kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

The Paper Girl of Paris

Availability: Ready to download

Now: Sixteen-year-old Alice is spending the summer in Paris, but she isn’t there for pastries and walks along the Seine. When her grandmother passed away two months ago, she left Alice an apartment in France that no one knew existed. An apartment that has been locked for more than seventy years. Alice is determined to find out why the apartment was abandoned and why her gran Now: Sixteen-year-old Alice is spending the summer in Paris, but she isn’t there for pastries and walks along the Seine. When her grandmother passed away two months ago, she left Alice an apartment in France that no one knew existed. An apartment that has been locked for more than seventy years. Alice is determined to find out why the apartment was abandoned and why her grandmother never once mentioned the family she left behind when she moved to America after World War II. With the help of Paul, a charming Parisian student, she sets out to uncover the truth. However, the more time she spends digging through the mysteries of the past, the more she realizes there are secrets in the present that her family is still refusing to talk about. Then: Sixteen-year-old Adalyn doesn’t recognize Paris anymore. Everywhere she looks, there are Nazis, and every day brings a new horror of life under the Occupation. When she meets Luc, the dashing and enigmatic leader of a resistance group, Adalyn feels she finally has a chance to fight back. But keeping up the appearance of being a much-admired socialite while working to undermine the Nazis is more complicated than she could have imagined. As the war goes on, Adalyn finds herself having to make more and more compromises—to her safety, to her reputation, and to her relationships with the people she loves the most.


Compare
kode adsense disini

Now: Sixteen-year-old Alice is spending the summer in Paris, but she isn’t there for pastries and walks along the Seine. When her grandmother passed away two months ago, she left Alice an apartment in France that no one knew existed. An apartment that has been locked for more than seventy years. Alice is determined to find out why the apartment was abandoned and why her gran Now: Sixteen-year-old Alice is spending the summer in Paris, but she isn’t there for pastries and walks along the Seine. When her grandmother passed away two months ago, she left Alice an apartment in France that no one knew existed. An apartment that has been locked for more than seventy years. Alice is determined to find out why the apartment was abandoned and why her grandmother never once mentioned the family she left behind when she moved to America after World War II. With the help of Paul, a charming Parisian student, she sets out to uncover the truth. However, the more time she spends digging through the mysteries of the past, the more she realizes there are secrets in the present that her family is still refusing to talk about. Then: Sixteen-year-old Adalyn doesn’t recognize Paris anymore. Everywhere she looks, there are Nazis, and every day brings a new horror of life under the Occupation. When she meets Luc, the dashing and enigmatic leader of a resistance group, Adalyn feels she finally has a chance to fight back. But keeping up the appearance of being a much-admired socialite while working to undermine the Nazis is more complicated than she could have imagined. As the war goes on, Adalyn finds herself having to make more and more compromises—to her safety, to her reputation, and to her relationships with the people she loves the most.

30 review for The Paper Girl of Paris

  1. 5 out of 5

    Zoë ☆

    This was SUCH a heavy book to read, but also super interesting! It tells the story of the people who were brave enough to resist the Germans during the Second World War, and it was honestly so impactful and eye-opening. Set in Paris, this story is about Alice who has recently lost her grandmother. And in her will, her grandmother wanted Alice to have her apartment in Paris, which up until then their family new nothing about. When they go to look in the apartment, they come to realise it hasn't be This was SUCH a heavy book to read, but also super interesting! It tells the story of the people who were brave enough to resist the Germans during the Second World War, and it was honestly so impactful and eye-opening. Set in Paris, this story is about Alice who has recently lost her grandmother. And in her will, her grandmother wanted Alice to have her apartment in Paris, which up until then their family new nothing about. When they go to look in the apartment, they come to realise it hasn't been touched since the war. But why? Since her grandmother didn't like to talk about her past, it's up to Alice herself to find out what exactly happened; why did she inherit an apartment that hasn't been touched in decades? First of all, I love everything set in Paris so that was honestly the first thing that interested me about the book. When I found out it was historical fiction set (partly) during the Second World War, I was sold. And I ended up really enjoying reading this (even though it was a hard read)! It was very interesting to find out the mystery of her grandmother along with Alice herself and it led me to have finished this book in a day. It's SO hard to imagine everything that is described from the perspective of Adalyn (Alice's great-aunt), who was in the resistance during the war. It definitely got me thinking more about the war and how hard it must have been. These people were so incredibly brave! And even though there was some drama in Alice's life throughout the book that I feel like wasn't completely necessary to tell the story, I still think this is an important read. If you like reading (YA) historical fiction or are interested in the Second World War in any way, I would highly recommend it! Thanks so much to HarperTeen for sending me an e-arc of this book 💕

  2. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Belcher

    This one is probably about a 3.5 for me but I rounded up because the ending was satisfying and improved upon some of the things I wasn't a fan of throughout the earlier parts of the book (mainly the portrayal of Alice's mother's mental health). The Paper Girl of Paris is a blend of historical fiction and a present-day narrative as Alice tries to find out more about her family, specifically her great aunt Adalyn, after she inherits her grandmother's family home in Pairs, perfectly preserved and u This one is probably about a 3.5 for me but I rounded up because the ending was satisfying and improved upon some of the things I wasn't a fan of throughout the earlier parts of the book (mainly the portrayal of Alice's mother's mental health). The Paper Girl of Paris is a blend of historical fiction and a present-day narrative as Alice tries to find out more about her family, specifically her great aunt Adalyn, after she inherits her grandmother's family home in Pairs, perfectly preserved and untouched since World War II. I was happy we get Adalyn's perspective because that was what was really gripping for me. Her narrative drives the story, coupled with the storyline of Alice trying to figure out what happened. The description of World War II, occupied Paris also felt authentic and I was interested in Adalyn and Chloe's family dynamic throughout that horrible time, as the two teens try to navigate that climate. As Adalyn becomes involved with her work (no spoilers), the stakes get much higher and I found myself enthralled and also constantly anxious for her and the others. There were some parts of the writing that felt a bit odd and as I mentioned before, there were times that the portrayal of mental health was frustrating (though the characters seem to learn and grow by the end). But overall, this was a really engaging and fast-paced read. *I received a complimentary copy of this book from HarperCollins through Edelweiss. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.*

