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Poems to See by: A Comic Artist Interprets Great Poetry

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A fresh twist on 24 classic poems, these visual interpretations by comic artist Julian Peters will change the way you see the world. This stunning anthology of favorite poems visually interpreted by comic artist Julian Peters breathes new life into some of the greatest English-language poets of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. These are poems that can change the way A fresh twist on 24 classic poems, these visual interpretations by comic artist Julian Peters will change the way you see the world. This stunning anthology of favorite poems visually interpreted by comic artist Julian Peters breathes new life into some of the greatest English-language poets of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. These are poems that can change the way we see the world, and encountering them in graphic form promises to change the way we read the poems. In an age of increasingly visual communication, this format helps unlock the world of poetry and literature for a new generation of reluctant readers and visual learners. Grouping unexpected pairings of poems around themes such as family, identity, creativity, time, mortality, and nature, Poems to See By will also help young readers see themselves differently. A valuable teaching aid appropriate for middle school, high school, and college use, the collection includes favorites from the Western canon already taught in countless English classes. Includes poems by Emily Dickinson, Langston Hughes, Carl Sandburg, Maya Angelou, Seamus Heaney, e. e. cummings, Dylan Thomas, Christina Rossetti, William Wordsworth, William Ernest Henley, Robert Hayden, Edgar Allen Poe, W. H. Auden, Thomas Hardy, Percy Bysshe Shelley, John Philip Johnson, W. B. Yeats, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Elizabeth Bishop, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Tess Gallagher, Stevie Smith, and Siegfried Sassoon.


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A fresh twist on 24 classic poems, these visual interpretations by comic artist Julian Peters will change the way you see the world. This stunning anthology of favorite poems visually interpreted by comic artist Julian Peters breathes new life into some of the greatest English-language poets of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. These are poems that can change the way A fresh twist on 24 classic poems, these visual interpretations by comic artist Julian Peters will change the way you see the world. This stunning anthology of favorite poems visually interpreted by comic artist Julian Peters breathes new life into some of the greatest English-language poets of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. These are poems that can change the way we see the world, and encountering them in graphic form promises to change the way we read the poems. In an age of increasingly visual communication, this format helps unlock the world of poetry and literature for a new generation of reluctant readers and visual learners. Grouping unexpected pairings of poems around themes such as family, identity, creativity, time, mortality, and nature, Poems to See By will also help young readers see themselves differently. A valuable teaching aid appropriate for middle school, high school, and college use, the collection includes favorites from the Western canon already taught in countless English classes. Includes poems by Emily Dickinson, Langston Hughes, Carl Sandburg, Maya Angelou, Seamus Heaney, e. e. cummings, Dylan Thomas, Christina Rossetti, William Wordsworth, William Ernest Henley, Robert Hayden, Edgar Allen Poe, W. H. Auden, Thomas Hardy, Percy Bysshe Shelley, John Philip Johnson, W. B. Yeats, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Elizabeth Bishop, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Tess Gallagher, Stevie Smith, and Siegfried Sassoon.

