kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

Half Life

Availability: Ready to download

An overachiever enrolls in an experimental clone study to prove that two (of her own) heads are better than one in this fast-paced, near-future adventure that's Black Mirror meets Becky Albertalli. There aren't enough hours in the day for Lucille--perfectionist, overachiever--to do everything she has to do, and there certainly aren't enough hours to hang out with friends, f An overachiever enrolls in an experimental clone study to prove that two (of her own) heads are better than one in this fast-paced, near-future adventure that's Black Mirror meets Becky Albertalli. There aren't enough hours in the day for Lucille--perfectionist, overachiever--to do everything she has to do, and there certainly aren't enough hours to hang out with friends, fall in love, get in trouble--all the teenage things she knows she should want to be doing instead of preparing for a flawless future. So when she sees an ad for Life2: Do more. Be more, she's intrigued. The company is looking for beta testers to enroll in an experimental clone program, and in the aftermath of a series of disappointments, Lucille is feeling reckless enough to jump in. At first, it's perfect: her clone, Lucy, is exactly what she needed to make her life manageable and have time for a social life. But it doesn't take long for Lucy to become more Lucy and less Lucille, and Lucille is forced to stop looking at Lucy as a reflection and start seeing her as a window--a glimpse at someone else living her own life, but better. Lucy does what she really wants to, not what she thinks she should want to, and Lucille is left wondering how much she was even a part of the perfect life she'd constructed for herself. Lucille wanted Lucy to help her relationships with everyone else, but how can she do that without first rectifying her relationship with herself?


Compare
kode adsense disini

An overachiever enrolls in an experimental clone study to prove that two (of her own) heads are better than one in this fast-paced, near-future adventure that's Black Mirror meets Becky Albertalli. There aren't enough hours in the day for Lucille--perfectionist, overachiever--to do everything she has to do, and there certainly aren't enough hours to hang out with friends, f An overachiever enrolls in an experimental clone study to prove that two (of her own) heads are better than one in this fast-paced, near-future adventure that's Black Mirror meets Becky Albertalli. There aren't enough hours in the day for Lucille--perfectionist, overachiever--to do everything she has to do, and there certainly aren't enough hours to hang out with friends, fall in love, get in trouble--all the teenage things she knows she should want to be doing instead of preparing for a flawless future. So when she sees an ad for Life2: Do more. Be more, she's intrigued. The company is looking for beta testers to enroll in an experimental clone program, and in the aftermath of a series of disappointments, Lucille is feeling reckless enough to jump in. At first, it's perfect: her clone, Lucy, is exactly what she needed to make her life manageable and have time for a social life. But it doesn't take long for Lucy to become more Lucy and less Lucille, and Lucille is forced to stop looking at Lucy as a reflection and start seeing her as a window--a glimpse at someone else living her own life, but better. Lucy does what she really wants to, not what she thinks she should want to, and Lucille is left wondering how much she was even a part of the perfect life she'd constructed for herself. Lucille wanted Lucy to help her relationships with everyone else, but how can she do that without first rectifying her relationship with herself?

30 review for Half Life

  1. 4 out of 5

    The Clever Reader

    Have you ever wanted or needed to be in two places at once? Half Life has the solution for you! You just go in, get some tests done, and they'll grow you a clone. Lucille is uptight and academically driven and because she's that way she often skips out on living life. When she realizes her best friend isn't making her a priority anymore and she's been wait listed for the program she's worked so hard to get into she starts to feel the pressure of loneliness. To top it off her parents have just tol Have you ever wanted or needed to be in two places at once? Half Life has the solution for you! You just go in, get some tests done, and they'll grow you a clone. Lucille is uptight and academically driven and because she's that way she often skips out on living life. When she realizes her best friend isn't making her a priority anymore and she's been wait listed for the program she's worked so hard to get into she starts to feel the pressure of loneliness. To top it off her parents have just told her their getting a divorce. Then she receives an email with an offer she can't refuse. Lucy. Not Lucille. These are some of the first things Lucy realizes when she wakes up. She's a carbon copy of Lucille but why does being called Lucille bother her so much? Lucy has been created using Lucille's genetics and is her exact clone but as the story progresses she comes to realize that she may look and sound like Lucille but she has other ideas about how she wants to live her life. I thought the concept of this book was really cool. Who wouldn't want to be able to do all the things they want to without having to give everything up. I liked that Lucy and Lucille realize that even when there's two of them it's not perfect. Lucy doesn't want to be told what to do and where to be all the time and Lucille realizes that it's a lot more stressful worrying about getting caught than it would've been to have life be the same. I liked that each one of them still had their own identities and dreams in life. It was like Lucy had the qualities naturally that Lucille didn't. They even fell for two different guys that fit each one of them individually. I would recommend this to anyone looking for a fun and unique sci-fi contemporary.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Caleb Roehrig

    I really loved this. It’s Emma Mills meets Black Mirror—a story about individuality, identity, and relationships told against a fascinating sci-fi backdrop. Lillian Clark does such a great job of writing realistically bumpy friendships, charming banter, and prickly, lovably “unlikable” girls, and it’s all here.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jacqueline Firkins