  3. 4 out of 5

    BookNightOwl

    This story is about a girl who's grandma passes away and finds out she was left with an apartment in paris. This apartment has been locked up for over 75 years and Alice wants to know why? Alice meets Paul who begins helping Alice uncover the secrets that the apartment holds.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Alexa

    3.5 stars, but I’m comfortable rounding up for the feels this one gave me. I appreciated many aspects of this story: the multiple timelines and narratives, the Paris setting, the uncovering of a part of history I don’t know all that much about and the way it was made more personal.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Claude's Bookzone

    2.5 Stars CW: (view spoiler)[Mother suffers from depression and has attempted suicide, war crimes (hide spoiler)] This WWII story is about Alice trying to uncover the mystery of why her grandmother left her an apartment in France in her will. She has uncovered the journal of Adalyn (her great-aunt) and tries to piece together why the apartment was abandoned after the war. The story is told in alternating narrative between Alice and Adalyn. I enjoyed Adalyn's voice more as her actions drove the plo 2.5 Stars CW: (view spoiler)[Mother suffers from depression and has attempted suicide, war crimes (hide spoiler)] This WWII story is about Alice trying to uncover the mystery of why her grandmother left her an apartment in France in her will. She has uncovered the journal of Adalyn (her great-aunt) and tries to piece together why the apartment was abandoned after the war. The story is told in alternating narrative between Alice and Adalyn. I enjoyed Adalyn's voice more as her actions drove the plot forward. A couple of the characters had some mental health issues which, in my opinion, didn't seem to fit into the story. I feel like this was included in to add depth, but too me it felt superfluous as the main story-line was sufficiently engaging. That being said, I felt even this could have been fleshed out a bit and more tension added. At no point did I feel like I was on the edge of my seat as I have been in similar stories. Just an okay book for me.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Caden

    5/5 Stars! Trigger Warning for Depression I absolutely loved this book. I am a huge fan of historical fiction and historical romance, so I immediately knew that I was going to like this book from the moment I read the synopsis. However, I was not expecting to love it as much as I do. I rarely cry when I read books, and this book made me ugly cry. Jordyn Taylor's writing is simple, yet beautiful. She constructed this book so well and made characters that were flawed yet lovable. This book is so p 5/5 Stars! Trigger Warning for Depression I absolutely loved this book. I am a huge fan of historical fiction and historical romance, so I immediately knew that I was going to like this book from the moment I read the synopsis. However, I was not expecting to love it as much as I do. I rarely cry when I read books, and this book made me ugly cry. Jordyn Taylor's writing is simple, yet beautiful. She constructed this book so well and made characters that were flawed yet lovable. This book is so powerful and moving. I truly recommend picking it up, even if Historical Fiction is not usually a genre that you pick up. Thanks for reading! Caden

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ilhaam

    “Did you make it here okay? The trains ran smoothly, Luc. The trains ran smoothly.” I just sobbed half the life out of my body. This book was incredible. I will admit that in the beginning I was a little hesitant, which is why it took me so long to finish, but then when I got into it I was into it . It was a really unique experience to have Adalyn’s POV and Alice’s where they ran parallel to each other and I honestly had a really good time making all the connections. Okay wait no that’s a lie. “Did you make it here okay? The trains ran smoothly, Luc. The trains ran smoothly.” I just sobbed half the life out of my body. This book was incredible. I will admit that in the beginning I was a little hesitant, which is why it took me so long to finish, but then when I got into it I was into it . It was a really unique experience to have Adalyn’s POV and Alice’s where they ran parallel to each other and I honestly had a really good time making all the connections. Okay wait no that’s a lie. Most of the connections made me cry so much that I couldn’t carry on reading but it’s fine I’m fine. Adalyn was such a good character. Her character development, her growth, her strength. Her everything. It was nerve wrecking to read her chapters and if you read this book you’ll know exactly what I mean. She broke my heart. Her and Luc. They made me cry and cry and cry. And so many of the things she said were so relevant regarding what’s happening in the world at the moment that it hurt 100 times more to read about the victims of such cruelty. I definitely recommend this especially if you’re ready to get your heart broken. (If you haven’t read the book now is your last chance to exit this review because major spoilers are incoming) Alices parts were quite frustrating for me. There was just something about her that was annoying me, but in the end when she showed her mom the proper attention she needed I understood her. And Luc. Gosh, when she met him I was losing my mind. Let’s talk for a second about how I cried for the last 30% of the book. So yeah, I did kind of expect some of them to maybe get hurt, and after Arnauld (who made me cry so much I can’t even explain) I wasn’t expecting more of them to die. BUT THEN the author casually mentions that the photographer went to a freaking camp and died there. And I cried some more. And then Adalyn with the German soldier and I cried. And then Adalyn and Luc and I could feel the tragedy and I carried on crying. And then May 31st happened and I sobbed. The trains ran smoothly. WHO EVEN GAVE THE AUTHOR THE PERMISSION TO BREAK MY HEART LIKE THAT. it hurt so so so much to read that this book instantly became one of my favourites ever. Like ever. So, again, I definitely recommend this especially if you’re ready to get your heart broken. Thank you to Harper Collins for the ARC! 🤍

  8. 5 out of 5

    Vee_Bookish // diversifying my shelf

    Happy release day! I'm a day late. This is my most anticipated book for May.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey (Bring My Books)

    This is a title where the topic of intended audience is so important - as an adult reader, I found myself unable to really get into the story, but I think as a younger reader I would have loved this. It gives a lot for a reader to research and discover, and the journey that Alice and her new Parisian friend take to find out more about her grandmother was really interesting. In a perfect world, I would have loved to have way more of the past storyline, because I think that's where this book reall This is a title where the topic of intended audience is so important - as an adult reader, I found myself unable to really get into the story, but I think as a younger reader I would have loved this. It gives a lot for a reader to research and discover, and the journey that Alice and her new Parisian friend take to find out more about her grandmother was really interesting. In a perfect world, I would have loved to have way more of the past storyline, because I think that's where this book really stood out. My biggest frustrations were how little of present day Grandma we were given - I understand that her not being around was basically what created the story and drove the plot - but there is so much that doesn't make sense about her actions after the war and prior to her death. I was also frustrated with how the mental health aspects of the book were handled - those portions seemed as if they were written with a much, much younger audience in mind. Thank you to NetGalley, HarperTeen, & HarperCollins for the opportunity to read and review this book before it's publication date! This in no way affected my review, opinions are my own.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Shannon (It Starts At Midnight)

