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The Hilarious World of Depression

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For years John Moe, critically-acclaimed public radio personality and host of The Hilarious World of Depression podcast, struggled with depression; it plagued his family and claimed the life of his brother in 2007. As Moe came to terms with his own illness, he began to see similar patterns of behavior and coping mechanisms surfacing in conversations with others, including For years John Moe, critically-acclaimed public radio personality and host of The Hilarious World of Depression podcast, struggled with depression; it plagued his family and claimed the life of his brother in 2007. As Moe came to terms with his own illness, he began to see similar patterns of behavior and coping mechanisms surfacing in conversations with others, including high-profile comedians who'd struggled with the disease. Moe saw that there was tremendous comfort and community in open dialogue about these shared experiences and that humor had a unique power. Thus was born the podcast The Hilarious World of Depression. Inspired by the immediate success of the podcast, Moe has written a remarkable investigation of the disease, part memoir of his own journey, part treasure trove of laugh-out-loud stories and insights drawn from years of interviews with some of the most brilliant minds facing similar challenges. Throughout the course of this powerful narrative, depression's universal themes come to light, among them, struggles with identity, lack of understanding of the symptoms, the challenges of work-life, self-medicating, the fallout of the disease in the lives of our loved ones, the tragedy of suicide, and the hereditary aspects of the disease. The Hilarious World of Depression illuminates depression in an entirely fresh and inspiring way.


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For years John Moe, critically-acclaimed public radio personality and host of The Hilarious World of Depression podcast, struggled with depression; it plagued his family and claimed the life of his brother in 2007. As Moe came to terms with his own illness, he began to see similar patterns of behavior and coping mechanisms surfacing in conversations with others, including For years John Moe, critically-acclaimed public radio personality and host of The Hilarious World of Depression podcast, struggled with depression; it plagued his family and claimed the life of his brother in 2007. As Moe came to terms with his own illness, he began to see similar patterns of behavior and coping mechanisms surfacing in conversations with others, including high-profile comedians who'd struggled with the disease. Moe saw that there was tremendous comfort and community in open dialogue about these shared experiences and that humor had a unique power. Thus was born the podcast The Hilarious World of Depression. Inspired by the immediate success of the podcast, Moe has written a remarkable investigation of the disease, part memoir of his own journey, part treasure trove of laugh-out-loud stories and insights drawn from years of interviews with some of the most brilliant minds facing similar challenges. Throughout the course of this powerful narrative, depression's universal themes come to light, among them, struggles with identity, lack of understanding of the symptoms, the challenges of work-life, self-medicating, the fallout of the disease in the lives of our loved ones, the tragedy of suicide, and the hereditary aspects of the disease. The Hilarious World of Depression illuminates depression in an entirely fresh and inspiring way.

30 review for The Hilarious World of Depression

  1. 4 out of 5

    Danielle Prielipp

    This is a book everyone should read, regardless of whether they’ve listened to THWoD podcast. It has the potential to help normies have some empathy for the saddies and to remind the saddies (like me) that they are not alone in this.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    I’m going to be honest this book was nothing like I had assumed it was going to be, but I loved it more than I could have imagined. I’ve never listened to the podcast because, well, I’m like the one weirdo in the world who just doesn’t enjoy podcasts. So I assumed this was going to be a book with a lot of levity. It definitely had its moments of humor and I appreciated all of them, but at its core this is a great book about what it’s really like to struggle with your mental health. Part memoir an I’m going to be honest this book was nothing like I had assumed it was going to be, but I loved it more than I could have imagined. I’ve never listened to the podcast because, well, I’m like the one weirdo in the world who just doesn’t enjoy podcasts. So I assumed this was going to be a book with a lot of levity. It definitely had its moments of humor and I appreciated all of them, but at its core this is a great book about what it’s really like to struggle with your mental health. Part memoir and part anecdotes from those Moe has interviewed, this is the story we all really need right now. There were so many times in this book that I would read a passage and have to reread it again because, as someone who struggles with my mental health, I felt so seen. I highly recommend this one whether you struggle with your mental health or not. There is so much insight here and I feel we can all benefit from Moe’s honest, raw and occasionally humorous experiences. I received an advanced copy in exchange for my honest review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tina