    Half Life was a fascinating read. In turns scientific, psychological, and suspenseful. The first half (pun sort of intended) sets us up with a build toward the split/half lives that develop at the midpoint of the novel. Clark probes into how easily a young girl (or, let's face it, anyone) can get stuck in a trap of not feeling good enough, thereby becoming her own worst enemy in her need for human connection. It's all very relatable and I think teen readers (and, let's face it, anyone) will be n Half Life was a fascinating read. In turns scientific, psychological, and suspenseful. The first half (pun sort of intended) sets us up with a build toward the split/half lives that develop at the midpoint of the novel. Clark probes into how easily a young girl (or, let's face it, anyone) can get stuck in a trap of not feeling good enough, thereby becoming her own worst enemy in her need for human connection. It's all very relatable and I think teen readers (and, let's face it, anyone) will be nodding along to some of the passages, thinking, "Yes! That!" The book truly took off for me though at that midpoint when the two girls were put side by side and we shifted into rapidly unfolding dramatic action. The tension got pulled way up. The themes became more layered. Even the language makes a shift, and I loved the mirror between form and content. We know s**t's hitting the fan and we're a looong way from stasis. There are so many layers to the duality and half-ness of these girls. The ethics. The psychology. The confusion about what to do and be and think. The existentialist crisis of it all. There's also a spectacular level of suspense. What will happen when/if two girls assumed to be one are uncovered as more than two halves of a whole? For those wondering, there is some romance but it serves to support the character arcs of the two girls rather than becoming the focus of the story. No one in this novel was two dimensional, even--and especially--the girl created from scratch. Throughout the work, Clark weaves her signature wit, giving us banter that helps us feel the bonds that form within families and friendships. It's a book you'll want to talk to your friends about, and those, I think, are the best kinds of books.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Gita Trelease

    Half Life is smart, fascinating, and utterly compelling. Lillian Clark slips just-out-of-reach tech into real-world suburban America, and as the stakes get higher, it's chilling to see what comes from an ambitious girl's desire to be perfect and to have it all. There's a bit of a Frankenstein theme in the novel but with a serious twist—creepy but also packing an emotional punch. I dare you not to devour it in one sitting.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jypsy

    Thank you FFBC for a complimentary copy. I voluntarily reviewed this book. All opinions expressed are my own. Half Life By: Lillian Clark REVIEW ☆☆☆☆ I would like to order one clone of myself, please. Sounds fun, right? Maybe not? In Half Life, sixteen year old Lucille is feeling the pressure of taking tests, getting into the right school, daily tasks, etc. In other words, life. She decides to join an experimental program that will clone her. My thinking is that a clone should do whatever its ori Thank you FFBC for a complimentary copy. I voluntarily reviewed this book. All opinions expressed are my own. Half Life By: Lillian Clark REVIEW ☆☆☆☆ I would like to order one clone of myself, please. Sounds fun, right? Maybe not? In Half Life, sixteen year old Lucille is feeling the pressure of taking tests, getting into the right school, daily tasks, etc. In other words, life. She decides to join an experimental program that will clone her. My thinking is that a clone should do whatever its originator tells it to do. Lucille's clone, Lucy, acts independently. The idea is that Lucy will take care of the menial tedious things of day to day life, and Lucille will be free to do as she pleases. Personally, I would not leave this type of responsibility in the hands of an autonomous clone because it could seriously mess up your life. Lucille is too young for this kind of decision making, and her bad choices soon come calling. This is a very compelling story that raises questions about ethical and moral issues and taking responsibility for your life. Lucille is naive and has a lot of growing up to do. Lucy is like the alter ego representing daydreams and wishes come true. She is fun when reality is not. Lucille is learning what an unpolished Instagram life looks like. The ideas in this story are perfect for discussion among young adult readers. They are the ideal audience and would likely find the premise highly appealing and plausible. While it's a bit too unbelievable for me, I did enjoy the story overall. I was engaged and wanting to know more because it is a fascinating concept. This story is good for any age with an interest in the subject, as well as fans of numerous genres because it spans a few of these. I mean, seriously, who couldn't use a clone of themselves?

  6. 5 out of 5

    Dahlia

    This was really stressful in a fun and unputdownable way. Science! Family stuff! Friend stuff! Romance! A clone who very much has her own mind and sort of wreaks havoc but in the most endearing and sympathetic way! Anyway this was a lot of fun and I’ve never seen Black Mirror but it still feels like that’s a very good Comp.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    This was one of the most enjoyable reads of the year for me! I absolutely loved where the author took this story! Can you imagine a time where I society can not only clone humans successfully, but also clone them into adults? And then you could have another you? Well, Clark wrote a beautifully done story with that plot. And, I have to tell you, given the advancements in science and tech, it’s a little crazy to imagine what that would mean for the world. But, this story is about a young teen named L This was one of the most enjoyable reads of the year for me! I absolutely loved where the author took this story! Can you imagine a time where I society can not only clone humans successfully, but also clone them into adults? And then you could have another you? Well, Clark wrote a beautifully done story with that plot. And, I have to tell you, given the advancements in science and tech, it’s a little crazy to imagine what that would mean for the world. But, this story is about a young teen named Lucille who–without the consent of her parents–decides to go through the process of making another ‘her’ so that she can live her best life. Lucille is a little bit of a high-strung individual… Kind of a type A personality. So, when her life starts to get a little crazy and she starts to flounder, this seems the best way to navigate it. From this point on, we get to see Lucille–and Lucy her clone–deal with life, family, friends, school (and EACH OTHER!!) in surprising and difficult ways. Lucille is not a perfect heroine. I mean, the girl’s 17. And I have to say that she has normal teen struggles. I think seeing Lucy and Lucille grow their own relationship was one of the best parts of this story for me. I loved it! I only wish there were going to be a sequel!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Coon