30 review for Poems to See by: A Comic Artist Interprets Great Poetry

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    O, Art, you're so subjective. Julian Peters's rendering of twenty-four classic poems into comic panels has been interpreted as trying to provide a more accessible way in to poetry for young people. Can no one interviewing him read? He writes directly in his introduction, after mentioning how many teachers use his work in their classrooms: "I must confess, however, that my own motivations in creating these works had little to do with their potential educational uses. The truth is, I did it all for O, Art, you're so subjective. Julian Peters's rendering of twenty-four classic poems into comic panels has been interpreted as trying to provide a more accessible way in to poetry for young people. Can no one interviewing him read? He writes directly in his introduction, after mentioning how many teachers use his work in their classrooms: "I must confess, however, that my own motivations in creating these works had little to do with their potential educational uses. The truth is, I did it all for love of beauty. A beautiful poem is pretty much the most beautiful creation I can imagine." Lovely sentiment, Julian Peters, but just that: a sentiment, and one that doesn't resonate with me. A beautiful poem is a beautiful poem as light hitting Half Dome is a beautiful sight as the touch of a lover is a beautiful sensation as a...this leads nowhere and everywhere, and so, for me, did the book. As much as I love (a lot of) poetry I could never pin the beauty in this world down that way and leave out the sex and symphonies, planets and paintings and the laughter of babies not my own. And as he narrows Beauty to the Poem, he interprets the Poem in ways that I find Beautiful and Not So Beautiful and in one case, in the case of my favorite poem, Revolting. It's divided into chapters or as I would call them false dichotomies: Seeing Yourself, which contains among others Emily Dickinson's "'Hope is the Thing with Feathers'" and "Caged Bird" by Maya Angelou Seeing Others, Seeing Art, Seeing Nature, Seeing Time, Seeing Death which is when I see red. The interpretations are as unique as our own and his combination of graphic art with poetry is at times -- subjectively speaking -- remarkably synergistic and at others -- speaking subjectively -- graphic blasphemy. Following each artistic rendering is the full text on a white page, which coming as they do after the exuberant visuals makes them seem like epitaphs. I won't discuss every poem, only the ones I had the strongest reactions to. We got off to a bad start, Peters and I, because I did not resonate with his interpretation of "Hope..." at all. It looks nothing like the "Hope" I love and can recite; it's a mess. "Invictus" is black and white and intense, the determination, the anger, the outcome: it's powerful and loaded with testosterone. Sure, those are the words Hunter wrote but Peters chose to take a poem and transplant it into his own universe in which he makes no room for a woman. This one is not a literal interpretation so couldn't there have been even just one female in the cell block? Peters has shut us out in a way he didn't have to and though I do love his rendering of "Invictus" I also mind the disenfranchisement from that missed opportunity. Not asking for a rewrite (when I got to the one where he did a rewrite I lost it) but there's a place, and all those girls reading it will not see themselves in "Invictus" which is a shame. And then we're at my favorite, "Caged Bird." Painted in different styles and palettes for each panel, it's wonderful. Each panel is lovely and meaningful and marries so well with the words. I have to say despite the flaws this book is worth it for just this one poem, it's that remarkable and I wish Maya Angelous could have seen it (maybe she did). Chances are something else will resonate powerfully with you. Of the twenty-four this is my summit. And while individually they're divine, even if I could work out how to post a photo of a panel there's really no point because it's how they all work together that raises this rendering above the rest. I'd like a quilt of it so I could wrap myself in it. On to e.e. cummings's "May My Heart Always Be Open," the quality of which is about that of the worst comics in the Sunday newspaper (do they still have those?). Then Christina Rossetti's "Somewhere or Other" with its marvelous washes of color and smart wedding of panels to words. Now I shall skip most and lament Julian Peters's idea of Ezra Pounds's "In a Station by the Metro," which made me wish it had been done by Edward Gorey, whose interpretation would have delighted me as much as Peter's bored me. Wasted opportunity there. Yeats's "When You Are Old" also left me cold and somewhat annoyed, relying as it does on a beautiful black-and-white style that reduces physicality to literal comic-book beauty. She's got on eye liner and mascara. I love this poem so much and I love eye liner and mascara but that isn't what I want to see on Yeats's woman, whose transformation into old age is so demeaning as to strip her of her "pilgrim soul." Langston Hughes "Juke Box Love Song" is fun and funky, so colorful, it's how I see the poem too. Same with Seamus Heaney's "The Given Note," another of my favorites but there's something lost after the black-and-white explosion of emotion followed by the words laid out on the page like a cold, dead thing. There is in every one so I won't mention it again; it's just more glaring with these two. Two full-color interpretations one after the other: Peters's work on Tess Gallagher's "Choices" was, to my eyes, unlovely and unworthy. And next there's Dylan Thomas's "The Force that Through the Green Fuse Drives the Flower" and my senses come alive and I feel simultaneously electrified and hushed as Beauty can make one feel. A mention of how touched I was by Gerald Manley Hopkins's "Spring and Fall," black and white mixed with color, staying with the poem and bringing it to life -- and now i skip to the last three. The penultimate poem is Dickinson's "Because I Could Not Stop for Death" and oh, Peters, you chose twenty-four poems and two Dickinsons? From the universe of what you consider the most beautiful art form? And I find most of it not at all as beautiful as the poem. Yes to the black and white (but why do only men die in color?) but no to the focus on Emily DIckinson's plain face and it's so literal, too literal. Peters's you have drained it of its power having Emily standing before her empty grave appearing neither rueful nor brave, just homely. And after Emily your over-the-top melodramatic rendering of Edna St. Vincent Millay's exquisite "Conscientious Objector" with which you end the book with Edna in a chic black suit and heels with her hair done, facing a firing squad at close range. As Emily's looks detract from the message so does Edna's look: this conscientious objector could be walking down Fifth Avenue. But before those two, before Emily kindly came for death and Edna dressed up for it, there is Annabel Lee. Oh, Peters, what you have done to Annabel Lee; if she wasn't dead you'd have killed her. POE was Nabokov's favorite POEt and I love Poe and his poetry -- but no, "Annabel Lee" did not inspire "Lolita," that is myth, all but one scene of "Lolita" takes place in -- oh, forget it, that doesn't matter, you know it or you don't. I couldn't pick a favorite poet but Poe is one of my favorite writers and "Annabel Lee" is my favorite poem of his.... ...and JULIAN PETERS YOU'VE GIVEN HER PIGTAILS. PIGTAILS! AND MADE The Narrator LOOK TWELVE. What have you done, Peters? They were not a pair of middle-school children as you've drawn them and placed in them Poe's beautiful words, laying on the grass, one in pigtails holding the hand of The Narrator who clearly has not yet hit puberty and in that panel the words, "But we loved with a love that was more than love/I and my Annabel Lee." Peters I am angry, can you tell? That's a piece of my heart and with some time I better be able to unsee that young kid who couldn't possibly be The Narrator and that girl in pigtails who is not worthy of -- and suddenly once dead, for "The stars never rise, but I feel the bright eyes/Of the beautiful Annabel Lee" in THAT panel she's got the face of a grown woman! If I'm to keep this book I have to rip out those pages. That's the risk you take when you choose an ARC of iconic poetry rendered by a visual artist. The one who says, "A beautiful poem is pretty much the most beautiful creation I can imagine" and takes a favorite poem and twists and contorts it until it's just rubbish. And Peters, I can't even say "nevermore" because some of what's in your book is great and even beautiful. Pigtails??? Pfffffffft.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Anusha Narasimhan

    This book contains 25 classic poems converted into comics. I loved how the artist used different colours, panel structure and drawing style for each poem. Each comic is interpreted in a way that suits the theme of the poem. As someone new to poetry and a comic lover, I appreciated how this book illustrated lines from classic poems as comics followed by the full text of the poem. This book would be of interest to ardent poetry lovers and poetry newbies alike. Note - I received a free digital copy o This book contains 25 classic poems converted into comics. I loved how the artist used different colours, panel structure and drawing style for each poem. Each comic is interpreted in a way that suits the theme of the poem. As someone new to poetry and a comic lover, I appreciated how this book illustrated lines from classic poems as comics followed by the full text of the poem. This book would be of interest to ardent poetry lovers and poetry newbies alike. Note - I received a free digital copy of the book from the publisher. This has not influenced my review in any way.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Natalie ♡