    The Hilarious World of Depression by John Moe is a book that hit close to home for me. Fellow saddies where you at? I could relate to a lot of the things John discusses in this book and I really appreciated how honest he was about his feelings growing up with depression, navigating his career and dealing with his brother’s suicide. Throughout the book are these snippets of hilarious sarcastic wit that shine to make this book not a complete downer to read. Honestly I read this one quite slowly no The Hilarious World of Depression by John Moe is a book that hit close to home for me. Fellow saddies where you at? I could relate to a lot of the things John discusses in this book and I really appreciated how honest he was about his feelings growing up with depression, navigating his career and dealing with his brother’s suicide. Throughout the book are these snippets of hilarious sarcastic wit that shine to make this book not a complete downer to read. Honestly I read this one quite slowly not because I didn’t like it which is normally the case when I read books slowly but because the issues are so intense and especially during this difficult time in the world I don’t think my saddie self could handle it all at once. I recommend this book to all the saddies out there who need some reassurance that you are not alone in your feelings and to all the normies to get a glimpse of what we saddies have to deal with every single day.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    I’d never heard of the author or his podcast; I picked this up because I liked the title and I wasn’t disappointed by the contents. Moe describes what it’s like to grow up with anxiety and depression as something that you don’t talk about, or if you do talk about it, the fact treatment can vary wildly depending on who your therapist is. I related closely to his excerpt about working for Amazon and how the culture is one which can wreak havoc on depressed individuals, particularly ones who are har I’d never heard of the author or his podcast; I picked this up because I liked the title and I wasn’t disappointed by the contents. Moe describes what it’s like to grow up with anxiety and depression as something that you don’t talk about, or if you do talk about it, the fact treatment can vary wildly depending on who your therapist is. I related closely to his excerpt about working for Amazon and how the culture is one which can wreak havoc on depressed individuals, particularly ones who are hard on themselves and have the notion “if I just get the promotion” or “if I just get the recognition” THEN I will be happy. This is something I’ve struggled with significantly in the last several years, and recognizing that it’s happening is a wake up call. I also loved how he talked about working on ecards and how bonkers and ultimately pointless it all was. The saddest part of this book is undoubtedly the details around his brother’s suicide. I can’t imagine the self-blame he endured, and the difficulty of trying to move on with his own life after such tragedy. I would recommend this to anyone who has depression or anxiety, somewhat obviously, but also if you have someone close to you who suffers from those conditions because this may help you understand some of the absurdity that can go on inside our brains. See more of my reviews: Blog // Instagram

  5. 4 out of 5

    June

    John Moe is hilarious. Check out his "Pop Song Correspondences" on McSweeney's or his Twitter account. This book, though, isn't so much hilarious as wry and moving. It's a memoir of his lifelong battle with depression and trauma. For those not up for dealing with talk of suicide, there is plenty of that as he discusses his own suicidal ideation and his brother's death. I don't think I've ever highlighted so much in my Kindle. The observations about what life with depression is like are profound. John Moe is hilarious. Check out his "Pop Song Correspondences" on McSweeney's or his Twitter account. This book, though, isn't so much hilarious as wry and moving. It's a memoir of his lifelong battle with depression and trauma. For those not up for dealing with talk of suicide, there is plenty of that as he discusses his own suicidal ideation and his brother's death. I don't think I've ever highlighted so much in my Kindle. The observations about what life with depression is like are profound. He identifies so many ways in which, in retrospect, depression was limiting his life or changing his reality. If you know or suspect you might have depression, or love someone who does, this book is a great resource for finding the words to discuss the often-taboo subjects related to mental illness. Thanks to the publishers and NetGalley for a digital ARC for the purpose of an unbiased review.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Toni

    4.5 Honest, Logical, Hilarious Stars John tells you the real deal about depression. Straight, honest talk from his experience, his brother’s worst experience, and the many people he talks to on his Podcast. Medical advice will still be required; (i.e. you’ll need to see a therapist.) but this is a great place to start. I highly recommend it. Listened to the Audio.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Cassidee Lanstra