    You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight This was such a sweet, inspiring story! It starts with a young woman inheriting her grandmother's apartment (and apparently, her secrets!) in Paris, and weaves through an incredible tale about standing up against an oppressive regime (1940s) and finding out who you are, where you came from, and just generally speaking up for yourself (present).  Alice's story is sweet, and I enjoyed watch You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight This was such a sweet, inspiring story! It starts with a young woman inheriting her grandmother's apartment (and apparently, her secrets!) in Paris, and weaves through an incredible tale about standing up against an oppressive regime (1940s) and finding out who you are, where you came from, and just generally speaking up for yourself (present).  Alice's story is sweet, and I enjoyed watching her sleuth all over Paris with a very lovely Parisian fellow. I also really liked how the author delved into her family life a bit, and how that was clearly a focus of the story overall. I didn't connect totally to Alice, but I enjoyed her nonetheless.  For me, the absolute bread and butter of this story was Adalyn's perspective. She's incredibly privileged and knows it, but uses it for good during the Nazi invasion of France. Without giving too much away, Adalyn refuses to just sit around while people are tortured and killed, but of course it must be kept a secret. And now, many years later, it's up to Alice to unravel this history of secrets.  I really don't want to say much else, because I fear it'll ruin the story which would be a shame. But it is absolutely one worth reading, as you'll no doubt be inspired by Adalyn's story, and probably wish you were Alice having coffee and being a detective in adorable Parisian cafes.   Bottom Line: A lovely story about families, secrets, and standing up for what's right no matter the cost. 

  11. 4 out of 5

    Deb (Readerbuzz) Nance

    Alice and her parents are in Paris. Alice's grandmother has passed away, and she has left an apartment in Paris to Alice. The apartment has been abandoned since WWII. Why? And why did her grandmother never speak of the apartment or her life before she came to live in America? Alice discovers photos in the apartment and learns that her grandmother had a sister, Adalyn, who was never mentioned. The story alternates between the present time and the time of the Nazi occupation in France, between Alic Alice and her parents are in Paris. Alice's grandmother has passed away, and she has left an apartment in Paris to Alice. The apartment has been abandoned since WWII. Why? And why did her grandmother never speak of the apartment or her life before she came to live in America? Alice discovers photos in the apartment and learns that her grandmother had a sister, Adalyn, who was never mentioned. The story alternates between the present time and the time of the Nazi occupation in France, between Alice's investigation of her aunt's role in the war and Adalyn's struggles during the occupation. The events of the two stories are carefully plotted out, and the terrible events of the war are shared in a way that retains the horror of the events but sanitizes the events for younger readers.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Raji

    Find this review and more on my blog at Worlds Unlike Our Own . 3.5 stars Thank you to the publisher, HarperTeen, and Edelweiss for providing me with an eARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. Sixteen year old Alice Prewitt has just inherited an apartment in Paris from her grandmother that no one in the family has ever heard about before. She finds an apartment perfectly preserved in time, untouched since the years of World War II, but more interesting are some old photos and the dia Find this review and more on my blog at Worlds Unlike Our Own . 3.5 stars Thank you to the publisher, HarperTeen, and Edelweiss for providing me with an eARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. Sixteen year old Alice Prewitt has just inherited an apartment in Paris from her grandmother that no one in the family has ever heard about before. She finds an apartment perfectly preserved in time, untouched since the years of World War II, but more interesting are some old photos and the diary of her great-aunt Adalyn, whom no one knew existed, which set her off on a quest to uncover long buried family secrets. The Paper Girl of Paris is narrated in both present and past. On one hand, we follow Alice as she deciphers Adalyn’s diary and retraces her life in Nazi occupied France and on the other, we see the events through Adalyn’s own eyes as she gets involved with the Resistance and takes on dangerous missions to fight against the Nazis, all the while struggling with keeping things a secret from her parents and especially her sister. I loved how immersive the storytelling was and the descriptions of France in the 1940s and the French Resistance make you feel like you’re really there. This particular side of WWII is one I have only begun to explore in historical fiction, and the author did a fantastic job giving us a deeper understanding of the state of things in Paris during this time and how ordinary people rose up to fight in their own ways. However, I can’t really say the same for the present day chapters. Although Alice’s POVs were nice enough to read, I feel that diary entries apart, this story could have been told to far better effect through Adalyn’s POV alone as that is where the real excitement is. Besides, while Alice is not an uninteresting character, I just found it hard to connect to her present day struggles in contrast to the sufferings of Occupied France. The portrayal of mental health was also quite frustrating. Though I am hardly any kind of expert, I thought the subject was taken too lightly and ended up being a hanging plot point that didn’t really ever tie into the main story – not to mention, we never do learn exactly what issues Alice’s mom had with her mother. I’ve been reading a lot of World War II stories lately and they’re always hard to get through due to how heavy the content is, but I have to say that this was the easiest of the lot. The narration is somewhat balanced by the air of mystery and adventure still hanging over the entire tale and this would probably be a good choice for someone starting out on this particular time period in historical fiction or even younger YA readers. This is the first time I’ve come across a historical fiction narrated from a present day POV and I would definitely recommend this unique, beautifully written, fast-paced novel that can easily be read in one sitting!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Nicole N. (A Myriad of Books)

