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Civil War X-Men: A Marvel Comics Event

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Enough is enough. The tension between the X-Men, the 198 and the O*N*E* has finally reached breaking point. As Civil War rips apart the Marvel Universe, the X-Men also find themselves crumbling from the inside out. Will they admit defeat, or will they finally start to fight back.


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Enough is enough. The tension between the X-Men, the 198 and the O*N*E* has finally reached breaking point. As Civil War rips apart the Marvel Universe, the X-Men also find themselves crumbling from the inside out. Will they admit defeat, or will they finally start to fight back.

30 review for Civil War X-Men: A Marvel Comics Event

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    The X-Men’s Civil War involvement in a nutshell: Emma Frost says to Tony Stark (and I paraphrase), “Yo, we ain’t playin’, bitch, yo! We are gonna be neutral yo.” That’s it! Ya’ll come back now. Ya hear? Fine. Okay. There’s more. This story is on the heels of the House of M crossover event and the 198 mutants that hadn’t been de-powered are left camping out in front of the X-mansion, guarded/protected by some “friendly” Sentinels. Before you can say, “Pass the Smores”, Shatterstar and Domino “rescue” The X-Men’s Civil War involvement in a nutshell: Emma Frost says to Tony Stark (and I paraphrase), “Yo, we ain’t playin’, bitch, yo! We are gonna be neutral yo.” That’s it! Ya’ll come back now. Ya hear? Fine. Okay. There’s more. This story is on the heels of the House of M crossover event and the 198 mutants that hadn’t been de-powered are left camping out in front of the X-mansion, guarded/protected by some “friendly” Sentinels. Before you can say, “Pass the Smores”, Shatterstar and Domino “rescue” all 198 of them or so, and transport them to a secret location. Earwig song time: Can’t read/type Domino without the Van Morrison song popping into my head. Go ahead and try it yourself. Earwig song for Shatterstar: I got nothin’. For once in the Civil War saga, Tony Stark doesn’t come off as a total douche. He and Val Cooper have the best of intentions – protecting the remaining mutants and keeping them separate from the registration process, but as these stories go there’s always someone else to step into the role of mutant hater and that would be General Lazer, who uses Johnny Dee and his suitcase of rare collectible action figures to breed discontent among the mutants. Yes, Virginia, he has a mind-controlling Cthulhu growing out of his chest. So Shatterstar and Domino (“I said oh-oh, Domino”) hide the mutants and it’s up to the X-Men to track them down and help. Mind control hijinks ensue. Yeah, that would be that there previously mentioned mind-controlling Cthulhu boy. Keep up, X-Men! Bottom line: Marvel has repackaged this edition with Civil War: X-Men Universe, which is an excellent collection containing the amusing X-Factor and Deadpool tie-in issues. This is why I gave it four stars; if you get the volume with just the X-Men stories consider it a three star read.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Bookwraiths

    This was a fairly "meh" story arc in the Civil War. Sure, we have the X-men not agreeing with the Superhero Registration Act, and yeah this leads to a bit of problems with the pro-government forces, but really this is standard mutant angst with them doing their own thing. Honesty, I could have skipped this one without missing anything.

  3. 4 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Extremely boring and nothing to do with Civil War till the very end. This was a wrap up for David Hine's other series going on at the same time but I never read those except the Gotham Central version of Mutants. This just didn't work for me at all.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    So this was pretty pointless. The X-Men are really marginalized in the Civil War events, and this book barely even begins to address that. The storyline (which owes more to Decimation and the history of mutants in the Marvel U than to Civil War) is kind of a throwaway plot, and takes up too much space for so little return. It's not bad, just pointless.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Arturo

    Let me try and make the best of a bad title. David Hine wrote District X. A Great series about Bishop as a cop in Mutant Town. Followed by House of M: Mutopia X. And X-Men: The 198 (A Decimation Tie-In) Some subplots from those series continue here. (So it's not totally nonsense to me.) Maybe any other title would of made it more tolerable. Another artist too. The problem with the X-Men and Civil War is that technically they are always in a civil war. Choose a side, Magneto or Xavier. X-Men or Let me try and make the best of a bad title. David Hine wrote District X. A Great series about Bishop as a cop in Mutant Town. Followed by House of M: Mutopia X. And X-Men: The 198 (A Decimation Tie-In) Some subplots from those series continue here. (So it's not totally nonsense to me.) Maybe any other title would of made it more tolerable. Another artist too. The problem with the X-Men and Civil War is that technically they are always in a civil war. Choose a side, Magneto or Xavier. X-Men or X-Force. ..or Government Sanctioned X-Factor. Blue vs Gold. New vs Old. It's not a new story to them. Anyway, Even though I wouldn't want them to stay out it, that probably is the best decision. If they choose a side, whose to say some mutants choose the other. (They DID just have a disagreement about drinking apocalypse's blood. Ugh. What a bad story that was). And like they said, whenever they had problems did other super teams help em out? The story is as interesting as 'we locked ourselves out' ..or in. The Four original guys of the X-men go on a road trip. Yet it all feels like... Getting the X-Men as far and secluded as possible, ..to a desert. I really thought the cover of Bishop against Cyclops was going to be a very interesting idea, yet it let me down. The only reason I'm glad I read this was because it made me less a fan of Bishop. I disliked the ending to Messiah Complex, but now it makes sense. I think the new sentinels showed up here too for added craziness.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lancelot Schaubert