    Update 1: I read read an early version of this contemporary sci-fi, and Lillian Clark is a master storyteller genius. The world-building here is *mwah.* ADD IT TO YOUR TBR LIST IMMEDIATELY. Update 2: I loved this book so much I blurbed it. Here it is: "With quick wit and keen intelligence, HALF LIFE dazzles as it holds up a black mirror to a future just around the bend. I'm completely blown away by this story."

  9. 4 out of 5

    Shannon (It Starts At Midnight)

    You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight . 4.5* This was quite the entertaining book! At first, I was a wee bit iffy, I must admit. It seemed fairly contemporary, and I wasn't a huge fan of Lucille when the book opens. But I think that is deliberate, so keep with it! Because Lucille is about to go through all kinds of stuff that will absolutely force her to look at who she is and who she wants to be. When Lucille accepts the crypt You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight . 4.5* This was quite the entertaining book! At first, I was a wee bit iffy, I must admit. It seemed fairly contemporary, and I wasn't a huge fan of Lucille when the book opens. But I think that is deliberate, so keep with it! Because Lucille is about to go through all kinds of stuff that will absolutely force her to look at who she is and who she wants to be. When Lucille accepts the cryptic offer from the company who ultimately makes her clone, things are going downhill, and fast. Which makes sense, because Lucille, usually prideful of her rationality, wouldn't do such a thing unless she felt desperate. But desperate she feels, so when Life2 starts to feel more and more unsettling, she keeps getting in more over her head with each passing day. The author painted this realistically, because I was never thinking "why would anyone be this gullible?" because the reader was made to understand exactly why Lucille was feeling so despondent. Her parents are divorcing, her dreams are being extinguished left and right, and she's having a big falling out with her friend. And for Lucille, who is quite the perfectionist, this is especially harrowing. Enter Lucy, the clone, and things get even more exciting! And, very thought provoking. Because it asks all the big questions, and even better, not just of the reader, but the characters themselves. And without giving away too much, the characters are all going to have to do a lot of soul searching. I have to say that I could not stop reading, especially after Lucy comes into the mix. There's even a mystery element to the story, which adds to the excitement! And I promise, it all wraps up in a very satisfying way. Bottom Line: So thought-provoking and engaging, I couldn't help but root for our two main characters- no matter that one was a clone!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    I requested this book on NetGalley despite the few reviews from previous ARC readers and my enormous list of to-be-read books because the description of it seemed wild. This book did not disappoint. Sixteen-year-old Lucille has lived her life trying to live up to the expectations of her friends, family, and teachers. When everything in her life starts to crumble, Lucille decides to take a risk to "Do More. Be More" to try to maintain her identity as a high achiever. So instead of doing what most I requested this book on NetGalley despite the few reviews from previous ARC readers and my enormous list of to-be-read books because the description of it seemed wild. This book did not disappoint. Sixteen-year-old Lucille has lived her life trying to live up to the expectations of her friends, family, and teachers. When everything in her life starts to crumble, Lucille decides to take a risk to "Do More. Be More" to try to maintain her identity as a high achiever. So instead of doing what most teens do when faced with life's troubles, Lucille decides to sign up to be part of an experimental cloning experiment. She'll get a clone of herself who can take care of the daily tasks like keeping up relationships with her family and going to school, so Lucille can do whatever she wants in her own time. Sounds great, what could go wrong?! This book was incredibly engaging, with just a few slow moments in the middle in the midst of the experiment. The last third of the book was a real page turner. Lucille's narrative voice was engaging and unique. I was nervous that adding a clone would muddy this, but Clark manages to make their voices distinct and clear. My only issue with this one was the pacing at the end. I thought there were a few loose ends that didn't get tied up, and while those definitely weren't the main "points" of the book, I left having a lot of questions about logistics that I thought could have been addressed with another chapter or two. This book is a great piece for teens to think about morality, ethics, identity, and expectations. I can see this starting some great conversations in a classroom.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Fanna

    March 10, 2020: Did I just read Black Mirror in the blurb? ALRIGHT, I really need this REALLY.NEED.THIS.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Dini Kamayana

    Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for the e-ARC in exchange for an honest review. Thanks also to the FFBC for including me on the blog tour for this book! 3.5 stars. Pun not intended but I’m half-half on how I feel about this book. This ended up being quite different to what I expected. It's more contemporary with sci-fi elements and I think I expected more futuristic sci-fi than it being set in the ‘present day’. I enjoyed the latter half of the book much more than the first half, but I also Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for the e-ARC in exchange for an honest review. Thanks also to the FFBC for including me on the blog tour for this book! 3.5 stars. Pun not intended but I’m half-half on how I feel about this book. This ended up being quite different to what I expected. It's more contemporary with sci-fi elements and I think I expected more futuristic sci-fi than it being set in the ‘present day’. I enjoyed the latter half of the book much more than the first half, but I also thought that the ending was very abrupt and all the issues were resolved too easily to be believed—even after having already suspended my disbelief from the start. Half Life follows Lucille, an overachieving, extremely self-absorbed high school sophomore who is obsessed with perfection — she along with everything in her life must be perfect, but it seems the more she tries, the harder everything becomes. So when things start falling even more apart and she deeply questions her self-worth, she does The Drastic Thing™️ and... decides to participate in a secret cloning program that has chosen her as their perfect candidate. I remember what it’s like to be that age and while certain things that happened with/to her would’ve definitely had me reacting the same way, it was still hard to feel empathy/sympathy for her. There was something about Lucille that made her unlikable, which made it difficult to feel invested in the story, and I honestly much preferred Lucy’s character. As I mentioned before, things begin to pick up in the second half of the book and we also get alternating perspectives from both Lucille and Lucy. From the start there was already a feeling of ‘foreboding’ but that increased exponentially with the introduction of Lucy. It was really interesting to see how, despite being a facsimile of Lucille, her tone of voice and views were markedly different. I admittedly haven’t thought a lot about the ethics of cloning but I really enjoyed that we explore those questions through the lens of a (sentient) clone. I also liked how Clark explored the idea of a person's truth--how others perceive something might not be the same as you do, and how important self-acceptance is. It did make me think about what it would be like to be in this situation. If I had a clone of myself, how differently would she (it?) perceive the things that happened to us (me) and how different would our reactions be? With the already interesting backdrop of the story I thought all these ideas were uniquely explored although ultimately I found that there was a certain lack of "punch" to the story, and I think that might have to do with how rushed the climax/ending felt. Everything, especially the tension, built up very nicely throughout the story but the ending was, in my opinion, a bit of "womp womp" moment. I was shocked that when I checked how much further in the book I had to go, I saw that I was already at the 93% mark, while the thrilling action was just kicking off! Again, all the drama was resolved very easily and while I don’t know how I was expecting characters in the story to react, this full acceptance of a completely bizarro situation, with only a few bats of the eye, was pretty unbelievable. 🤷🏻‍♀️ There were also elements that didn't make sense, like how an advanced experimental lab such as this didn't have cameras everywhere or better security? It added to the whole 'this is totally unlikely, but okay' feeling I got from the ending. As a whole though, I really liked the concept of Half Life. I haven’t read many books about or with the subject of cloning and so that was already a big plus from the go. I also have to mention that while there was a bit of scientific jargon at the start, Clark’s writing is accessible and the content didn’t end up being confusing or overwhelming to digest, even for someone like me who has very limited knowledge of the science stuff 🤣 While the book ended up being quite different to what I expected, it was still a pretty fast and enjoyable read and I'm glad I gave it a go!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Maddie

    I absolutely adore this book! First off, the voice in this is absolutely incredible. It felt like I was reading my sixteen year old self's thoughts again! I was also enthralled with the plot from the beginning. It was an absolute page-turner dripping with suspense and uncertainty at every new turn of the plot. The ending was an absolute surprise, but in a delightful way. I could not have guess that is how everything would turn out. The cloning was cool, the relationships are super cool, the VOIC I absolutely adore this book! First off, the voice in this is absolutely incredible. It felt like I was reading my sixteen year old self's thoughts again! I was also enthralled with the plot from the beginning. It was an absolute page-turner dripping with suspense and uncertainty at every new turn of the plot. The ending was an absolute surprise, but in a delightful way. I could not have guess that is how everything would turn out. The cloning was cool, the relationships are super cool, the VOICE again! The clear distinction between Lucy and Lucille was phenomenal. Second off, it's SO nice reading a book set in my home state that gets the environment right. My hometown also gets an honorary shout-out so I'm like further indebted to this book and the author for that very proud moment. Overall, I loved every second of this book. I'm also very biased because I too was once a 16 year old over-achiever begging for a second version of myself so I could be the Best™ while living in the state of Colorado, but also the ethical discussion was a nice touch and something 16 year old me never considered so. That's that.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jen Ryland

    This book was ... a journey. Contemporary YA meets Black Mirror meets The Parent Trap. For the first third, it reads like a contemporary YA, with Lucille's POV. She's a model student who is suddenly thrown by her parents' divorce and a friend break-up. So behind everyone's back she decides to clone herself. Things got a bit more confusing as her clone is finished and adds her POV. Their parts are marked as "Lucy" (clone) and "Lucille." Lucille decides to go off and have fun and let Lucy the clone This book was ... a journey. Contemporary YA meets Black Mirror meets The Parent Trap. For the first third, it reads like a contemporary YA, with Lucille's POV. She's a model student who is suddenly thrown by her parents' divorce and a friend break-up. So behind everyone's back she decides to clone herself. Things got a bit more confusing as her clone is finished and adds her POV. Their parts are marked as "Lucy" (clone) and "Lucille." Lucille decides to go off and have fun and let Lucy the clone take over her life. And of course things don't go as planned at all. Then the book turns into a bit of a thriller as you wonder how long Lucy/Lucille can keep their secret. Lucy finds out some alarming information. All in all, I did enjoy this. The tone and feel of the book was a little inconsistent and I found that jarring at times, but by the end I was glad I read it. Read more of my reviews on JenRyland.com! Let's be friends on Bookstagram! Thanks to the publisher for providing an advance copy for review!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Nowiczewski