    (Got an e-arc via netgalley in exchanges for an honest review) I never read anything like that: poetry in comic form. I think the illustrator has an interesting interpretation of the poems and this book definitely had beautiful art styles. Also, I liked that it has a good variety of themes, some were lighthearted, others dark... I’d like it more if the poems were before the comics, so we could interpret them in our head ourselfs and then see what the artist interpreted them as. As it is with poems, (Got an e-arc via netgalley in exchanges for an honest review) I never read anything like that: poetry in comic form. I think the illustrator has an interesting interpretation of the poems and this book definitely had beautiful art styles. Also, I liked that it has a good variety of themes, some were lighthearted, others dark... I’d like it more if the poems were before the comics, so we could interpret them in our head ourselfs and then see what the artist interpreted them as. As it is with poems, liked some more, others less, but my favorite was the one from Dante’s inferno

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bernie Gourley

    This anthology of twenty-four classic poems is set apart by the artwork used to convey the illustrator / anthologist’s view of each poem. The poets are all virtuosos, including: Dickinson, Angelou, Cummings, Langston Hughes, Auden, Seamus Heaney, Wordsworth, Shelley, Yeats, Poe, and Eliot. The poems are sometimes, but not always, among the most anthologized of the respective poet’s work. I would say that most poetry readers will probably find something that they haven’t read, but – even if not – This anthology of twenty-four classic poems is set apart by the artwork used to convey the illustrator / anthologist’s view of each poem. The poets are all virtuosos, including: Dickinson, Angelou, Cummings, Langston Hughes, Auden, Seamus Heaney, Wordsworth, Shelley, Yeats, Poe, and Eliot. The poems are sometimes, but not always, among the most anthologized of the respective poet’s work. I would say that most poetry readers will probably find something that they haven’t read, but – even if not – it’s worth re-reading them as you enjoy the artwork. The illustrator, Julian Peters, makes a bold decision to use the widest variety of artistic styles in an attempt to more aptly capture the tone of each poem. I recently reviewed a similar book, Chris Riddell’s “Poems to Live Your Life By,” and that book used a consistent style through out (which isn’t to say that tone and reality / surrealism didn’t change.) I’m not an artist, and don’t really have a vocabulary to describe the various artistic styles employed, but will attempt to give one some insight. There is the obvious shift between monochrome and color strips, but even within each of those categories there is great variation. Some monochrome strips were mostly gray, while others were exclusively black-and-white. Color works ranged from shocking dayglo to subdued pastels to dominant single color (e.g. blue) pics. Various poems were represented by a modern comic book style art, an old fashion comic strip approach, those which looked like paintings, those that were highly realistic, those that were surreal, those that were retro-chic, and even one [for Maya Angelou’s “Caged Bird”] that was in a quilt-like style. I enjoyed this work tremendously. Most of the poems were short works, single pagers, and the fact that I’d read possibly all of them before wasn’t a problem because these are the kind of poems that should be revisited. Only the postscript poem, Eliot’s “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” was of substantial length. I’d highly recommend this book for poetry readers, particularly those interested in are of imagery and how it’s conveyed and perceived.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Marzie

    Poems to See By is a beautifully and powerfully illustrated short anthology of poems by poets from Emily Dickinson, Maya Angelou, ee cummings, Christina Rosetti, WH Auden, Robert Hayden, Langston Hughes, and many others. The illustrations are beautiful, diverse and capture the essence of the poems selected. A longer review to come, when I receive the final galley. I received a Digital Review Copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Gizzard

    I received a copy from Netgalley. I was expecting a book geared more towards young adults. This book is so much more and is a great read for both teens and adults. While the hook says comic artist, there are many different styles of art here not necessarily art you'dsee in a comic, matching the poem's concept and the artist's interpretation. I loved seeing the artist's interpretation, the colors, the mood. If you are interested in poetry but not sure where to start, OR if you enjoy a tiny peak i I received a copy from Netgalley. I was expecting a book geared more towards young adults. This book is so much more and is a great read for both teens and adults. While the hook says comic artist, there are many different styles of art here not necessarily art you'dsee in a comic, matching the poem's concept and the artist's interpretation. I loved seeing the artist's interpretation, the colors, the mood. If you are interested in poetry but not sure where to start, OR if you enjoy a tiny peak into a contemporary artist's mind, this book is both.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Phoebe

    This past September I resolved to read more poetry, and when I did so I learned that my seven year old daughter loves poetry. Poems to See By, a book of famous poems illustrated in a graphic novel style, is a treasure I plan to enjoy with her this Lent. It turns out that poetry, with its vivid language and appeal to emotion, lends itself beautifully to a graphic novel-style interpretation. Reading poetry forces us to stop and savor the words, slowly, re-reading them and thinking about them, maki This past September I resolved to read more poetry, and when I did so I learned that my seven year old daughter loves poetry. Poems to See By, a book of famous poems illustrated in a graphic novel style, is a treasure I plan to enjoy with her this Lent. It turns out that poetry, with its vivid language and appeal to emotion, lends itself beautifully to a graphic novel-style interpretation. Reading poetry forces us to stop and savor the words, slowly, re-reading them and thinking about them, making poetry reading an excellent Lenten practice, training us to do the same when reading Scripture. Julian Peters chooses some very well known poems that we get to read again with fresh eyes through the book’s gorgeous, colorful illustrations for each line. While rereading “Those Winter Sundays” by Robert Hayden with these illustrations, I felt both the cold of winter and the pang of regret the narrator expresses when he finally recognizes “loves austere and lonely offices.” This book makes an excellent gift as well.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Zahiryn Vélez Hernández