    Actual rating: 3.5 stars Content warnings: PTSD, depression, anti-Semitism I saw this book come up randomly on my Twitter, and I was instantly intrigued by the synopsis and the cover. I wasn't quite sure where this book was going to take me, but it's a wonderful historical fiction novel that centers around a young French women who works for a resistance group in Nazi-occupied Germany and her great-niece 70 years later. The author's writing style is simple, but the story weaved throughout the wo Actual rating: 3.5 stars Content warnings: PTSD, depression, anti-Semitism I saw this book come up randomly on my Twitter, and I was instantly intrigued by the synopsis and the cover. I wasn't quite sure where this book was going to take me, but it's a wonderful historical fiction novel that centers around a young French women who works for a resistance group in Nazi-occupied Germany and her great-niece 70 years later. The author's writing style is simple, but the story weaved throughout the words really makes you wonder how people managed back then. The author doesn't shy away from how difficult life was, even for one of our main characters, Adalyn, who is described as a socialite and it's very obvious her family has money. So when we see Adalyn engage in dangerous "missions" as the book progresses, you really wonder, again, how brave many people like her were during this time period. I think you have suspend disbelief for a lot of the chapters from Alice's POV, and I only say that because it doesn't seem like Alice's parents care very much that their daughter is gone for hours on end in Paris, while they're at home. Maybe I'm projecting here, but I would be afraid for my teenager daughter to wonder such a large city alone for hours, especially since Alice isn't being wholly truthful to her parents in order to keep her mother's feelings at bay. As for Alice's mother, I was truly concerned for her throughout the book, and it was very obvious that when Alice described her mother's "phases" that her mother was going through something very real and difficult. We eventually see that Alice doesn't know the entire truth about her mother's condition. I'm forgiving some of Alice's actions (shouting/yellow when confronting her parents) as being a teenager. I really enjoyed following Adalyn through her diary entries and also in real time from her chapters. Her family seems like a fairly close-knit one, even with her father's mental illness, and we see how painful it is for Adalyn especially in her relationship with her younger sister, Chloe. I think there also needs to be some suspended disbelief here (or maybe just the time period?) in what Adalyn tells her parents. She does have to lie to them a lot once she is fully engrossed in the resistance group. I also felt like there were some parts not fully explained--almost brushed over--toward the ending of the book regarding the fate of Adalyn and what her family did as German occupation drew to a close in France. Overall, this was an enjoyable read. I'm not sure I would add it to my personal library as I wasn't wholly enamored with it. I forget how much I enjoy these present/past books with interweaving families until I read a book like this.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jacquie

    I feel like I’ve read a lot of books that have caught me off guard lately and this is one of them. This book was wonderfully written and the stories inside our heart wrenching! If you like to learn about various aspect of WWII through historical fiction this book is a must. The split POVs between the past (1940’s) and the present day was fascinating. I also enjoyed the fact that the author tackled mental health in this book in such a healthy and helpful way. If you liked Lovely War this is defini I feel like I’ve read a lot of books that have caught me off guard lately and this is one of them. This book was wonderfully written and the stories inside our heart wrenching! If you like to learn about various aspect of WWII through historical fiction this book is a must. The split POVs between the past (1940’s) and the present day was fascinating. I also enjoyed the fact that the author tackled mental health in this book in such a healthy and helpful way. If you liked Lovely War this is definitely a book I would encourage checking out. It has a similar feel but is totally unique and will break your heart and repair it by the end.

  15. 4 out of 5

    The Candid Cover (Olivia & Lori)

    Full Review on The Candid Cover 3.5 Stars The Paper Girl of Paris by Jordyn Taylor is set in Paris during World War II and follows both a member of a resistance group and a girl in the present day who discovers her diary. The historical elements of the book are very well done, and I learned a lot about women in the resistance. However, I didn’t think that the modern storyline was as necessary, and I found the main character’s drama takes away from the emotions of the narration in the past. This boo Full Review on The Candid Cover 3.5 Stars The Paper Girl of Paris by Jordyn Taylor is set in Paris during World War II and follows both a member of a resistance group and a girl in the present day who discovers her diary. The historical elements of the book are very well done, and I learned a lot about women in the resistance. However, I didn’t think that the modern storyline was as necessary, and I found the main character’s drama takes away from the emotions of the narration in the past. This book tells the story of a girl who stays in Paris after inheriting an apartment from her grandmother. The apartment is in perfect condition despite being abandoned decades ago, and Alice discovers her great aunt’s diary which leads her on a path to discovering what happened in the past. I loved how she is interested in learning more about her family history, and I enjoyed learning about the resistance in occupied France. This book is a historical novel, but I think it is very accessible to those who don’t typically read this genre. ❀ ADALYN’S CHARACTER IS INTERESTING I especially enjoyed Adalyn’s perspective since it takes place during the war and follows her activity in the resistance. I find it interesting reading about women in the war, and this book contains strong female characters who play crucial roles in the resistance. Adalyn spies on Germans while pretending to socialize with them at parties, but she has to make sacrifices to do so. Her story has so much tension, and the stakes are high. I learned a lot through Adalyn, including information about the Zazous, which is a movement I was unfamiliar with. ❀ MULTI-GENERATIONAL The multi-generational aspect of the book is intriguing, but to me, it doesn’t really work out. I didn’t think Alice’s story in the modern day was as significant since her role is to figure out what happened in the past. At the same time as she is piecing together the events of the war, the reader is already watching them happen. To me, all Alice’s drama takes away from the wright of the book, and I found her voice to be childish. I also don’t think the portrayal of mental health in her timeline was as strong as it could have been. Adalyn’s story was much more powerful than Alice’s, and I feel like the book would have been better without the interruptions. ❀ A POWERFUL STORY The Paper Girl of Paris is a powerful story about family history and the resistance of occupied France. I loved reading about the work Adalyn does to fight back, but Alice’s perspective in the modern day was not as impactful. However, if you are a fan of books across multiple timelines, this one may still appeal to you.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Russell Taylor

    Loved this book, felt so real and super interesting to see into the minds of people living in Nazi occupied France. So good, I miss all the characters!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lizette