    If you're going to build up "a Marvel event" and sell it as a "Civil War..." If you're going to let it extend across every single mainstream comic series you run... If you're going to let every other long-standing Marvel Hero play a part on one side or the other... WHY ON EARTH WOULD YOU MAKE THE X-MEN NEUTRAL?! They obviously have a STRONG opinion about mutant registration and have for a VERY long time. I don't care if they've got the most to lose as a people being consistently monitored--the If you're going to build up "a Marvel event" and sell it as a "Civil War..." If you're going to let it extend across every single mainstream comic series you run... If you're going to let every other long-standing Marvel Hero play a part on one side or the other... WHY ON EARTH WOULD YOU MAKE THE X-MEN NEUTRAL?! They obviously have a STRONG opinion about mutant registration and have for a VERY long time. I don't care if they've got the most to lose as a people being consistently monitored--the greatest revolutions are started by those who are most oppressed. Was the art pretty? Oh sure, and I'm sure these guys are only working with what upper management gives them--guys like David Hine might not be able to get a say in about whether the X-Men get into the fight. Someone will say, "If you add the whole X-Men team, when do you stop? Who do you exclude?" Plenty of former X-men had integral roles in the story. If you want to do something epic, include the original team.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Travis Duke

    For the time era, this book isn't bad in fact I enjoyed it. The pace is good and the art is better then some art from this time period. Of coarse the story isn't stellar but the Xmen and bishop make it work

  8. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    3.5 stars. It wasn't anything incredible, but it fit in with the Civil war story line.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    I love the X-men, and also the Civil War storyline, but this was just so disappointing. Seemed like a very rushed story and too over the top at times.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Eli

    3.5 stars

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rusty

    X-Men!!! For the first time, maybe ever, I’m talking about those guys. Weird when I think about it, as for a wee bit in my youth they were my favorite comic. I had a run of them that went all the way from the end of the Phoenix saga up until – well, until I started getting kinda bored with the comic and quit reading them altogether, which was somewhere around issue 200. If memory serves, that was 5 year or longer run I had, it’s impressive to me, considering the resources I had (almost none) and X-Men!!! For the first time, maybe ever, I’m talking about those guys. Weird when I think about it, as for a wee bit in my youth they were my favorite comic. I had a run of them that went all the way from the end of the Phoenix saga up until – well, until I started getting kinda bored with the comic and quit reading them altogether, which was somewhere around issue 200. If memory serves, that was 5 year or longer run I had, it’s impressive to me, considering the resources I had (almost none) and the fact if I missed an issue or two when it came out at the newsstand, it would appreciate up to $20 or so so quickly that I couldn’t afford to buy it second hand. Man, collecting sucked. But like I said, it was my favorite comic for a while there and I reread those issues over and over and over again. It’s funny that when I think back on my reading from that time, X-Men felt like something entirely different than the rest of the Marvel Universe (I’m personally happy that Fox has the movie franchise, they always felt like they needed their own self-contained world to live in). I think of Thor and Cap and Iron Man and the rest as something else entirely… and here’s where it gets weirder for me… I remember those titles way more fondly than I do the X-Men. With the rise in comic book movies, and the sorta resurgence in interest it’s made with me in the comics themselves, I’ve had almost zero interest in picking up with the X-Men. I don’t know why that is. I think it has something to do with the bitter taste it left in my mouth when I quite reading. Memory is funny, and unreliable, I know that, but I’m also pretty sure that (along with a couple of other things – like the quickly rising cover prices at the time) my distaste for the X-Men universe led me to quit reading comics altogether when I was a teen. As briefly as I can, I’ll just say it was that Marvel went a tad crossover crazy in the late eighties. I was actually excited when I saw New Mutants #1 on the newsstands, I snatched that up right away, but a few issues in I felt like it wasn’t for me. No worry, I didn’t buy it anymore. Then there was the X-Force, X-Factor, Excalibur (I did actually like Alpha Flight, at least when John Byrne was writing). But the thing was, they more or less quit telling stories that I could follow by just reading the one or two mags I enjoyed, I had to buy them all… even to a somewhat naïve teen, it seemed pretty low. I felt betrayed (again, prices were going up just as they were demanding I buy a bunch of books I didn’t want to in order to understand the story) and I was out. Anyhoo – this book was lying in my office the other day, my son said he just found it downstairs and put it in there. I don’t remember purchasing this in the past, but maybe I did, I don’t know. So, here is the first X-book I’ve picked up in a very long time. And it was not the best. Tons of backstory (that is to be assumed) and lots of characters I’ve never heard of or seen are all interacting and stuff. I didn’t care about anyone involved in any way shape or form, and I ended up really just looking at the pretty pictures. Those were fine. In all, it was plot heavy, forgettable, and not the sort of thing that will make me get all gaga over reading X titles again. There was all the Civil War stuff that I vaguely remember from reading the main event a year or so ago, but this side-story was not very compelling. A bunch of mutants were under house arrest for no clear reason, and so they broke out and went to a secret govt facility to hide in. That secret govt facility was also a stash of WMD's and so the govt decided to blow them all up. The main X-Men went to break them out, or help them hide better, or fight them... I can't remember, or maybe it wasn't clear in the first place. Whatever. It wasn't the best thing ever. I do have the "40 years of X-Men" DVD-rom from several years ago sitting on my shelf (It's a PDF of the entire run of X-Men from their inception all the way up to when the DVD was burned - around 2005), all this talk has me curious about those glory days of the X-Men I was writing about earlier. I may pull that down and read.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rob McMonigal