    *I received an ARC of this book through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review* Confession time: I love classic poetry. You can often catch me quoting famous lines, gesticulating wildly with my hands. My students roll their eyes, embarrassed on my behalf, but I digress. There is something charming in the familiar, magic in re-reading known works, in studying the sentences that have endured and enamored us, and witnessing how they change: every generation comes back to the classics and “sees” t *I received an ARC of this book through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review* Confession time: I love classic poetry. You can often catch me quoting famous lines, gesticulating wildly with my hands. My students roll their eyes, embarrassed on my behalf, but I digress. There is something charming in the familiar, magic in re-reading known works, in studying the sentences that have endured and enamored us, and witnessing how they change: every generation comes back to the classics and “sees” them anew. That’s the thing about poetry, perhaps; the poet writes and decides and means, but the readers read and feel as they see fit. Readers interpret. And these interpretations can become essays and extensive analyses, but they can also become other forms of art. Maybe a song, maybe a drawing. Why not a comic? Julian Peters certainly asked himself that. “Poems to See By” is an illustrated anthology of classic poems —24, to be exact. Each poem is accompanied by the author’s visual interpretation in the often breathtaking, sometimes amusing form of a comic. As a graphic designer, this sounded like the perfect marriage of two beloved passions. Excited, I requested the collection. I wasn’t disappointed. This book is exactly what it promises to be, and more. I thought that a single artist tackling 24 poems would result on repetitive styles or obvious recurrences of motifs. Peters did neither. Overall, the breadth of variety in this book is frankly impressing. So is the use of colors and shapes, the different lines and shades. I would’ve never guessed that this was the work of a single artist; despite knowing it was, I still did a double take on more than one occasion, hurrying back to the start to verify that, yes, Peters was the only illustrator. His love for these poems, and the respect with which he approaches each drawing, is crystal clear. His reverence doesn’t stop him from imagining new meanings, and the results are much stronger for this: “As much as it’s true that a picture is worth a thousand words, it’s also the case that a single word can conjure up as many pictures as there are people who read it”. The book is divided into six sections: Seeing Yourself, Seeing Others, Seeing Art, Seeing Nature, Seeing Time, Seeing Death. The poetry selection for each, in itself, is lovely, with works from a wide variety of familiar names: Dickinson, Angelou, Cummings, Poe, Hughes, among others. Though many of the poems are extremely familiar, others are overlooked jewels of their author’s. I was happy to find some of my favorites among the selection, and I think everyone will find at least one of theirs. I wholeheartedly recommend this book to fans of poetry and visual arts. Moreover, it would be a lovely addition to every high school English classroom, and a great reference for classes that study and analyze the intersection of visual and textual art-forms. I know I will use it in my own classes. I leave you with Peters’ preface: “The truth is, I did it all for love of beauty. A beautiful poem is pretty much the most beautiful creation I can imagine… I wanted to pay tribute to the way these poems made me feel, to spend time with them, to pull them in as close to me as possible in the way that, as someone who draws comics, felt the most natural”.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tonstant Weader

    Poems to See By is an illustrated anthology of two dozen classic poems that will be familiar to many readers. They are organized into six sections that consider different ways of seeing: Seeing Yourself, Others, Art, Nature, Time, and Death. You can see examples on Julian Peters’ website, such as “Annabel Lee” by Edgar Allen Poe or “Before the Battle” by Siegfried Sassoon. The newest poem is “There Have Come Soft Rains” by John Philip Johnson while the oldest is William Wordsworth’s “The World Is Poems to See By is an illustrated anthology of two dozen classic poems that will be familiar to many readers. They are organized into six sections that consider different ways of seeing: Seeing Yourself, Others, Art, Nature, Time, and Death. You can see examples on Julian Peters’ website, such as “Annabel Lee” by Edgar Allen Poe or “Before the Battle” by Siegfried Sassoon. The newest poem is “There Have Come Soft Rains” by John Philip Johnson while the oldest is William Wordsworth’s “The World Is Too Much with Us.” Of course, it is impossible to select a perfect sampling from 220 years of poetry, but I cannot think of any that should be excluded. There are two poems from Emily Dickinson but her poems are so short that seems more than fair. Poems to See By is a great collection of poems and is beautifully illustrated. What is most impressive is the many varied styles of illustration. Peters masterfully fitted his illustrations to the emotional context of the poem. You can look at these examples and see Peters’ incredible ability to adapt his style to suit the poem. Poems to See By will be released March 31st. I received an e-galley from the publisher through NetGalley. Poems to See By at Plough Publishing Julian Peters author site https://tonstantweaderreviews.wordpre...

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Peters is a comics artist based in Montreal. Here he has chosen 24 reasonably well-known poems by the likes of e.e. cummings, Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost, Seamus Heaney, Langston Hughes, Edgar Allan Poe, Christina Rossetti and W.B. Yeats and illustrated each one in a markedly different style. From black-and-white manga to a riot of color and music, from minimalist calligraphy-like Japanese watercolor to imitations of Brueghel, there is such a variety here that at first I presumed there were mu Peters is a comics artist based in Montreal. Here he has chosen 24 reasonably well-known poems by the likes of e.e. cummings, Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost, Seamus Heaney, Langston Hughes, Edgar Allan Poe, Christina Rossetti and W.B. Yeats and illustrated each one in a markedly different style. From black-and-white manga to a riot of color and music, from minimalist calligraphy-like Japanese watercolor to imitations of Brueghel, there is such a variety here that at first I presumed there were multiple artists involved (as in one of my favorite graphic novels of last year, ABC of Typography, where the text was written by one author but each chapter had a different illustrator). Yet this is all Peters’ work; I was impressed by his versatility. The illustrations veer from realistic to abstract, with some more obviously cartoon-like. A couple of sequences reminded me of the style of Raymond Briggs. For “Caged Bird” by Maya Angelou, the lines are inlaid on the squares of a painted patchwork quilt. Other sets look to have been done via wood engraving, or with good old-fashioned Crayola crayons. You could quibble with some of the more obvious poetry selections, but I still encountered a few that were new to me, including “Buffalo Dusk” by Carl Sandburg and “Conscientious Objector” by Edna St. Vincent Millay. Peters has grouped them into six thematic categories: self, others, art, nature, time and death. I think teenagers, especially, will enjoy the introduction to a range of poets and comics styles.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Pop Bop