    This was a great YA read! I thought the characters, plot, and pace were well crafted. I loved Lucille's self-doubt and insecurity, her uncertainty. I appreciated the way her character developed. The treatment of Lucy as a wholly developing entity was a departure from the normal treatment of 'clones' in science fiction, and I loved her so much. The supporting characters were fabulous and the mom, especially, cracked me up. Clark worked her bioethics debate in with finesse and balanced it well wit This was a great YA read! I thought the characters, plot, and pace were well crafted. I loved Lucille's self-doubt and insecurity, her uncertainty. I appreciated the way her character developed. The treatment of Lucy as a wholly developing entity was a departure from the normal treatment of 'clones' in science fiction, and I loved her so much. The supporting characters were fabulous and the mom, especially, cracked me up. Clark worked her bioethics debate in with finesse and balanced it well with the ever-popular (but always relevant) theme of self-discovery in adolescence. GREAT READ! Thanks to #netgalley and #HarperCollins for the opportunity to read this ARC

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kristy Alley

    Lucille is an overachiever who never feels like she's good enough. A sinister company is able to prey on her insecurities to lure her into being secretly cloned with the promise of having two "selves" to lighten the burden of daily life, but things don't turn out the way she planned. Self cloning is my favorite sci-fi trope, so I was really excited to see this new YA take on it and I was NOT disappointed! I think this book will also appeal to readers who may not think of themselves as sci-fi fan Lucille is an overachiever who never feels like she's good enough. A sinister company is able to prey on her insecurities to lure her into being secretly cloned with the promise of having two "selves" to lighten the burden of daily life, but things don't turn out the way she planned. Self cloning is my favorite sci-fi trope, so I was really excited to see this new YA take on it and I was NOT disappointed! I think this book will also appeal to readers who may not think of themselves as sci-fi fans, because it deal with real-life issues like impostor syndrome, friendship breakups, and first love. I will definitely be ordering this one for my school library!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kara McDowell

    Half Life is a smart and funny and page-turner and I loved every minute of it.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jillian

    [This review is also posted on jillian etc., my blog.] Clark's Half Life follows the story of Lucille Harper: a high school sophomore, student perfectionist, and overachiever. While her efforts prove her success and outstanding academic performance in high school, she finds herself in a difficult situation with both family and friends. Thus, after seeing an advertisement from Life Squared, she agrees to participate in an experimental clone study that will provide her with a duplicate of herself: [This review is also posted on jillian etc., my blog.] Clark's Half Life follows the story of Lucille Harper: a high school sophomore, student perfectionist, and overachiever. While her efforts prove her success and outstanding academic performance in high school, she finds herself in a difficult situation with both family and friends. Thus, after seeing an advertisement from Life Squared, she agrees to participate in an experimental clone study that will provide her with a duplicate of herself: one who could perform her duties well and make her life more manageable. However, in doing so, contention arises when Lucille realizes that her life was no longer hers to live. Of all the young adult novels I have read, I found Half Life to be original and creative as its own. Seldom do I find science-fictional novels that explore the realm of science and impossibility against a contemporary backdrop, specifically in the life of a struggling high school student. The author's take on science fiction was done in an intriguing manner, capturing my interest more so by the idea of a human duplicate. In this book, Clark relates her protagonist, Lucille, with young readers by offering a fresh perspective into relationships, ethics, and perfectionism. I loved reading about Lucille and her struggles with her relationships. Somehow, I found that this has subtly resonated with me when I was in high school, and I can ascertain that Half Life can likewise relate with many young readers. Although the writing style could be better, this book was nonetheless enjoyable and fun to read. From the moment Lucille's clone was introduced, I was entertained as the book picked up on the suspense of what will happen next, having me reeling with anticipation. A human duplicate of a struggling high school student made me question how the protagonist can regain her control back after her clone decides to live her life a different way. How contentious would it be to be two different people at once, yet be known as a singular individual by everyone around you? What would happen if someone figured out that she wasn't who they thought she was all along? Everything about this book and its sequence of events are as intriguing as its science-fictional aspects. A quick read and a breeze to go through, Half Life sufficiently captures the question of ethics and moral principles surrounding the process of cloning, while introducing to its readers the struggles of teenhood.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lizz DiCesare