    ✨Review ✨ 📖 The Paper Girl of Paris By Jordyn Taylor On sale: May 26,2020 Advanced copy provided by publisher in exchange for muy honest review which follows. ✨ In a word: Enticing ✨ What phenomenal storytelling! ✨ 🎁🎁🎁The Paper Girl of Paris is definitely suitable as a gift to YA readers of all types . Such immersive storytelling takes you from present day to 1940's occupied France, taking part of the French Resistance. Putting this book down was tough but when I did I could almost smell fresh croissoints ✨Review ✨ 📖 The Paper Girl of Paris By Jordyn Taylor On sale: May 26,2020 Advanced copy provided by publisher in exchange for muy honest review which follows. ✨ In a word: Enticing ✨ What phenomenal storytelling! ✨ 🎁🎁🎁The Paper Girl of Paris is definitely suitable as a gift to YA readers of all types . Such immersive storytelling takes you from present day to 1940's occupied France, taking part of the French Resistance. Putting this book down was tough but when I did I could almost smell fresh croissoints and luscious chocolates. Put this on your summer reading list! The unforseen pivots in the story will captivate you . This was a well crafted nostaglic and modern read by debut author Jordan Taylor. Go pre-order your copy now! 📚Book Summary: Sixteen year old Alice is in Paris for most of the summer with her family to figure out what to do with the Paris apartment she just inherited from her grandmother. Alice starts investigating why her French Grandmother kept this apartment a secret from everyone when she discovers her great aunt Adylyn's diary from the 1940's (shortly before grandma left France for the US) in the pristine apartment. Adylyn's diary sends Alice on a journey through Nazi occupied France to discover lost secrets. Merged review: Review The Paper Girl of Paris By Jordyn Taylor In a word: Enticing! What phenomenal storytelling! The Paper Girl of Paris is definitely suitable as a gift to YA readers of all types. Such immersive storytelling takes you from present day to 1940's occupied France, taking part of the French Resistance. Putting this book down was tough but when I did I could almost smell fresh croissoints and luscious chocolates. Put this on your summer reading list! Pre-order from www.jordynhtaylor.com. The unforseen pivots in the story will captivate you . This was a well crafted nostaglic and modern read by debut author Jordyn Taylor. Book Summary: Sixteen year old Alice is in Paris for most of the summer with her family to figure out what to do with the Paris apartment she just inherited from her grandmother. Alice starts investigating why her French Grandmother kept this apartment a secret from everyone when she discovers her grandmother's sister's diary from the 1940's shortly before grandma left France for the US. Adylyn's diary sends Alice on a quest through Nazi occupied France to discover the secrets behind this straight out of pre-war France apartment. There are more secrets

  18. 5 out of 5

    Amanda (MetalPhantasmReads)

    **Audible audio book** *Slight spoilers* This book had potential of being an emotional historical fiction about a girl finding out more about her grandmother's family after the grandmother passes away. But this lacked emotional punch, tension in some scenes and also really glossed over a darker topic involving the protagonist's mother. The WWII chapters had some good moments of seeing the anger that Chloe (the grandmother) had towards the Nazi's and how she hates that her family doesn't seem to be **Audible audio book** *Slight spoilers* This book had potential of being an emotional historical fiction about a girl finding out more about her grandmother's family after the grandmother passes away. But this lacked emotional punch, tension in some scenes and also really glossed over a darker topic involving the protagonist's mother. The WWII chapters had some good moments of seeing the anger that Chloe (the grandmother) had towards the Nazi's and how she hates that her family doesn't seem to be bothered by the Germans. Also, Adalyn was brave in being a spy and doing what she could during the war. This had more potential though to dig more into the nature of being a spy. I felt like we only get the surface of how she hated the Germans, spied them and also didn't tell her family about it. But everything is so easy for this resistance group! I doubt that resistance groups in those days had everything go smoothly, although that is something I'm not versed in. Also, Adalyn felt a bit flat as character. I would preferred having the grandmother's POV when she was young to see what she thought of the whole thing. I feel like you don't completely understand why the grandmother left her childhood apartment to her granddaughter before she passed. The grandmother was so mad at her family with how, in her opinion, they didn't take the war as serious as she did as a teen. This contention wasn't fully utilized and it would've made for more entertaining content. Then, with Alice, our modern protagonist, she's reading her great aunt's diary (Adalyn) and trying to figure out what happened to the family she never knew. Plus, Alice's mom clearly is struggling and has had some dark issue for a long time. Let's touch on this. The fact that Alice is NEVER approached by her parents, especially her dad and told what is wrong with her mom. Alice is kept in the dark by her parents which is NOT how you treat your child. I've known many friends in real life whose parents struggle with different issues but my friends were not kept in the dark as kids. The fact that this protagonist is so clueless with her mother's problem really bothered me. Plus, the book only tackles this subject AT THE END of the story. She has to confront her parents on what's going on with her mother to understand, let alone know what's wrong. I have no idea this was a thing. Plus, even though Alice is reading Adalyn's diary, which accounts her SPYING against the Germans, Alice keeps thinking she's a Nazi sympathizer. Ummm...is she that dumb? It takes someone telling her the truth and THEN Alice realizes that her great aunt was a spy, when she was reading the freaking diary! This felt like an inconsistency that wasn't fixed. Adalyn's dairy clearly states the things she went through to become involved with the resistance and what she was apart of. This was annoying and really made my enjoyment plummet. This book had a good beginning with all the stuff they find in the apartment and the quest to find out more about family you never knew. But this book gets easily distracted with having a romance between Alice and a French boy in modern times and that kinda takes over the historical part. Alice doesn't seem quite as motivated sometimes to find out the truth; she's too distracted by this cute boy. Plus, the historical events barely scratch the surface with the suffering of Parisians during the Nazi occupation and other darker subjects that aren't explored. I've read some much better YA historical fiction that dive deeper into the darker side of the war and have much more emotional punch than this one. The narrators were good but this book really disappointed me with how the family situation was left to be quickly dealt with at the end, uneven pacing, a forced romance that started to distract the historical plot, a few annoying conveniences and the inconsistency that I mentioned. Sadly, a major disappointment and one that I don't completely recommend. I'll be returning the audio book...