    This Just Blew Me Away I wasn't quite sure what I was in for when I downloaded this book. O.K., illustrated poems - I get that. Who didn't grow up with ripping action illustrations accompanying a school days classic like "...the midnight ride of Paul Revere"? I sort of expected something along those lines, and just hoped I'd like the artist's style. I was totally out of line on that. The book opens with a brief foreword/essay about how poetry and sequential comics art complement each other. The es This Just Blew Me Away I wasn't quite sure what I was in for when I downloaded this book. O.K., illustrated poems - I get that. Who didn't grow up with ripping action illustrations accompanying a school days classic like "...the midnight ride of Paul Revere"? I sort of expected something along those lines, and just hoped I'd like the artist's style. I was totally out of line on that. The book opens with a brief foreword/essay about how poetry and sequential comics art complement each other. The essay felt a bit like the author was trying too hard to justify his effort, but I'm glad I read the whole essay. It got me thinking about the relationship between the poetry and the sequential art, and it turns out that there's a good bit to think about while enjoying this book. As the author/artist suggests, consider rhythm, stress, repetition, juxtaposition, contrast, and the challenges of translation and interpretation. By the end of the book I almost felt like I owed the author/artist an apology for doubting him. I was amazed to see that for each poem Julian Peters adopted a different, distinct style and medium. Impressionistic, realistic, collage, watercolors, oils, pencils, inks - each poem is treated in a completely distinct fashion unlike anything that came before or comes after. It looks exactly as though each poem was illustrated by a different artist. And each treatment suits, complements, and enhances the poem. So, for something like "Invictus" we get a muscular, ripping, pen and ink adventure sequence. For "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings" we get just lines of colors and naif collages that suggest freedom and captivity, with the poem carefully penciled into the lines. In "Hope is the Thing With Feathers" a brightly colored bird flies through black pencil sketches of scenes of hope and despair. Hughes's "Jukebox Love Song" looks like someone sent Edward Hopper to Harlem with a box of watercolors and an order to lighten up. Wordsworth's "The World is Too Much With Us" rendered in iPhone text messages? Inspired. I could go on and on, but you get the idea. This is a playful, deadly serious, creative, marvelously accomplished book that will delight those who like their poetry with a side of Della Robbia Blue. And if you wonder how it could even be possible to present T.S. Eliot or Dylan Thomas in a comics or graphic form, well this book has those answers. A wonderful find. (Please note that I received a free advance will-self-destruct-in-x-days Adobe Digital copy of this book without a review requirement, or any influence regarding review content should I choose to post a review. Apart from that I have no connection at all to either the author or the publisher of this book.)

  12. 5 out of 5

    bet mercer

    What a fascinating idea to create a graphic "novel" of classic poems! I could see how this might draw in readers who find poetry confusing or daunting or too highbrow. It was interesting to see the illustrator choose to portray the poet in a lead role for some of the poems, even though they may not be autobiographical poems. I'd love to see more of volumes like this. I also appreciated that every poem wasn't illustrated in the same manner, but the drawings seemed to be connected to topic or voic What a fascinating idea to create a graphic "novel" of classic poems! I could see how this might draw in readers who find poetry confusing or daunting or too highbrow. It was interesting to see the illustrator choose to portray the poet in a lead role for some of the poems, even though they may not be autobiographical poems. I'd love to see more of volumes like this. I also appreciated that every poem wasn't illustrated in the same manner, but the drawings seemed to be connected to topic or voice of the individual pieces.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Hirdesh

    AMAZING ! ! ! Thanks for Netgalley & respective publishers for sending a copy. This poetry graphic books was delightful and exceptional. It comprises 24 classic poems and the comical-graphic was used that was so pure and linked which made you to feel ecstatic with poetry and scenes. I've enjoyed those verses with pictures which were so thoughtful and visionary. Highly recommended for poetry lovers. AMAZING ! ! ! Thanks for Netgalley & respective publishers for sending a copy. This poetry graphic books was delightful and exceptional. It comprises 24 classic poems and the comical-graphic was used that was so pure and linked which made you to feel ecstatic with poetry and scenes. I've enjoyed those verses with pictures which were so thoughtful and visionary. Highly recommended for poetry lovers.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    I received this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. 2020 POPSUGAR Reading Challenge: An anthology This is a great poetry anthology that covers a lot. I applaud the artist's choice of poems; there's everything from Maya Anglou to ee cummings to Langston Hughes to Carl Sandburg to Chistina Rossetti. Every poem had its own distinct art to it that mirrored the poet's background or the theme of the poem. This collection definitely gives readers a great selection of poetry and makes it I received this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. 2020 POPSUGAR Reading Challenge: An anthology This is a great poetry anthology that covers a lot. I applaud the artist's choice of poems; there's everything from Maya Anglou to ee cummings to Langston Hughes to Carl Sandburg to Chistina Rossetti. Every poem had its own distinct art to it that mirrored the poet's background or the theme of the poem. This collection definitely gives readers a great selection of poetry and makes it very accessible. However, as a teacher, I really appreciated the fact the poems were organized by genre, which makes them very easy to match with a current concept based curriculum. As mentioned before, the pairing of images to classic poetry really make the texts more accessible to all learners and all peoples. Additionally, I love the inclusion of the original poem at the end of the artist's interpretation. This book has so many applications in the classroom that I definitely recommend English teachers check it out! The reason for 4 stars instead of 5 is due to the fact that some of the artwork makes it hard to figure out the order of the lines of poetry. If you're unfamiliar with the poem, it could be very confusing at first.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    This author/artist already illustrated my very favorite poem (“The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock by T.S. Eliot,” online here). Now, he somehow managed to figure out what many of the rest of my favorite poems were and include them in this magical book. He reproduces the full texts of the poems he selected plus adds marvelous illustrations for all of them. And in fact, each illustration is sufficiently unique that it’s a wonder they are all by the same artist. Poets he selected include e.e. cummi This author/artist already illustrated my very favorite poem (“The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock by T.S. Eliot,” online here). Now, he somehow managed to figure out what many of the rest of my favorite poems were and include them in this magical book. He reproduces the full texts of the poems he selected plus adds marvelous illustrations for all of them. And in fact, each illustration is sufficiently unique that it’s a wonder they are all by the same artist. Poets he selected include e.e. cummings, William Butler Yeats, Siegfried Sasson, Seamus Heaney, Emily Dickinson, and more, adding up to 25 classic poems. Peters’ imagination is as much on display as is that of the poets, since he interprets their meaning through his illustrations. I particularly appreciated his take on “The Force That Through the Green Fuse Drives the Flower” by Dylan Thomas and “Musée des Beaux Arts” by W.H. Auden. Peters clarifies what seems abstruse; his visionary perceptions are revelatory. Evaluation: This is a book for lovers of poetry, lovers of art, and those who just appreciate remarkable talent. Highly recommended!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    This combination of graphic novel style illustrations and classic poems really worked. Highly recommended. I'd like to see a second volume