    If you had the option to clone yourself, would you? I know, it sounds wild, but having two versions of yourself means you could do and be so much more, right? Well, that’s what Lucille Harper, the main character in Half Life by Lillian Clark, thinks. But what we want isn’t always what we get. I remember the first book I ever read about clones. I don’t remember what it was called (I borrowed it from the library when I was in elementary school, back in the 90s), but I remember what it was about: a If you had the option to clone yourself, would you? I know, it sounds wild, but having two versions of yourself means you could do and be so much more, right? Well, that’s what Lucille Harper, the main character in Half Life by Lillian Clark, thinks. But what we want isn’t always what we get. I remember the first book I ever read about clones. I don’t remember what it was called (I borrowed it from the library when I was in elementary school, back in the 90s), but I remember what it was about: a young girl with a seemingly great life finds out her super rich parents keep cloning her because she’s sick and they need body parts for surgery to keep her alive. It bothered me so much I vowed to never read anything about clones again. Since then, I’ve read a couple others, but figured it was time to give another book a chance. In Half Life, we meet Lucille, who is truly pushing herself to her limits. She’s a high school student trying to get the best marks, get accepted to the best schools, work part time, study for the SATs, and do it all perfectly. On top of this, her parents recently announced their (very unexpected) divorce. That, paired with a rejection letter for a summer internship, sets her over the edge. Lucille signs up for a trial program with a company called Life2. She’ll get a clone for a couple weeks, and then simply return it afterwards. What could possibly go wrong? Obviously, a lot of things. What Lucille thinks will be a routine couple of weeks quickly begins to go sideways. Her clone, Lucy, isn’t some brain-dead copy that will just follow along and listen. She might have Lucille’s looks and memories, but she has a mind of her own and wants autonomy. This book was great because yes, it has a lot of YA themes (romance, high school drama, stress over applying to college), but it also wove in themes of morality, ethics, and identity. Lucy might be a clone of Lucille, but their personalities are not the same; at the end of the day, they are two very different people. I also really enjoyed how many different genres were blended together in Half Life. There are elements of YA contemporary, science fiction, and a bit of mystery/thriller thrown in as well. It’s a fast paced story that will keep you on your seat and entertained until the very end. Thank you to Penguin Random House Canada for a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Half Life by Lillian Clark came out on June 9, 2020, and can be purchased wherever books are sold.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Elaine

    Thank you to NetGalley for an ARC of Half Life. I used to read more YA books but stopped years ago when they all began to sound the same. Still, when a premise intrigues me, I'll give the book a try, YA or not, so I was pleased when my request was approved. ** Minor spoilers ahead ** I love the sci-fi concept; who wouldn't want a doppelganger to help you navigate a busy life? That's what Lucille Harper does. An extreme overachiever struggling with her parents' divorce and losing her best friend Thank you to NetGalley for an ARC of Half Life. I used to read more YA books but stopped years ago when they all began to sound the same. Still, when a premise intrigues me, I'll give the book a try, YA or not, so I was pleased when my request was approved. ** Minor spoilers ahead ** I love the sci-fi concept; who wouldn't want a doppelganger to help you navigate a busy life? That's what Lucille Harper does. An extreme overachiever struggling with her parents' divorce and losing her best friend to a boyfriend, Lucille desires to be accepted, to be wanted, to be desired. When an opportunity allows her to have her cake and eat it, too (spend time with her family and go to school while she pursues more engaging activities), she jumps at the chance to be cloned. Naturally, all is not what it seems. Her clone, Lucy, is an empathetic, kind young woman, with a mind and abilities and talents of her own. When she develops an identity far faster than her handlers could ever have imagined, Lucy and Lucille must work together to protect each other. First, I didn't like Lucille. She was a brat, lacked self esteem and spoke constantly about how 'perfect' she thought life was but wasn't after her parents split up. I get it, she's only 16, she's naive and sheltered, but I thought that was such an ignorant perspective, especially coming from an educated young woman. Nothing is perfect. Second, Lucille is crushing hard on an artsy kind of guy named Bode, but her constant pining and desire to be wanted left me with a bad taste in my mouth. I don't know why she believed that once a boy liked her it was validation of her self worth. Not every young woman thinks her life will be complete if someone desires her. Third, it was no surprise that the evil scientists are...well, mostly evil. Nearly all of them are one dimensional bad guys, concerned only with making a miraculous scientific breakthrough that will change the course of humanity and not thinking about all the lives and clones lost in the process. The concept of souls and identity comes up often but the author doesn't spend enough time on it. Lucy develops self awareness very quickly. Why? Because she's Lucille or a part of Lucille? Or, because she's an individual separate from Lucille, like identical twins have the same DNA but are two wholly different and unique people? There are typical tropes here you find in every YA book; handsome boy(s) Lucille is too shy to talk too; losing touch with her BFF, confusion and anxiety about her life and future. The premise was great, but befitting a YA novel, there were some moments you really had to suspend disbelief for; how Lucille was chosen to be the next person to be cloned, how her parents had connections that enabled them to find where Lucy was being taken, how quickly and easily everything is wrapped up in the end. A part of me thought Half Life was going to be a little Gemini Man (not a good example, I know, since it wasn't a good movie) but, suspenseful and exciting, at least. It wasn't; there was plenty of talk between friends, conversations, boyfriend/girlfriend interaction and less sci-fi drama than I was hoping for. I did like her parents; decent, supportive people who listened and assisted their daughters when they discovered what Lucille had done. Oh, and there was a brief reference to sexual identity. Allo. I've never heard of this term before and I had to look it up. It was mentioned only a couple of times but the mere mention of it felt contrived, as if the author just threw it in there to look like she was covering all her bases in terms of sexual identity. Nothing else pertaining to sexual identity was made other than that term. Some readers will love Half Life. I didn't, and I really wanted to.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Fazila

