the wine consumed. Frantz must have kept a diary. While Frantz is enigmatic and somewhat befuddled in his account of why Byrne broke away from his band mates, and seems to harbor little resentment, his love for Weymouth (working on a book of her own, we’re told) leaps from almost every page. That, in itself, in the world of rock and roll, is remarkable. Thanks to NetGalley for the review copy.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Cindy

    Chris Frantz, drummer for Talking Heads and Tom Tom Club, opens up about life with Tina Weymouth, his spouse and musical partner. This zippy memoir explains how Frantz, studying art at the Rhode Island School of Design in the early 1970s, meets fellow students Weymouth and David Byrne. This trio forms the seminal band Talking Heads, with Byrne as front man and Weymouth on bass. The next decade is a whirlwind: as Talking Heads (with the addition of Jerry Harrison) become an international sensatio Chris Frantz, drummer for Talking Heads and Tom Tom Club, opens up about life with Tina Weymouth, his spouse and musical partner. This zippy memoir explains how Frantz, studying art at the Rhode Island School of Design in the early 1970s, meets fellow students Weymouth and David Byrne. This trio forms the seminal band Talking Heads, with Byrne as front man and Weymouth on bass. The next decade is a whirlwind: as Talking Heads (with the addition of Jerry Harrison) become an international sensation Frantz and Weymouth marry, starting a lifetime of collaboration with punk and pop musical legends. Frantz has a terrific memory for people and places, and while this is generally an affectionate story he doesn't shy from giving his point of view on, among other things, his relationship with the enigmatic Byrne. Queue up the extensive musical catalogue from these two bands to accompany this delightful read!

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