    So this is what the X-Men have come to? Marginalized by there only being about 200 of them, partnered with Sentinels--Sentinels for God's sake--and taking Tony Stark's help after befriending Captain America long enough to get the information they need. X-Men, you people suck. No wonder Wolverine has (sort of) defected to the Avengers. If this snapshot is indicative of the X-books now, I am sad. They act like also-rans in a world of powerful figures, can't beat a single Sentinel, and Toad--the So this is what the X-Men have come to? Marginalized by there only being about 200 of them, partnered with Sentinels--Sentinels for God's sake--and taking Tony Stark's help after befriending Captain America long enough to get the information they need. X-Men, you people suck. No wonder Wolverine has (sort of) defected to the Avengers. If this snapshot is indicative of the X-books now, I am sad. They act like also-rans in a world of powerful figures, can't beat a single Sentinel, and Toad--the Toad, for crying out load--is better at taking action that Scott Summers. This is an X-Team that didn't even have any precautions for mind control(?) and didn't use their psychics to find out information in a person's brain. The basic plot is that Domino, in the name of her leader Cable (who fights for Iron Man), breaks free some of the remaining mutants from the Mansion. When they hide out in a secret government vault, the original X-Men go on a buddy trip to show how useless they are and generally muck things up. Bishop cops out and sides with the government and soon there's a fake-fight between them that only happens because of mind control. If you're still awake, the fight means nothing and then the mutants are caught in a death trap that only Tony Stark can break them out of. All sides work together to save the day, and the pro-registration folks come out shinier than Stark's armor. It's so uncritical and pro-registration as to be sickening--and completely out of place in the distrust-the-government world of the X-Men. There is absolutely nothing interesting about this one, and it adds nothing to the plot of Civil War as a whole. Totally skip-worthy. (Library, 07/08)

  13. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    No one talks about this TPB/event because it's not good. Unless you love Johnny Dee, random forgotten mutants (when was the last time Caliban was relevant? Who knew Sabra and Micromax had such great chemistry? Why do I have to wiki every character just named?), or to read more about Bishop losing his mind and going against the X-Men - he seems to drank a whole gallon of the Bad Idea juice that Cyclops has been sipping. This is pretty much to show that the mutants did somthing beside sit around No one talks about this TPB/event because it's not good. Unless you love Johnny Dee, random forgotten mutants (when was the last time Caliban was relevant? Who knew Sabra and Micromax had such great chemistry? Why do I have to wiki every character just named?), or to read more about Bishop losing his mind and going against the X-Men - he seems to drank a whole gallon of the Bad Idea juice that Cyclops has been sipping. This is pretty much to show that the mutants did somthing beside sit around and brood over The Sentinel stationed at Xaiver's, Domino and Shatterstar busted them out to a crazy abandoned mine and then Cyclops takes his out First Class homeboys on a road trip to find them, but Bishop and Val Cooper are working with the government,The Avengers, and tag-a-longs Sabra and MicroMax to find them. The mutants they have to save are C-Listers at best (Caliban, Leech, and Toad are the big names), so the sense of urgency never kicks in (Sorry, Leech!).