    “Depression is formless, colorless, and odorless, and doesn’t show up on medical imaging.” See all of those bookmarks? The Hilarious World of Depression by John Moe was a delight to read. He makes a point early on to say that he hopes that this book helps people, that they highlight or bookmark and I certainly did that. 4.5/5 stars for me. Thank you to St. Martin’s Press for sending me a copy to review. For those of you who are into podcasts, the author is actually a host of a podcast under the s “Depression is formless, colorless, and odorless, and doesn’t show up on medical imaging.” See all of those bookmarks? The Hilarious World of Depression by John Moe was a delight to read. He makes a point early on to say that he hopes that this book helps people, that they highlight or bookmark and I certainly did that. 4.5/5 stars for me. Thank you to St. Martin’s Press for sending me a copy to review. For those of you who are into podcasts, the author is actually a host of a podcast under the same name, which discusses depression with a bit of a comedic take. First let me say, as someone who most certainly deals with depression, but has been too embarrassed to ever get screened for it… this book was extremely relatable. I felt as if John Moe plucked thoughts from my head. The more I read this book, the more I am convinced that there will come a point where I have to deal with it. He talks about how people with depression often think that if you are able to stop from getting worse, that you’ll be fine. No need for treatment, therapy, but also no improvement mentally. You become a standstill of numbness. He says often, we think the next big achievement in our life will make our depressive thoughts go away and then it follows us, and we think, “if I could only get to THIS POINT, I would be so much happier.” Then you get to that point and you’re not happier. That isn’t your fault, you’re not just pessimistic or an overachiever. You’re probably depressed or at least suffering mentally. With such clarity and honesty, Moe talks about his journey of dealing with the idea of death. It started out as not wanting to be alive, but not actually wanting to kill himself. As his mental state worsens, he talks about contemplating killings himself and how he would do it. It might have been half serious, he might not have ever gone through with it, but that act itself is a cry for help in your own mind. If you think of how you would kill yourself in the most efficient way, that’s not a normal thing people think about when mentally stable. He even talks about his anger and guilt when his brother actually does kill himself in a manner that Moe felt like his previous writings may have influenced. People that commit suicide are people that have fallen to their illness. If someone dies from cancer, we say that their cancer killed them. When people kill themselves, others are angry or confused, like how could they have done that? How selfish? We don’t say, “their depression killed them” or “they fell prey to their illness” when it IS an illness. Moe drives this point home. “Trauma is a wolf and your mind is a house and it’s like, “Oh, I’m safe from that wild because I trapped it in my house before it could hurt me.” But then a while later, it’s “Oh no! What happened to my house? My furniture is shredded and there’s wolf poop everywhere! How did that happen? Oh hey, I’m being mauled.” What I love about this book is that it is so quotable. Moe talks in metaphors and through his experiences, because when it comes to depression, that’s what we’ve got. He teaches us through his traumas, through his reaction to them. He doesn’t paint himself better than he was or is, he talks about mistakes, moments of rage, moments of hilarity. He relates his comedic streak and self-deprecation to his depression, which is something not talked about enough. A lot of people hide mental insecurities and instability through humor. This is obviously a mask, a way to keep people from seeing the turmoil that lies underneath, but it made me really ponder… if we screened every comedian for depression, I wonder how high the statistics would favor positive for depression? Moe prods at this topic throughout his book and brought that question forth in my mind. There was a part in this book that really stood out to me. I think we all know teachers have enough on their plates, we unfairly expect them to teach our kids EVERYTHING. So, I’m not pinning this on them and I don’t think THEY failed us, especially since they are following the curriculum that higher ups provide for them. Anyway, Moe talks about during his health classes, how depression or mental health was never brought up. I can relate to that, our health class was no more than a week block in a classroom near our PE class, and lightly covered STDs and the food pyramid. Now, it is definitely a parent’s job to teach all of this stuff. Sex Ed, proper nutrition, healthy ways to deal with mental health issues but if we are going to include health into the curriculum, it should include mental AND physical, as they’re equally important to our wellbeing. As a society, we do not prioritize mental health. We all fail each other when we view depression as taboo to speak about. My earlier mention of being embarrassed to be screened for depression is proof of that. Why am I embarrassed? Probably because I’ve been conditioned to think that way. It isn’t acceptable to succumb to your mental health even during tragedies, it seems. In college, there’s professors that don’t even view family death as an excuse to be late on an assignment. We are just taught throughout our lives that we need to be strong at all times, we live through war and watching death on the television. We saw people DIE on a live broadcast during 9/11 and we are all just supposed to be okay. We are supposed to happy all the time even though for generations now, we have lived with the threat of nuclear warfare hanging over our heads, which is something I never thought about until John Moe mentioned. I look around and I can say that there’s a pretty equal amount of mentally distressed and mentally healthy people in my life. Thankfully due to books and podcasts like this, our conversation is starting to turn to more acceptance and honesty in relation to mental instability even though we have a long way to go. I get that this review has turned more into a think piece, but that’s what a good book should make you do. Honestly, I probably covered about 4 out of 20 highlights in a book that’s under 300 pages. I can’t quote every relatable thing he said. Well, I could but then I’d just be relaying the entire book to you when you should just read it for yourself. So here’s a long story short: John Moe takes a topic that is… well, depressing (because yes, talking about depression IS often as depressing and draining as it is therapeutic) and he makes it not seem like a chore. He brings laughter and moments of camaraderie to his writing. He makes you feel seen because of his own experiences and vocalization of those experiences and the thoughts that stem from them. Pick up this book if you suffer from depression or if you have a loved one that does, it is amazingly easy to read. It comes out May 5th!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Em

    Jokes so funny I didn't realize they were funny until I was onto the following chapter. Sober anecdotes on a comedian's experience with depression. Straight white male privilege in check.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dara