  17. 4 out of 5

    Chandra

    I love the idea of this book, poems being illustrated. However, this particular collection of poems wasn’t right for me (there were only a few I liked). I would love to see this concept done with a more diverse collection of poems/poets! I did enjoy the variety of art, especially on the few poems that I was a fan of.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    Poems to See By is a unique and beautiful collection of classic poems. I received this as an incomplete advanced digital copy so I do not know what the final form will be, but it would be a lovely book to keep on a coffee table or end table to enjoy from time to time. Many of the poems were familiar to me, but others were not. I don't read much poetry and the artwork and comic book style layout was engaging and helpful in understanding the rhythm. The artist, Julian Peters, states in the preface Poems to See By is a unique and beautiful collection of classic poems. I received this as an incomplete advanced digital copy so I do not know what the final form will be, but it would be a lovely book to keep on a coffee table or end table to enjoy from time to time. Many of the poems were familiar to me, but others were not. I don't read much poetry and the artwork and comic book style layout was engaging and helpful in understanding the rhythm. The artist, Julian Peters, states in the preface "The poetry comics included in this book set out to adapt or, it could be said, translate great poems into the visual language of comics." As a visual learner, I found the artwork a powerful aid to understand the poems. In particular, the artwork accompanying the poem Buffalo Dusk by Carl Sandburg is especially moving and impactful. I reccomend this collection to any poetry lover and to anyone who desires to develop a greater appreciation for poetry. Thank you to Netgalley and Plough Publishing for an advance reader copy in exchange for an honest review. Update: I have received a print copy of this book and it is beautiful. Definitely a great coffee table book. I enjoy flipping through it as the art work is amazing.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    The poems chosen by Julian to illustrate are interesting. Mostly American and British authors, of the 19th and 20th century. Langston Hughes and Emily Dickenson are And even though it is all done by the same illustrator, the interpretations vary widly. Even poems that I know so well, such as William Wordsworth's "The World is Too Much With Us" has a modern interpretation. And although we have the poems in our heads, it is enlightening to see how others, such as Julian, sees these, and illustrates t The poems chosen by Julian to illustrate are interesting. Mostly American and British authors, of the 19th and 20th century. Langston Hughes and Emily Dickenson are And even though it is all done by the same illustrator, the interpretations vary widly. Even poems that I know so well, such as William Wordsworth's "The World is Too Much With Us" has a modern interpretation. And although we have the poems in our heads, it is enlightening to see how others, such as Julian, sees these, and illustrates these. Breaths new life into things that thought we knew. Thanks to Netgalley for making this book available for an honest review.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    Inspired by the beauty of poetry, Julian Peters has created a wonderful collection of images depicting 24 classic works written by poets such as Emily Dickinson, William Ernest Henley, Maya Angelou, e.e. Cummings, Christina Rossetti, Robert Hayden, Langston Hughes, Seamus Heaney, Thomas Hardy, Jess Gallagher, Edgar Allan Poe, and more. Peters said, "I wanted to pay tribute to the way these poems made me feel, to spend time with them, to pull them in as close to me as possible in the way that felt Inspired by the beauty of poetry, Julian Peters has created a wonderful collection of images depicting 24 classic works written by poets such as Emily Dickinson, William Ernest Henley, Maya Angelou, e.e. Cummings, Christina Rossetti, Robert Hayden, Langston Hughes, Seamus Heaney, Thomas Hardy, Jess Gallagher, Edgar Allan Poe, and more. Peters said, "I wanted to pay tribute to the way these poems made me feel, to spend time with them, to pull them in as close to me as possible in the way that felt to me, as someone who draws comics, the most natural." I read a digital ARC and some of the poems don't have artwork yet. I love the way Peters used different styles for each poem. My favourite is Annabel Lee by Edgar Allan Poe. Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for a complimentary copy in exchange for an honest review.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Siobhán

    *I received an ARC via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Thanks for the free comic book / poetry collection.* "Poems to See by" is the graphic illustration of world famous poems by Emily Dickinson, Thomas Hardy, T.S. Eliot, Dylan Thomas and many more. We find the text embedded in the panels, it's quite beautiful. The style of the different poems is mirrored in the drawing style. Each illustrated poem is followed by the text of the poem without any drawings in order for the reader to rea *I received an ARC via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Thanks for the free comic book / poetry collection.* "Poems to See by" is the graphic illustration of world famous poems by Emily Dickinson, Thomas Hardy, T.S. Eliot, Dylan Thomas and many more. We find the text embedded in the panels, it's quite beautiful. The style of the different poems is mirrored in the drawing style. Each illustrated poem is followed by the text of the poem without any drawings in order for the reader to read the poems once more without the pictures. I personally loved the choice of poems (T.S. Eliot, Dylan Thomas, Emily Dickinson! <3) and how well the drawings fitted the poems. The pictures are, of course, a sort of interpretation of the poems, but I liked that. 5 Stars!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Stansel