  19. 5 out of 5

    Alex Baugh

    In this novel told in alternating voices, one in the present, one is the past, the lives of two teenage girls have interesting parallels. No one was more surprised than 16-year-old New Jersey native Alice Prewitt to discover she had inherited an apartment in Paris' 9th Arrondissement from her beloved Gram, Chloe. Surprised because it is an apartment that had oddly never ever been mentioned, not to Alice, nor to Gram's daughter, Alice's mother. And it's not just any apartment, as Alice, her mom a In this novel told in alternating voices, one in the present, one is the past, the lives of two teenage girls have interesting parallels. No one was more surprised than 16-year-old New Jersey native Alice Prewitt to discover she had inherited an apartment in Paris' 9th Arrondissement from her beloved Gram, Chloe. Surprised because it is an apartment that had oddly never ever been mentioned, not to Alice, nor to Gram's daughter, Alice's mother. And it's not just any apartment, as Alice, her mom and dad discover, but what turns out to be a virtual time capsule of her Gram's family from the 1930s and 1940s. And the surprises don't stop there. Going through some old photos in the apartment, Alice discovers that her Gram also had a sister named Adalyn Bonhomme that no one knew about. But why had Gram never mentioned a sister or the at-one-time-so-elegant apartment? Returning to the apartment a few days later to do more exploring, Alice is excited to find Adalyn's diary which she had begun on May 30, 1940. Writing about the Nazi occupation of France, Adalyn sounds ready to resist however she can. But when Alice finds some magazine clippings with happy pictures of Adalyn dressed in high fashion and partying and a newspaper photo to her sitting in an expensive restaurant with six men wearing Nazi armbands, she finds her discoveries hard to process. Could Adalyn have been a Nazi collaborator? Yet, the deeper Alice digs into the lives of the Bonhomme family during the war, the clearer a picture of a dysfunctional family emerges. Adalyn and Chloe's father is a WWI veteran who suffers from PTSD, has basically withdrawn from life, and everyone must tiptoe around him so as not to upset him. Their mother is the image of privilege, buying costly rationed items on the black market, and attending society parties. The two sisters are very close, but as Adalyn's wartime resistance activities increase, she worries that Chloe's outspokenness and her distain for the Nazis will jeopardize the family. Meanwhile, she finds herself very attracted to Luc who is the leader of her resistance group, and who doesn't seem to feel the same attraction for Adalyn. Alice's family is just as dysfunctional. The family tiptoes around Alice's mother's depression. It's understandable that she would be depressed after just losing her mother, and then discovering the Paris apartment was left to her daughter instead of her, but it's also clear she has been depressed off and on Alice's whole life. I thought her father was kind of passive, content to wait out his wife's depressions, not wanting to upset her and waiting for her to ask for help, which she never does. As Alice says her "family's first language is small talk" so important issues are never addressed. Sadly, he doesn't seem to see what this is doing to Alice. Alice retreats to a cafe to do her family research,where she meets her love interest Paul, a student and aspiring artist. I really wanted to like The Paper Girl of Paris more than I did. But I felt there was just too much going on and it began to feel chaotic. I would have loved a story about Adalyn, her family and her resistance work. I really liked all of the historical elements in Adalyn's part of the story and how the diary gives a nice picture of life, which is then expanded in Adalyn's own narration. I think that these two things easily could have been presented without Alice's intervention. So I'm sorry to say that I could have lived without Alice's story all together. She just wasn't as compelling a character as Adalyn. I thing Alice's story would make a nice novel about a contemporary girl dealing with a passive father and depressed mother. Her character turns the book into something of a mystery that needs solving, but it could have just as easily unfolded with that. I just felt that in The Paper Girl of Paris, she added nothing beyond being a plot device to get to Adalyn's more interesting story and her narration felt intrusive. Should you read The Paper Girl of Paris? Yes, if you like historical fiction wrapped in a mystery. This book is recommended for readers age 13+ This book was borrowed from the Queens Public Library

  20. 5 out of 5

    Genie in a Novel

    *Reaction right after finishing: 5 stars doesn't do this book justice, it's THAT good! This was a fantastic book to read that left me with that empty feeling inside after finishing it because it was just that good! The book is set in Paris, in two different timelines. First we follow present-day Paris with Alice, who has recently lost her grandmother and inherited an apartment in Paris that her parents never knew about. When they go to check out this mystery apartment, Alice finds a diary that bel *Reaction right after finishing: 5 stars doesn't do this book justice, it's THAT good! This was a fantastic book to read that left me with that empty feeling inside after finishing it because it was just that good! The book is set in Paris, in two different timelines. First we follow present-day Paris with Alice, who has recently lost her grandmother and inherited an apartment in Paris that her parents never knew about. When they go to check out this mystery apartment, Alice finds a diary that belonged to her great-aunt Adalyn. Only she never knew she had a great-aunt, and this diary reveals yet another part of her family’s past that she never knew about. After finding a photo that sparks even more questions, Alice is determined to figure out what happened in the past and what caused her grandmother to run away from it. That’s where the timelines changes, and we follow Adalyn’s story in Paris during World War II. She and her sister are angry at the German occupation of France, and want to do what they can to resist. When Adalyn stumbles across a boy her age who’s defacing German posters, she finds herself deep in a ring of resistance; so deep, in fact, that she can’t even tell her family as to not put them in any danger. What she doesn’t know is that her involvement in this group could ruin the very relationships she treasures the most. Normally, I don’t find interest in historical fiction. Sometimes it’s just too hard to read or I find that I can’t relate to it. However, as this book tells a parallel story of two timelines, it was interesting to read Adalyn’s story, while then going back to Alice trying to figure out what happened. The book was a heavy read during the references to what happened in the war – concentration camps, families being torn apart, etc. And the last 40 pages of the book or so left me wanting to cry for reasons I won’t reveal because they’ll spoil the story. I enjoyed both stories of Alice and Adalyn, along with the people they met along the way. Their families both had their issues, but you can see how the girls each love their families enough to do something for them. In Alice’s case, it’s getting her mom to do something about her depression aside from ignoring her “dark spells” and in Adalyn’s case, it’s fighting to undermine the Germans while trying to keep her family safe. The people that each girl meets along the way – Paul, Vivi, Luc, Pierre-Henri, Arnaud, and Marcel – are a great bunch of characters and just added enough to the story to make my heart full and sad at the same time. The fact that this story was set in Paris was a main reason I picked it up, to be completely honest, as it’s on my bucket list of places to visit someday. I love just about every book I read that’s set there and this book was no exception. I absolutely loved it and if you’re a fan of Paris and/or historical fiction (set in WW II), then I’m sure you’ll love this book as well!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Fiction Addition Angela