    An interesting memoir and a unique dialogue about depression. Non-clinical and very accessible. It gets to the real life features of depression and it’s presentation rather than just sticking to a common, but decidedly incomplete, definition that we usually get.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    DNF for me @ 42%.. I really thought this was going to be a different read. I just couldn't get into it. If I say I couldn't relate because I haven't been clinically depressed then I sound like I can't empathize, but I have known many people close to me who have struggled with this. I just didn't find anything funny. However based on other reviews I have read, people are really enjoying this so I wouldn't count it out. I also had never heard of the Podcast, The Hilarious World of Depression so ma DNF for me @ 42%.. I really thought this was going to be a different read. I just couldn't get into it. If I say I couldn't relate because I haven't been clinically depressed then I sound like I can't empathize, but I have known many people close to me who have struggled with this. I just didn't find anything funny. However based on other reviews I have read, people are really enjoying this so I wouldn't count it out. I also had never heard of the Podcast, The Hilarious World of Depression so maybe that was part of it, I had never heard of the author and didn't connect with him. Special Thanks to NetGalley and St. Martin's Press for allowing me an ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Miss R

    Thanks to St Martin's Press and NetGalley for an ARC in exchange for an honest review. If you have not suffered from depression, or do not know someone who has, you may not understand how the words 'hilarious' and 'depression' could be used in the same sentence. However, after reading this book, you may realise that 'The Hilarious World of Depression', is, undoubtedly, a highly appropriate title for Moe's incisive exploration of mental illness. Of course, there is nothing funny about mental illne Thanks to St Martin's Press and NetGalley for an ARC in exchange for an honest review. If you have not suffered from depression, or do not know someone who has, you may not understand how the words 'hilarious' and 'depression' could be used in the same sentence. However, after reading this book, you may realise that 'The Hilarious World of Depression', is, undoubtedly, a highly appropriate title for Moe's incisive exploration of mental illness. Of course, there is nothing funny about mental illness per se, Yet, on the other hand, there is something otherworldly, slightly farcical and yes - something humorous about depression. It can be inspirational fodder for the most glorious comical skit, a coping mechanism, or a way of rationalising, in hindsight, the irrational. actions of the depressive. If you have experienced depression then Moe's colourful, laugh-out-loud stories will resonate. I know they did with me. More importantly, Moe reminded me that I am not alone. It is one thing to know this on a rational level and quite another to feel it. Depression is inherently lonely, but Moe somehow manages to bind the experiences of the individual to a whole community of... well, sufferers is not the right word... survivors? Undoubtedly. The people you will encounter in this book are exceptional - often high-achievers, which makes depression a two-sides-of-the-coin type of illness. It can be highly debilitating, yet equally, a source of inspiration and striving. Depression is often intrinsic to one's personality, and this is sometimes no bad thing. Not everyone survives the all-pervading tentacles of depression, however, yet not everyone survives cancer, or heart disease, but that does not mean we should not strive for something better. Better understanding, better treatment, and most importantly, an inclusive conversation that shatters once and for all the silent, taboo subject of depression. We are getting there. Moe's candid, multi-layered approach to the subject that also considers lack of understanding of the symptoms, the challenges of work-life, self-medicating, the fallout of the disease in the lives of our loved ones, the tragedy of suicide, and the hereditary aspects of the disease, is an important thread in our much needed conversation about depression. Indeed, if you only read one book about depression then make sure it is John Moe's 'The Hilarious World of Depression'. My book of the year so far.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Diane Yannick

    I had never heard of John Moe and my sister, who usually recommends books I hate, told me about it. Somehow, I put it on my radar and obviously (5⭐️!) I’m glad I did. It is an engaging memoir and a master class on depression. The author weaves in his experiences and those of countless people he interviewed. He doesn’t try to pigeonhole symptoms into neat categories with advice. Rather, he gives respect to the ever-changing myriad of shapes that depression can present. He enables others to speak I had never heard of John Moe and my sister, who usually recommends books I hate, told me about it. Somehow, I put it on my radar and obviously (5⭐️!) I’m glad I did. It is an engaging memoir and a master class on depression. The author weaves in his experiences and those of countless people he interviewed. He doesn’t try to pigeonhole symptoms into neat categories with advice. Rather, he gives respect to the ever-changing myriad of shapes that depression can present. He enables others to speak without a pre-determined interviewer agenda. He doesn’t try to sidestep the parts that make him look ‘bad’. He looks at the way the illness affects those who love you. Many of the analogies he made and cited were perfect. For example, a small ball bouncing in a small box and a button symbolizing depression—even as the box gets bigger, the ball is still going to hit that button on occasion. Depression is humbling and not something you cure. It is something that you learn to manage and if you’re lucky like this author, laugh at on occasion. This book is a valuable contribution to the field of psychology and I hope it will be widely read and discussed. Here’s one of my highlights that I want to share and remember: “The thing is, I knew better than to think depression was a result of something. It’s not a reaction, it’s a medical condition. But knowing it and feeling it are different things. I didn’t want to die, but I wanted to take my brain out of my head for a while. Just store it in a jar for a few weeks and then put it back after I rested.” Depression is exhausting.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kim Fox