    FOLLOW ME ON : TWITTER INSTAGRAM REVIEW : DISCLAIMER : Thank you, Netgalley and Knopf Books for Young Readers for providing me with an ARC of this book. I am leaving this review voluntarily. Half Life by Lillian Clark is a YA Sci-Fi novel that tells the story of Lucille, an overachieving teenager who joins an experimental clone-development program to help resolve her problems. After a constant stream of failures and disappointments in her life, she decides to have one more of her will help remove FOLLOW ME ON : TWITTER INSTAGRAM REVIEW : DISCLAIMER : Thank you, Netgalley and Knopf Books for Young Readers for providing me with an ARC of this book. I am leaving this review voluntarily. Half Life by Lillian Clark is a YA Sci-Fi novel that tells the story of Lucille, an overachieving teenager who joins an experimental clone-development program to help resolve her problems. After a constant stream of failures and disappointments in her life, she decides to have one more of her will help remove the issues she has. She can be the perfect daughter, perfect student, and the perfect friend and still find time for some fun. Lucille is not the perfect heroine one would expect, she is flawed, self-absorbed, and has issues with communicating with people around her. She hides behind her snark and at times uses jokes to take attention off her. The whole cloning experiment and set up was creepy and weird in a good way. It added to the tension in the story and hooks the reader to the plot very quickly. Lucy was my favorite character in the book and her ability to become more than a clone was wonderful to read about. I really enjoyed the characters and their interactions. There were some funny, cute, and adorable moments. I really loved the romance in this book. I felt it was realistically portrayed. The book is more than science fiction. The issues of self-worth, confidence, teenage pressures, and perfectionism were masterfully portrayed in this story. There is also a commentary of bioethics that arises in situations like the cloning experiment. I felt it was executed superbly. The character progression and the dual perspective helped connect with the characters and their problems. Overall it was a quick enjoyable read with great elements that will appeal to the YA audience. I gave the book 4.5 stars and I highly recommend checking it out.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Katherine

    The story follows sixteen year Lucille Harper, who is constantly labelled as an overachiever. She weigh almost everything logically, facts over emotions. Then one day everything begins to change as she enroll herself in an advanced experimental program. The company, Life2 is a multi billion dollar company making exceptional progress on scientific advancements with a prime focus on cloning. And Lucille happens to be an ideal candidate for this. Lucille expected her life to get simpler. With Lucy, The story follows sixteen year Lucille Harper, who is constantly labelled as an overachiever. She weigh almost everything logically, facts over emotions. Then one day everything begins to change as she enroll herself in an advanced experimental program. The company, Life2 is a multi billion dollar company making exceptional progress on scientific advancements with a prime focus on cloning. And Lucille happens to be an ideal candidate for this. Lucille expected her life to get simpler. With Lucy, her clone, everything was supposed to be manageable. But as the story progresses, Lucy starts to develop her separate traits from that of Lucille, becoming more like an individual. What happens when Life2 finds out? Monitoring Lucy's every emotion, the company is extremely protective of their investment. And troubles are just getting started for both of them. I am an avid science fiction reader, whenever I see a sci-fi book, I immediately make it my priority to read it. I was genuinely intrigued by the blurb of Half Life, it sounded fascinating and ultimate verdict - it did not disappoint. I think the concept was awesome and the author took time in fleshing out the characters as well as the plot to their potential. I could highly related to Lucille and when people described her as an overachiever I felt so furious because there is no harm in having an ambition. I also like the scientific terminologies and technological advancements that were included in the story which made it a wholesome Sci-Fi novel. I was completely immersed in the story and by the time I reached the second half of the book, it was unputdownable. Half Life was one of the most exciting read of 2020 and I enjoyed every minute of it. Highly recommend it

  23. 5 out of 5

    Willow

    Half Life is about Lucille Harper, a 16 year old overachiever. So, when she receives an email from Lifesquared, a mysterious company with the slogan "be more, do more", she is intrigued. Turns out, this company is one of the first with the knowledge and technology to clone people, and Lucille is their candidate. But her clone, Lucy, turns out to be different than she imagined. One of the things I really liked about this book was the imagery. As a girl who has so many high expectations for hersel Half Life is about Lucille Harper, a 16 year old overachiever. So, when she receives an email from Lifesquared, a mysterious company with the slogan "be more, do more", she is intrigued. Turns out, this company is one of the first with the knowledge and technology to clone people, and Lucille is their candidate. But her clone, Lucy, turns out to be different than she imagined. One of the things I really liked about this book was the imagery. As a girl who has so many high expectations for herself, Lucille also has a lot of anxiety, and the way that the author describes the feeling is so creative, while also being accurate. I also loved Lucille's voice. From the beginning, she is relatable, and funny, allowing readers to connect with her right away. Aside from how well written this book is, it's also really intriguing. It manages to address important issues such as self worth, and the value in loving yourself, all in the context of cloning. I think we've all thought about cloning before, and what that would look like, but Half Life opened my eyes to things that I had never considered about it. Like, is a clone more than what it is? A copy? Or is a clone its own person? **i received an ARC of this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review**