    Sixteen year old Alice is visiting Paris with her family during the summer holidays. She has recently lost her Grandmother who has left her an apartment in Paris in her will. But why has the apartment been a secret from everyone? Why has it been left untouched all that time? ..... Alice discovers her Great Aunts diary from 1940 just before her Grandmother left for the USA. Will this tell her why? The diary sends Alice on a journey, a sad Nazi riddled journey of bravery and loss. This is a lovely Sixteen year old Alice is visiting Paris with her family during the summer holidays. She has recently lost her Grandmother who has left her an apartment in Paris in her will. But why has the apartment been a secret from everyone? Why has it been left untouched all that time? ..... Alice discovers her Great Aunts diary from 1940 just before her Grandmother left for the USA. Will this tell her why? The diary sends Alice on a journey, a sad Nazi riddled journey of bravery and loss. This is a lovely historical fiction set in Paris giving us a glimpse into occupied France and the French Resistance during WWII. Narrated between the past and the present lots of suspense and a little romance. This story actually covers a period of four years 1940-1944 and how everyone’s lives are affected by the occupation. Soldiers are everywhere, rationing is in place and women are publicly castigated for having “friendships” with Germans. Adalyn and Chloes life is put on hold as they know it and they both struggle day to day with the challenges. Chloe joins the Zazou movement whilst Adalyn meets boys her age who are connected to the resistance and she eventually is sent to spy on Germans pretending to socialize with them in exchange for information that will be useful. I became invested in the characters and found it hard to put down. I was literally transported to Occupied France and the bravery of the many resistance members. Well done Jordan Taylor on your debut novel. I will be watching out for your future publications. Thanks in advance Edelweiss books.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Madelyn

    Oh my goodness gracious!! This book has become one of my favorites all time. It kept me longing for more of the story. The historical aspect, the dual perspectives, and to the beautiful setting of Paris really made this book fantastic. I loved both the girls narrating. Alice and Adalyn were both so determined about what they believed in, but did care about other’s well being. Both of their struggles that they had to resolve were very different, but the author wove them together so wonderfully! Al Oh my goodness gracious!! This book has become one of my favorites all time. It kept me longing for more of the story. The historical aspect, the dual perspectives, and to the beautiful setting of Paris really made this book fantastic. I loved both the girls narrating. Alice and Adalyn were both so determined about what they believed in, but did care about other’s well being. Both of their struggles that they had to resolve were very different, but the author wove them together so wonderfully! Alice’s relationship with Paul and Adalyn’s relationship with Luc, made me smile because they both experienced the feeling of young love and it was so adorable! Following both of their stories were so interesting as I could see what was happening behind the scenes and I just loved seeing Alice decoding Adalyn’s story! The ending was hard to bare, I didn’t see any of it coming. It happened, (you know what I’m talking about if you have read it), so quickly and I was taken aback and I had to put down the book and just contemplate. It really made me feel something! The last page wrapped it up perfectly and made this book settle in my heart! I am very surprised more people aren’t talking about this! Everyone needs to read this story! I absolutely adored everything about this book and it is something I will think about for awhile. It’ll stick with me. Please please please read this novel!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mel (Daily Prophecy)

    This was a really good book that features two different main characters in two different time lines. We have Alice, who is searching for answers about her mysterious grand-aunt Adalyn. Her grandmother Chloe left her an apartment in Paris and when she finds Adalyn’s diary she needs to find out what happened. Then there is Adalyn, the close sister of Chloe, who lives a double life in World War 2 that tears the bond between the two girls. There is always something heartbreaking about stories with ch This was a really good book that features two different main characters in two different time lines. We have Alice, who is searching for answers about her mysterious grand-aunt Adalyn. Her grandmother Chloe left her an apartment in Paris and when she finds Adalyn’s diary she needs to find out what happened. Then there is Adalyn, the close sister of Chloe, who lives a double life in World War 2 that tears the bond between the two girls. There is always something heartbreaking about stories with characters that are misunderstood. It was sad to read about the destruction of Chloe’s and Adalyn’s bond (view spoiler)[ because Chloe doesn’t know Adalyn is acting as a spy for the good side (hide spoiler)] I liked Alice and Paul was cute too, although their romance felt a bit too forced and fast for my taste. It would have been good if the two of them were just friends, because I was so wrapped up in Adalyn’s story of bravery and her blossoming romance, that I sometimes wanted to skip forward. I can’t say too much about the portrayal of mental health, because I am not familiar with it, but this aspect felt a little iffy at times. It didn’t feel right all the time, but like I said, I don’t think I am the right person to judge about it. Overall, a story filled with emotions.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Talia

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. 4.5* Such a beautiful and emotional story! It was fascinating to learn more about French resistance fighters, as it provided a new perspective of WW2 that is not commonly told. It was so engaging to have the two perspectives told, as it showed the impact of the actions of Adelines and the other resistance fighters in the present day. I did find it a little confusing at one point because I thought that Adalyn's perspective was told completely through her diary entries, which left me confused when A 4.5* Such a beautiful and emotional story! It was fascinating to learn more about French resistance fighters, as it provided a new perspective of WW2 that is not commonly told. It was so engaging to have the two perspectives told, as it showed the impact of the actions of Adelines and the other resistance fighters in the present day. I did find it a little confusing at one point because I thought that Adalyn's perspective was told completely through her diary entries, which left me confused when Alice didn't know about key details in Adalyn's story. This could have just been a result of listening to the audiobook, and not picking up on chapter titles that would have been present in a physical copy. Additionally, I also found Alice a bit immature at times, for example how she didn't realize her mom was struggling with depression, but her immaturity might have just been exaggerated in contrast to the heavier themes throughout this book. Overall, this book was deeply compelling and moving. The end was beautifully wrapped up, maybe slightly unrealistic, but nonetheless, a very beautiful ending to a very beautiful book.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