    I requested this because it looked interesting. I am blown away. The poems, many I knew, some I did not, are all beautiful. But the art. Oh the art! All different styles from pen and ink, to anime to watercolor. All amazing at encompassing the feel and style of the words. The modern interpretation of Wordsworths "The World is Too Much With Us" was impactful. The use of a quilt like design for Maya Angelou's "Caged Bird" was stirring. Just wow. He has one of the poems on his website if you want a I requested this because it looked interesting. I am blown away. The poems, many I knew, some I did not, are all beautiful. But the art. Oh the art! All different styles from pen and ink, to anime to watercolor. All amazing at encompassing the feel and style of the words. The modern interpretation of Wordsworths "The World is Too Much With Us" was impactful. The use of a quilt like design for Maya Angelou's "Caged Bird" was stirring. Just wow. He has one of the poems on his website if you want a sneak peek! https://julianpeterscomics.com/annabe... Full Disclosure - I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    This collection of art and poetry is charming, emotional, and absolutely beautiful! Julian Peters' art is mesmerizing, especially when you turn page after page and realize that the art for every poem is entirely different; each is magnificent in its own right and perfectly tailored to the words and emotions in the poem. The art is so vastly different from one poem to the next: one is watercolor, the next is pencil, one is all in black and white, the next all color. It's amazing! It's hard to pic This collection of art and poetry is charming, emotional, and absolutely beautiful! Julian Peters' art is mesmerizing, especially when you turn page after page and realize that the art for every poem is entirely different; each is magnificent in its own right and perfectly tailored to the words and emotions in the poem. The art is so vastly different from one poem to the next: one is watercolor, the next is pencil, one is all in black and white, the next all color. It's amazing! It's hard to pick favorites, but mine are Somewhere Or Other and Jukebox Love Song. A fantastic collection for anyone who loves both poetry and art! *Received a copy from Edelweiss+.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sanaa Hyder

    Got this ARC on Netgalley. Julian Peters surprises and delights the senses with his incredible renditions of old poems (many of which I had never read before and was glad I hadn’t because the experience was additionally beautiful supplemented by art). His colour palette and his stylistic range are diverse and stunning. Highly recommend for anyone who loves poetry and art/graphic novels.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jeimy

    The ARC I received from the publisher was incomplete, but I appreciated the poem / illustration pairings.

  26. 5 out of 5

    J Earl

    Poems to See By: A Comic Artist Interprets Great Poetry by Julian Peters collects 24 poems along with Peters' visual interpretations. Most readers won't necessarily connect with every one, maybe even very few of them. But it is still an interesting way to understand poetry. On Edelweiss, where one of the categories is to suggest target age groups, they suggest 13-18, grades 8-12. Like any anthology, the key is going to be how it is used by the instructor, the book, any book, is not what is doing Poems to See By: A Comic Artist Interprets Great Poetry by Julian Peters collects 24 poems along with Peters' visual interpretations. Most readers won't necessarily connect with every one, maybe even very few of them. But it is still an interesting way to understand poetry. On Edelweiss, where one of the categories is to suggest target age groups, they suggest 13-18, grades 8-12. Like any anthology, the key is going to be how it is used by the instructor, the book, any book, is not what is doing the work of helping students learn, it is a dynamic between teacher, student, and any texts used. That said, the range mentioned seems about right. When I taught at university I might have considered using a couple of the poem/comic sets but I would not have assigned the book. Like any interpretation of works literature, everyone will see things a little different. Even though I was not crazy about a few of the comics, I didn't think he was untrue to the text. Or, to put it the way most of us have heard it, it can be grounded in the text itself. So I don't have a lot of complaints just because I don't read a few of the poems the same way he does. That kind of “criticism” is really a statement of entitlement, namely that such a person feels entitled to state what is and is not proper for someone to get from a text. I don't presume to be God-like nor quite that narcissistic, so I simply don't see some poems as he does. These are his interpretations, not things drawn to meet someone's particular agenda priorities. Yes, a couple things might be problematic, but if you can read a book of interpretations, comic or otherwise, and not find some things problematic, then you're either not paying attention or you're reading something that is adhering to some dogmatic manifesto so as not to offend anyone. This book would also be something that readers who don't usually feel comfortable with poetry might enjoy. The value in this work, as something to help people, is to show that there is more than one way into any work of art. Even these classics can be approached from perspectives that once would have been shunned for being too common or too masculine/feminine, or any of the other ways that people have kept others marginalized. Unfortunately, many who are marginalized feel the need to then marginalize to compensate rather than inclusively embracing and debating. I think I like the idea of this book better than the actual execution but I do still believe this volume can be enjoyable for many and used to help grow appreciation of poetry for many more. With that in mind, I do recommend this for both the ages mentioned above as well as any adult who wants to read more poetry but hesitates because of the way it may have been presented to them in school. Reviewed from a copy made available by the publisher via NetGalley.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Vidya Tiru