  24. 5 out of 5

    Briana

    Okay, idk what it is with sci fi novels lately, but they are COMPLETELY missing their mark. How did so many people give this four stars? The premise was interesting, sure, but it was basically that Paul Rudd Netflix show Living With Yourself but with a teenage girl. A teenage girl, who, by the way, was AWFUL. She was so obnoxious and self righteous, and her clone was no better. Neither of them were likable or redeemable and I forced myself to suffer through this because I’m sick of DNFing books. Okay, idk what it is with sci fi novels lately, but they are COMPLETELY missing their mark. How did so many people give this four stars? The premise was interesting, sure, but it was basically that Paul Rudd Netflix show Living With Yourself but with a teenage girl. A teenage girl, who, by the way, was AWFUL. She was so obnoxious and self righteous, and her clone was no better. Neither of them were likable or redeemable and I forced myself to suffer through this because I’m sick of DNFing books. I‘m more sick of terrible books with no plot and terrible writing, which is exactly what this was. She literally uttered the phrase “who gives a bug’s fart” at one point. What the hell? No. It was impossible to care about Lucille or Lucy, and the “big reveal” was something so obvious I’m not even sure it should be allowed to be considered a twist. This whole book was also just full of nothings and other flat side characters and bullshit romances that didn’t even make any sense, and then it ended with barely a resolution. No one was responsible for their actions and consequences were nowhere to be found. I promise you this is not your next great summer read.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mack Westwood

    --a story where the "real" Lucille is less human than the clone --a manifesto into the way society basically shits on and discards women --a nod to the perfectionism teens face from demands of society, parents, and performative pressure --a friendship that is both expanding and dissolving in the wake of misunderstandings Half Life by Lillian Clark ticked off all of these boxes and still left room for wit, a fluffy furball, some romance even though that's not the point, and the a mutually agreed up --a story where the "real" Lucille is less human than the clone --a manifesto into the way society basically shits on and discards women --a nod to the perfectionism teens face from demands of society, parents, and performative pressure --a friendship that is both expanding and dissolving in the wake of misunderstandings Half Life by Lillian Clark ticked off all of these boxes and still left room for wit, a fluffy furball, some romance even though that's not the point, and the a mutually agreed upon divorce. I sped through this in two days which is not my normal reading speed...i'm needing whatever else this author writes immediately.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Amanda (MetalPhantasmReads)

    *DNF @37%* **NetGalley ARC** I liked the idea of girl getting cloned but this wasn't exactly what I expected. I think with being at least a decade older than the protagonist made it hard to relate to her. She's really rude, selfish and not likable which is something I personally find it hard to relate to. The cloning was for a very selfish reason in my opinion. Plus the pacing wasn't great and the science was interesting but this just didn't hold my attention. I do think that TEEN readers will rel *DNF @37%* **NetGalley ARC** I liked the idea of girl getting cloned but this wasn't exactly what I expected. I think with being at least a decade older than the protagonist made it hard to relate to her. She's really rude, selfish and not likable which is something I personally find it hard to relate to. The cloning was for a very selfish reason in my opinion. Plus the pacing wasn't great and the science was interesting but this just didn't hold my attention. I do think that TEEN readers will relate to it more but this wasn't my cup of tea...

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ben VonArchimboldi

    First, great story with great writing. Second, this is the good kind of YA where we don’t pretend 16 year olds aren’t cursing and being normal people. Here’s the thing I dig the most. The voice (voices) of the characters are really good, honest and real; I can’t fully imagine how difficult that must be to write.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Reilley

    This book is stunning! The science, the psychology, and the real teen experiences, coupled with Clark's witty writing are extraordinary! From the moment I opened this book, I felt a kinship with Lucille, and as she grew and changed through the story, I found myself fully invested in her future. This is an incredible ride!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nikki Barthelmess

    I was lucky enough to read an advance copy of HALF LIFE. This story is smart, compelling, and it makes you think. Lillian Clark is a master storyteller.

  30. 5 out of 5

    USOM

    (Disclaimer: I received this book from Netgalley. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) Half Life is all sorts of fun. Full of characters that you can instantly love, Lucille felt a little too close to home - all you overachievers will rejoice! At the same time, Half Life asks important questions about ethics and doing what's right. Presenting the ethics of cloning, the bonds of family, and asking what makes up the essence of ourselves, it is thoughtful. I definitely go (Disclaimer: I received this book from Netgalley. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) Half Life is all sorts of fun. Full of characters that you can instantly love, Lucille felt a little too close to home - all you overachievers will rejoice! At the same time, Half Life asks important questions about ethics and doing what's right. Presenting the ethics of cloning, the bonds of family, and asking what makes up the essence of ourselves, it is thoughtful. I definitely got all the Black Mirror vibes, but also Living With Yourself vibes too - which may be a more spot on premise comparison. Half Life is also a story about friendship and family. It's one of those books where the premise instantly hooked me, and then what unfolded was even better. Wrapped up in this contemporary setting are questions about the future and ethics. What rights do our clones have? Are we responsible for their actions? How much of us do they have? Presenting these conflicts, Half Life feels insightful without being heavy handed. All at the same time, it's incredibly endearing. It takes this basic feeling of not being enough, achieving enough, measuring enough, and just expands it. Asking us what we would do in Lucille's place if we had the option of having a clone. I mean, who hasn't thought of that same question? Lucille felt almost like a mirror of myself. Feeling like she's just barely succeeding and that people's expectations of her raise what she needs to succeed even higher. full review; https://utopia-state-of-mind.com/blog...

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.