    You are never too old to learn and this book not only taught me more about depression and mental illness, it also taught me how to be more empathetic. The Hilarious World of Depression by John Moe, is just what its title says. Funny at times, and just heartbreakingly sad in others. When the author tells the story of his older brothers suicide, the tears fell hard and fast. 😭 But I think what touched me the most or what gave me the biggest wake up call is when the author talks about having to writ You are never too old to learn and this book not only taught me more about depression and mental illness, it also taught me how to be more empathetic. The Hilarious World of Depression by John Moe, is just what its title says. Funny at times, and just heartbreakingly sad in others. When the author tells the story of his older brothers suicide, the tears fell hard and fast. 😭 But I think what touched me the most or what gave me the biggest wake up call is when the author talks about having to write the obituary for his brother.... "Sometimes an obituary might throw in coded language like "he died unexpectedly at home" or "she passed away unexpectedly" to let readers know that yes of course it was suicide - one of the top causes of death in America- but we are too embarrassed to say. " "To me, that omission always has some bad side effects. One is to give camouflage to the disease itself, because if no one ever talks about it, then everyone is much less likely to detect it. To discuss addiction or depression or other mental illnesses is to provide information about them, including their pathologies and symptoms. " It's like anything else in that if you stick your head in the sand and ignore it, it doesn't mean it doesn't exist. All it means is that your ass is in the air. And that goes for "saddies and normies". There is alot of work for us normies. We all need to recognize that not only does depression exist, but it is much more prevalent than we know AND we need to learn to communicate in a way that doesn't negate the way that saddies feel. Like I said, this book has a lot to offer everyone. 5⭐ Thank you so much to Netgalley and St. Martins Press for the eARC of this book in exchange for my honest review. And a huge thank you to John Moe for being brave enough to write this book and share it with the world!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    As someone who struggles with depression, I always find it helpful to read other people's accounts of how they're living with the condition. And if the story can be told with a little humor, that's even better. John Moe, creator of the podcast with the same name, offers a book that's a little different from what I was expecting. It's written almost in the form of a memoir where he writes about his own experience growing up with depression, his suicidal thoughts and urges that developed in adulth As someone who struggles with depression, I always find it helpful to read other people's accounts of how they're living with the condition. And if the story can be told with a little humor, that's even better. John Moe, creator of the podcast with the same name, offers a book that's a little different from what I was expecting. It's written almost in the form of a memoir where he writes about his own experience growing up with depression, his suicidal thoughts and urges that developed in adulthood, and how other members of his family struggled with mental illness. Moe is able to express perfectly the despair that's present for people he deems 'saddies.' I related to so much of his descriptions of how depression can affect day-to-day life and how it can hinder your plans for the future. Because Moe's podcast focuses on interviewing celebrities about their own depression, I was expecting more of these other stories from a variety of people (including a lot of comedians who face their diagnosis with a sense of humor). Although Moe includes some, the majority of the book is related to his personal life. The sections devoted to his career were a little less interesting to me, but overall, I think Moe does a commendable job getting down to the gritty details of how his depression informs his thought processes and behaviors. I definitely recommend this book to anyone who has depression and needs help reframing (especially with humor and humility) and for anyone with loved ones who have depression - this book will likely create a lot of empathy instead of judgment. *Free ARC provided by St. Martin's Press in exchange for an honest review*

  15. 4 out of 5

    Harry Jahnke

    First of all, I want to say how dare John Moe stalk me since early childhood and write a book about me. I'm kidding but this book is incredibly relatable. Almost scarily so (I also went to a middle school called Sacajawea. Coincidence?). As someone who has lived with chronic depression and suicidal thoughts for years on end, it was absolutely gut-wrenching and wonderful to listen to this. I hated being able to relate to all of this mental illness and at the same time, it's so comforting to know First of all, I want to say how dare John Moe stalk me since early childhood and write a book about me. I'm kidding but this book is incredibly relatable. Almost scarily so (I also went to a middle school called Sacajawea. Coincidence?). As someone who has lived with chronic depression and suicidal thoughts for years on end, it was absolutely gut-wrenching and wonderful to listen to this. I hated being able to relate to all of this mental illness and at the same time, it's so comforting to know that I'm not alone and that help exists and that there is a light at the end of the tunnel. I may never be rid of my depression but at least with this book, I know that there are things out there that work, people willing to help, and that depression is a lying asshole who wants to kill me that I don't have to take any shit from. Bless this book and bless John Moe for sharing it with the world.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Matt Bender