    A few months before Alice’s half of the book takes place, Alice’s grandmother passes away and leaves Alice an abandoned apartment in Paris that hasn’t been touched in over seventy years. Like any curious person who’s been left with something strange from a family member’s will, Alice and her parents decide to spend the summer in Paris. While her parents spend most of the time in their Airbnb, Alice discovers the diary of her grandmother’s sister, Adalyn Bonhomme, and embarks on a quest to learn A few months before Alice’s half of the book takes place, Alice’s grandmother passes away and leaves Alice an abandoned apartment in Paris that hasn’t been touched in over seventy years. Like any curious person who’s been left with something strange from a family member’s will, Alice and her parents decide to spend the summer in Paris. While her parents spend most of the time in their Airbnb, Alice discovers the diary of her grandmother’s sister, Adalyn Bonhomme, and embarks on a quest to learn as much about her family as she can. In a clever twist, the other half of the book is narrated by Alice’s great-aunt: Adalyn. In 1940, sixteen-year-old Adalyn is living in the midst of the Nazi Occupation of France. Everything she’s ever known about her city is changing, and Adalyn is determined to fight back. She joins a resistance group and begins to fall in love herself, but Adalyn soon discovers that the fight for freedom comes with costly repercussions to those she most loves. The dual-narration of Alice and Adalyn presented this book with the opportunity to have one foot in contemporary and the other in historical fiction. It was a fresh and unique method to explore the past…and my personal favorite element of the book. While Alice dives into Adalyn’s diary and breaks down the pieces of the past into modern ideas, Adalyn’s chapters bring the past into the present and make it compelling and immediate. The novel brushes the dust off this chapter of history, but Adalyn’s story would not have felt complete without Alice’s and vice versa. The two young women live in extremely different times, but many parts of their characters felt similar. Both girls have an immense love for their families, but they both also struggle with them. Adalyn’s close relationship with her sister (Alice’s future grandmother) bends precariously throughout the book. And while Alice loves her mother dearly, a large part of Alice’s narration includes frustrated descriptions of her mother’s mental illness and how she longs to help her. Both girls begin serious romantic relationships in the story as well, and as Adalyn becomes more confident in herself, so too does Alice. The parallelism of family struggles and romance connects Alice and Adalyn despite the decades that stretch between them. But that’s where the novel falls just a bit short, in my opinion. While I did enjoy reading about Alice’s discovery of this long-lost great-aunt, once Adalyn’s narration began, Alice’s sections did not feel as powerful as Adalyn’s fight against an oppressive regime. I found myself skimming Alice’s narration in an effort to return to Adalyn’s sections faster. Alice’s complaints about her life and her irresponsible actions seemed petty and immature in comparison to Adalyn’s valiant resistance work. To me, this negative juxtaposition that is only revealed when the two narratives are placed directly next to each other is the downside of the past/present dual-narration. But for the most part, the exploration of the past through the perspectives of one living through it and one discovering it seventy years later was enjoyable and refreshing. There is a very real satisfaction to be had when the past and the present fuse together at the end, and that satisfaction is only possible because of the unique narrative. Review written for Pine Reads Review, a literary publication with reviews, blogs, author interviews, and more. Check out the website at www.pinereadsreview.com! All opinions expressed are my own.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    Before I picked up this book, I had no idea it was historical fiction, and based off of Paris being invaded by Germany during World War II. The cover of the book is what initially grabbed my attention. The Paper Girl of Paris was beautifully done for a YA book and kept me reading to find out what happened when Alice’s grandmother leaves her an apartment in Paris in her will that none of her family was ever aware of. This book had the perfect mixture of mystery, a love story, and a bit of histor Before I picked up this book, I had no idea it was historical fiction, and based off of Paris being invaded by Germany during World War II. The cover of the book is what initially grabbed my attention. The Paper Girl of Paris was beautifully done for a YA book and kept me reading to find out what happened when Alice’s grandmother leaves her an apartment in Paris in her will that none of her family was ever aware of. This book had the perfect mixture of mystery, a love story, and a bit of history that you could want.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    Historical Fiction is my favorite genre, so I knew I had to read this one, and it did NOT disappoint! What an amazing book! I laughed, I cried (quite a lot actually), and I just loved reading every minute of it. The characters are so strong, real, and inspirational. What a talented author. I highly recommend!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Cindy Mitchell *Kiss the Book*

    Paper Girl of Paris by Jordyn Taylor, 368 pages. Harper Teen, 2020. $18 Language: PG (25 swears, 0 “f”); Mature Content: G; Violence: G (deaths mentioned) BUYING ADVISORY: MS, HS - ADVISABLE AUDIENCE APPEAL: AVERAGE 16yo Alice is in Paris with her parents to visit the apartment that her deceased grandmother left as Alice’s inheritance – an apartment her own mother had no idea existed. As she explores her history, she finds that her grandmother had a sister, Adalyn! A sister Alice sees in a photograp Paper Girl of Paris by Jordyn Taylor, 368 pages. Harper Teen, 2020. $18 Language: PG (25 swears, 0 “f”); Mature Content: G; Violence: G (deaths mentioned) BUYING ADVISORY: MS, HS - ADVISABLE AUDIENCE APPEAL: AVERAGE 16yo Alice is in Paris with her parents to visit the apartment that her deceased grandmother left as Alice’s inheritance – an apartment her own mother had no idea existed. As she explores her history, she finds that her grandmother had a sister, Adalyn! A sister Alice sees in a photograph surrounded by Nazi officers. How can this be? Armed with this new aunt’s journal, Alice takes to the streets of Paris to see if she can figure out exactly why Adalyn would be there. With the help of a beautiful boy, Alice delves into life in Paris during World War II. The narrative actually alternates between Alice and Adalyn’s point of view. Taylor’s story is a well-written dance between past and present. World War II books are very popular in almost any school; this is a worthy addition. The romance aspect is nicely to read. Cindy, Library Teacher, MLS https://kissthebook.blogspot.com/2020...

  29. 4 out of 5

    Toni

    The perfect blend of historical fiction and modern realistic fiction with a little romance thrown in. Highly recommend.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jeanette

    4.5 rating for sure. Definitely recommend

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.