    My Thoughts This book includes a wonderful selection of 24 beautiful classic poems that are organized into categories of “seeing,” which include Seeing Yourself, Seeing Others, Seeing Art, Seeing Nature, Seeing Time, and Seeing Death. It includes works from a diverse set of poets: Wordsworth, Yeats, Angelou and Hughes among others. I discovered new poems by poets I enjoy reading (Thomas Hardy’s The Darkling Thrush, Poe’s Annabel Lee), favorite poems (Shelley’s Ozymandias, Emily Dickinson’s Hope), My Thoughts This book includes a wonderful selection of 24 beautiful classic poems that are organized into categories of “seeing,” which include Seeing Yourself, Seeing Others, Seeing Art, Seeing Nature, Seeing Time, and Seeing Death. It includes works from a diverse set of poets: Wordsworth, Yeats, Angelou and Hughes among others. I discovered new poems by poets I enjoy reading (Thomas Hardy’s The Darkling Thrush, Poe’s Annabel Lee), favorite poems (Shelley’s Ozymandias, Emily Dickinson’s Hope), and wonderful poets I had not read before(Seamus Heaney, Siegfried Sassoon). I started taking notes as I read each one over and over again, so I could list a couple of favorites. But I soon realized the futility of that exercise. It was just impossible – I love each one for its uniqueness – in the selection of the poem, and the wondrously suited art style as if made for the poem. We see manga, familiar comic strip styles and black-and-white film strips playfully included with whimsical watercolors, folk artsy crayons and more. It is almost impossible to believe it is all the work of a single artist (but it is!) The artist’s rendering can help readers “see” the poems in a whole new way, and also opens up ideas for more inspiration. Like Peters says, “As much as it’s true that a picture is worth a thousand words, it’s also the case that a single word can conjure up as many pictures as there are people who read it”. On a side note, I felt I would have had a different feel if the original poems were included before the artists’s interpretation. In Summary I am going to get this book for myself, and I know you will thank me if you do too – get the book for yourself and for a loved one or two who enjoys comics or poetry or reading!! Check my blog - LadyInReadWrites - for more reviews Disclaimer: Thank you to NetGalley and Edelweiss as well as the publishers for the digital ARC of the book; these are my honest opinions after reading the book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Mitchell *Kiss the Book*

    Poems to See By: A Comic Artist Interprets Great Poetry by JulianPeters, 160 pages. POETRY GRAPHIC NOVEL. Plough Publishing House, 2020. $24. 9780874863185 Language: PG (1 swear, 0 “f”); Mature Content: PG; Violence: PG BUYING ADVISORY: MS - OPTIONAL, HS - ADVISABLE AUDIENCE APPEAL: HIGH Peters takes 24 classic poems and breathes new life into them by illustrating each work in a comic-strip format. The poems cover a variety of topics, but all of them invite the reader to look at the world and themse Poems to See By: A Comic Artist Interprets Great Poetry by JulianPeters, 160 pages. POETRY GRAPHIC NOVEL. Plough Publishing House, 2020. $24. 9780874863185 Language: PG (1 swear, 0 “f”); Mature Content: PG; Violence: PG BUYING ADVISORY: MS - OPTIONAL, HS - ADVISABLE AUDIENCE APPEAL: HIGH Peters takes 24 classic poems and breathes new life into them by illustrating each work in a comic-strip format. The poems cover a variety of topics, but all of them invite the reader to look at the world and themselves differently. I was captivated from the very first poem, excited to see what amazing things Peters would continue to do with the poems he had chosen. By using illustrations to help readers visualize the poems, readers gain new perspectives to consider. My favorite thing about this book is that each unique poem also gets a unique illustration; Peters uses all different art styles throughout the book, and the variety only made me more excited to see what would come next. Reviewer: Carolina Herdegen https://kissthebook.blogspot.com/2020...

  29. 4 out of 5

    Dorothy Minor

    The description of Poems to See By interpreted by Julian Peters is described as “a fresh twist on 24 classic poems” and that “these visual interpretations by comic artist Julian Peters will change the way you see the world.” The description is accurate if somewhat understated. The visual appeal of the book should be lauded. Peters has chosen his poems well. Some of my favorites as reimagined by Peters include the following: “Hope,” “Caged Bird,” “Those Winter Sundays,” and “The World is Too Much The description of Poems to See By interpreted by Julian Peters is described as “a fresh twist on 24 classic poems” and that “these visual interpretations by comic artist Julian Peters will change the way you see the world.” The description is accurate if somewhat understated. The visual appeal of the book should be lauded. Peters has chosen his poems well. Some of my favorites as reimagined by Peters include the following: “Hope,” “Caged Bird,” “Those Winter Sundays,” and “The World is Too Much With Us.” As a comp professor, I almost always included these poems in a study of poetry. Having Peters’ book to go along with our discussions would have enhanced the discussions. Poetry discussions in a classroom can be difficult. Finding ways to show students how to relate the poetry through different lenses is valuable. Peters does that by pairing poems one might not expect to fit together except on more careful examination. Peters has created new dimensions for readers of poetry in his Poems to See By. It is a delight.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Wayne McCoy

    'Poems to See by: A Comic Artist Interprets Great Poetry' with art by Julian Peters is a collection of 24 pretty famous poems interpreted visually by the artist. Divided in to different categories of seeing, like yourself, art, death, etc., the book presents the graphic version of the poem followed by a text version only. There are some very famous poems in here by Emily Dickinson and William Wordsworth and Edgar Allan Poe, and some less familiar (to me anyway) works. All are presented in differe 'Poems to See by: A Comic Artist Interprets Great Poetry' with art by Julian Peters is a collection of 24 pretty famous poems interpreted visually by the artist. Divided in to different categories of seeing, like yourself, art, death, etc., the book presents the graphic version of the poem followed by a text version only. There are some very famous poems in here by Emily Dickinson and William Wordsworth and Edgar Allan Poe, and some less familiar (to me anyway) works. All are presented in different ways as the artist interprets. As a child, I remember there was a man who would come to our library on occasion and read us poems. We had our favorites, but this early exposure to poetry harbored a lifetime interest. I liked this collection of poems and it's approach. It shows how visually poems can be, and maybe it will help another young person to appreciate these poems and others. I received a review copy of this ebook from Plough Publishing and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this ebook.

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