    This book is about 70 percent memoir and 30 percent anecdotes from his podcast. It made me want to listen to the podcast. I found some of the humor to be cheesy, and some of the analogies and stories (especially the Amazon one) to be very funny. What I appreciate about the book is the author’s candid description of mental illness including his observations on how it has affected his family and others. He also gives great verbiage to frame mental health issues. Would recommend for anyone whether This book is about 70 percent memoir and 30 percent anecdotes from his podcast. It made me want to listen to the podcast. I found some of the humor to be cheesy, and some of the analogies and stories (especially the Amazon one) to be very funny. What I appreciate about the book is the author’s candid description of mental illness including his observations on how it has affected his family and others. He also gives great verbiage to frame mental health issues. Would recommend for anyone whether they have depression issues or not. We all know someone with it and most have periods of depression and this book gives excellent insight into the issues of mental health.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Steven

    Amazingly raw, personal, yet funny memoir by John Moe about his (& his family’s) struggles with mental illnesses. This book highlights Moe’s journey to his great podcast from which the book gained its title. If you or anyone you care for has depression, this would be a great book with which to allow someone a chance to better understand how depression or mental illness aren’t just something you will yourself through. This will be a book I’ll buy to share with people as a way to lead to better un Amazingly raw, personal, yet funny memoir by John Moe about his (& his family’s) struggles with mental illnesses. This book highlights Moe’s journey to his great podcast from which the book gained its title. If you or anyone you care for has depression, this would be a great book with which to allow someone a chance to better understand how depression or mental illness aren’t just something you will yourself through. This will be a book I’ll buy to share with people as a way to lead to better understanding of mental illnesses.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tiina

    I'll be honest, I started this with no knowledge about THWoD podcast. I had no idea who the author was, but a funny book about depression? I was in. I've not been diagnosed myself (I did have anxiety), but some of the aspects in this book seemed very familiar indeed. In fact, I had a full on crying jag at one point where he was describing some of his life. It felt familiar, but also hopeful, and such an aha-moment. This is a serious book in its subject matter, but Moe has a funny and very matter-o I'll be honest, I started this with no knowledge about THWoD podcast. I had no idea who the author was, but a funny book about depression? I was in. I've not been diagnosed myself (I did have anxiety), but some of the aspects in this book seemed very familiar indeed. In fact, I had a full on crying jag at one point where he was describing some of his life. It felt familiar, but also hopeful, and such an aha-moment. This is a serious book in its subject matter, but Moe has a funny and very matter-of-fact way of writing that it came off as hopeful and helpful instead. Yes, it's mental illness, yes, there's no immediate cure, but if you get help, then you will find your way. Not to "healing completely", but accepting yourself as a "saddie" and realising the moments when your depression is trying to addle your reality. I'm not articulate enough to review this book, but in short: I think it's great. It's not trying to be a self-help book either. It's just a story of this guy's life and how his hit podcast came to be. That is via a e-card business and working for Amazon (!?) and radio. He also touches on imposter syndrome and I'm sure most people will be able to empathise with that chapter. The book is funny, sad, and hopeful at the same time. I recommend it on audio and for everyone, whether you are a person with depression or know people who have a mental illness. *One note I will try not to forget so I'm writing it down. Always say mental illness - it's not a disease (as that has a cause, such as a virus or bacteria). AND it's better to say "John is a person with schizophrenia", not "John is a schizophreniac". Always up for language tips!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tara

    The Hilarious World of Depression by John Moe Is depression funny? This is the first question Moe askes of his podcast guests, and while many “normies” wouldn’t think so, many “saddies” answer yes. Depression is deceitful, pervasive, and damaging, with symptoms that are ridiculous to those who live with it and mystifying to those who don’t. The Hilarious World of Depression (THWoD) podcast created a fandom around depression, with guest stars such as John Green, Jenny Lawson, Aimee Man, Jeff Twee The Hilarious World of Depression by John Moe Is depression funny? This is the first question Moe askes of his podcast guests, and while many “normies” wouldn’t think so, many “saddies” answer yes. Depression is deceitful, pervasive, and damaging, with symptoms that are ridiculous to those who live with it and mystifying to those who don’t. The Hilarious World of Depression (THWoD) podcast created a fandom around depression, with guest stars such as John Green, Jenny Lawson, Aimee Man, Jeff Tweedy, Wil Wheaton, and more, Moe gets famous people to talk about their experiences with depression, which is completely relatable to those of us who live with the disease. In the book, Moe focuses on his own mental health journey, relating how he was affected by childhood trauma, his brother’s suicide, and living with Clinny D (clinical depression). Moving, heartbreaking, and funny, this is a must-read for anyone living with depression.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ruchit

    the very common issue with depression in most of the case is you dont know you are clinically depressed. This book offers a journey of an author through depression. This book reveals interesting and important facts abut how it starts, symptoms, treatments, results etc. Book becomes a little slower when author gets too much into anecdotes of his personal life which sometimes are off the topic. However, this is a must read for all irrespective of you've experienced any illness or not.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rilaaa

    Moe offers a candid, multi-layered approach on the subject of depression, the challenges of work-life, the fallout of the disease in the lives of our loved ones, the tragedy of suicide, and the hereditary aspects of the disease, which are all important aspects in our conversation about depression. He touches upon how our childhood, our parents, and genetic destiny may predispose certain individuals toward depression, how trauma plays a sinister role in how we manifest the illness, and how humor Moe offers a candid, multi-layered approach on the subject of depression, the challenges of work-life, the fallout of the disease in the lives of our loved ones, the tragedy of suicide, and the hereditary aspects of the disease, which are all important aspects in our conversation about depression. He touches upon how our childhood, our parents, and genetic destiny may predispose certain individuals toward depression, how trauma plays a sinister role in how we manifest the illness, and how humor is just one of the ways some people cope and learn how to live with an illness that affects their lives and the people in it. As Moe outlines in the book, “I suspect that people with depression are fixated on the possibility of ambition being rewarded with happiness. Probably more than most people are. That’s because ambition about the future is a way of avoiding looking at a past that’s often pretty bleak or a future that is terrifying."

  22. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    Audiobook read by author. Wonderful. Comforting. A journey.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Em Stevens

    I listened to the Audiobook and HIGHLY recommend it. This is part memoir and part discussion about depression and anxiety. I feel like he describes depression in ways that make it accessible. I love the discussions on medications and varying therapy techniques. Comedy makes the medicine go down better. I can't recommend this enough to anyone trying to explain their depression to a loved one, to someone who suffers from depression, for someone who wants to understand it a bit more...I mean, basic I listened to the Audiobook and HIGHLY recommend it. This is part memoir and part discussion about depression and anxiety. I feel like he describes depression in ways that make it accessible. I love the discussions on medications and varying therapy techniques. Comedy makes the medicine go down better. I can't recommend this enough to anyone trying to explain their depression to a loved one, to someone who suffers from depression, for someone who wants to understand it a bit more...I mean, basically I think it would be good for everyone.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I've definitely laughed out loud a few times, but mostly I've been nodding my head in utter recognition, particularly the junior high sections. I'm at the the halfway point, and certain aspects remind me of elements of Derren Brown's "Happy," and the Stoic school of thought, such as, "depressed people tend to make good things into ugly messes to better match their state of mind," and "you can't shove a career achievement into a self-esteem-shaped hole," and how "imposter syndrome has some root c I've definitely laughed out loud a few times, but mostly I've been nodding my head in utter recognition, particularly the junior high sections. I'm at the the halfway point, and certain aspects remind me of elements of Derren Brown's "Happy," and the Stoic school of thought, such as, "depressed people tend to make good things into ugly messes to better match their state of mind," and "you can't shove a career achievement into a self-esteem-shaped hole," and how "imposter syndrome has some root comedic value. You have achieved something only to have depression yank it away" (i.e. "if *I* achieved it, it must not be that difficult / impressive" or "if *I* achieved it, it must not be worth much" all of which are issues of perception rather than reality).

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    I am going to read this book again and again...John Moe perfectly captures the realities of dealing with depression while having a family and career. I needed this book!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Arnold

    A wonderful and funny part-memoir, part-podcast adaptation that actually helped clarify my thinking on depression.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    ** I read an advance reader copy of this book I received from a Goodreads giveaway. ** This book is wonderful. The author shares his struggles with depression, from suffering without a diagnosis to issues finding a therapist to issues with medication to major setbacks. He pulls no punches, detailing the way his mind consistently works against him, talking about how suicide is always an option even when it's not wished for, talking about his brother's suicide and his father's alcoholism. He explai ** I read an advance reader copy of this book I received from a Goodreads giveaway. ** This book is wonderful. The author shares his struggles with depression, from suffering without a diagnosis to issues finding a therapist to issues with medication to major setbacks. He pulls no punches, detailing the way his mind consistently works against him, talking about how suicide is always an option even when it's not wished for, talking about his brother's suicide and his father's alcoholism. He explains why medication didn't always work for him (yes, you do need to take the pills on a regular schedule, not just when you're feeling the worst) and why therapy is so difficult (you have to be willing to see a therapist for more than one session and you have to find one who works with you -- his comparison of finding a therapist to the dating world is definitely on point!). I have suffered from major depression for as long as I can remember (and probably for longer that that) so there were many, many times I read something and said "Yes!!!! That's it exactly!!!". And that, sometimes more than anything else, is what someone with depression needs. Someone who understands. Someone who can put into words the whirlpool of feelings that goes with having depression. I often tell people that I'm not sure what happy is. I know what it looks like in other people, or at least what it looks like when they say they are happy, but I don't seem to be able to grasp it. However, as I've said in the past, I've managed to reach a point at which I am content with how I am. Yes, I always have suicidal thoughts. They float in the back of my head but I've learned ways to make them...quieter. Less obtrusive. And I have regular therapy appointments that I use as release valves. I don't always have something I need to talk about, in fact at this point in my life I often don't have anything I need to talk about but knowing that I have a standing appointment and someone who knows me and who will allow me to vent without overreacting is a big part of what keeps me content. The author of this book talks about many of the same things I deal with on a daily basis and that is a boost. I didn't know about the podcast before reading this book but I will definitely be checking it out now! Just knowing that someone can understand and is going through similar problems is a big relief to anyone with depression. So, if you do know someone who suffers from depression or if you do yourself, I would most definitely recommend this book!!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    When it is snowy and cold outside (and my car is buried under 2ft of ❄️ ), superspeed readers like me can read 250+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more today. LOL I requested and received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley, the publisher and the author in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not repeat the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it as they do it better than I do 😸. For years John Moe, critica When it is snowy and cold outside (and my car is buried under 2ft of ❄️ ), superspeed readers like me can read 250+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more today. LOL I requested and received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley, the publisher and the author in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not repeat the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it as they do it better than I do 😸. For years John Moe, critically-acclaimed public radio personality and host of The Hilarious World of Depression podcast struggled with depression; it plagued his family and claimed the life of his brother in 2007. As Moe came to terms with his own illness, he began to see similar patterns of behaviour and coping mechanisms surfacing in conversations with others, including high-profile comedians who’d struggled with the disease. Moe saw that there were tremendous comforts and community in open dialogue about these shared experiences and that humour had a unique power. Thus was born the podcast The Hilarious World of Depression. Inspired by the immediate success of the podcast, Moe has written a remarkable investigation of the disease, part memoir of his own journey, part treasure trove of laugh-out-loud stories and insights drawn from years of interviews with some of the most brilliant minds facing similar challenges. Throughout the course of this powerful narrative, depression’s universal themes come to light, among them, struggles with identity, lack of understanding of the symptoms, the challenges of work-life, self-medicating, the fallout of the disease in the lives of our loved ones, the tragedy of suicide, and the hereditary aspects of the disease. The Hilarious World of Depression illuminates depression in an entirely fresh and inspiring way. Unless you had or have depression, you may not see the hilarity in this book. I know that my family does not understand my depression(or, according to them. my lack of a sense of humour) but I laughed at this book as I have been there, done that and bought the postcard. The book is well written and moving and people with the disease and those in their family or circle of friends will enjoy it as well. Savour it as you read it - it is very moving.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jackson Matthews

    Incredible. I am going to lend it to a colleague thinking it will help her works with ACES. Mental illness can affect so many people, and it is not something where a person can "just get over it," which I would also like to point out to people who bully so badly that the trauma gets ingrained.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sebastian Bravo

    What a lovely book! From beginning to end, John Moe is such an endearing narrator taking us the through not so endearing topics and moments of his life, from his childhood trauma to the hard hitting moments of his adulthood. Honestly, I did not expect him to be funny or relatable because he does not speak too much in his podcast; he asks incisive questions, lets his guests speak, and he lets us listen to them trying to make sense of their experiences with mental illness, so it was an pleasant sur What a lovely book! From beginning to end, John Moe is such an endearing narrator taking us the through not so endearing topics and moments of his life, from his childhood trauma to the hard hitting moments of his adulthood. Honestly, I did not expect him to be funny or relatable because he does not speak too much in his podcast; he asks incisive questions, lets his guests speak, and he lets us listen to them trying to make sense of their experiences with mental illness, so it was an pleasant surprise to have him share his own experiences, and boy, are there some. I enjoyed his honesty and vulnerability throughout the book. I was heartbroken several times but also felt uplifted and relieved since I could relate and by extent, validate, a lot of my own experiences with depression and anxiety. All in all, I recommend to all who are looking for ways to explain or understand how mental illness works because it takes you through it, step by step, in a personal and meaningful journey.

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