  14. 5 out of 5

    Omar Chilla

    7.9 solid. A good story and a entertaining comic. Art was pretty good and overall it deserves a 4 not more than that. Not in my top 10 but gets and honorable mention. Great comic and a good civil war addition.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    More side story. Not necessary, but well presented. I applaud Paul Jenkins and Yanick Paquette for their efforts.

  16. 5 out of 5

    C

    Continuing the great X-read of 2017 that has now stretched into 2018... Okay. So I am way behind on reviewing these x-books that I have been reading. So I am going to just kind of ramble about all of them and copy/paste my thoughts. Which will make for a bit of a mess and I am sorry. Quick ramblings: Cable and Deadpool continues to be surprisingly good though a little more scattered in these couple of volumes. X-Men the Blood of Apocalypse was rushed in my opinion... Phoenix Warsong was pretty Continuing the great X-read of 2017 that has now stretched into 2018... Okay. So I am way behind on reviewing these x-books that I have been reading. So I am going to just kind of ramble about all of them and copy/paste my thoughts. Which will make for a bit of a mess and I am sorry. Quick ramblings: Cable and Deadpool continues to be surprisingly good though a little more scattered in these couple of volumes. X-Men the Blood of Apocalypse was rushed in my opinion... Phoenix Warsong was pretty decent. Melodramatic but not a bad story. (and when is a Phoenix story not melodramatic?) New X-Men is a good series with some great characters that grow volume by volume. Uncanny First Foursaken was not my cup of tea really. Black Panther: The Bride was probably much better to BP readers. As part of an X-Men run, it can probably be skipped. Wolverine Origins born in blood was not particularly memorable. Astonishing X-Men will possibly get its own review as it is a reread and interesting as such... Civil War was one of the first times in my life that I could say that the movie was better than the book. For the most part, it was really boring to me. The X-Men universe tie-ins were only slightly more interesting to me. X-factor continues to be a delight. Exiles continues to be great. I need to get back to writing reviews of these as I finish them. Reading them in quick succession like this, I begin to forget what happened in individual books (which I suppose equally speaks to the books themselves and my memory...)

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jake

    Before I start the review I need to add a side note, this volume is essentially two stories. The first 2/3rds are the X-men, which earned the 4 star review, the last 1/3 was deadpool and cable, which I think was a 3 star at best. My review is just going to focus on the X-men segment as this was the part I cared about. Right, so onto the book. I am a little biased, X-men are one of my favorite parts of the Marvel Universe; however, I legitimately found this to be one of the most enjoyable reads of Before I start the review I need to add a side note, this volume is essentially two stories. The first 2/3rds are the X-men, which earned the 4 star review, the last 1/3 was deadpool and cable, which I think was a 3 star at best. My review is just going to focus on the X-men segment as this was the part I cared about. Right, so onto the book. I am a little biased, X-men are one of my favorite parts of the Marvel Universe; however, I legitimately found this to be one of the most enjoyable reads of my reread of this event. The X-men demonstrate some of the potential flaws and problems in Registration, as the act is starkly contrasted by the looming threat of sentinels literally "watching" over the remaining mutant population. This is a reminder of what could happen to the rest of the world's heroes with registration. In addition, the X-men are partially split on supporting or remaining neutral with registration. To make matters more complicated, the X-men end up getting embroiled in a last ditch effort to save 50% of the remaining mutants from catastrophe, while the anti-mutant groups try the opposite. I really liked this volume as it placed the events of the Civil War within the wider events going on in the character's lives. The X-men were already in a bad place, and already registered, so this gives a unique chance to have the Civil War just be part of a larger story. This was a very action light volume, however, I didn't find that to necessarily hurt it. Well worth a read for X-men or Civil War fans

  18. 4 out of 5

    Nelson

    Just meh. Kind of pointless. A lot more could have been done with the X-Men in relation to Civil War and the preceding Decimation. I guess Marvel really wanted to leave the X-Men in their little pocket to deal with the Decimation, but also felt that they had to address how mutants would be incorporated in the Superhuman Registration Act. They were right to address that, but this tie-in was nothing but a half measure. The story boils down to the most throwaway trope they could've possibly Just meh. Kind of pointless. A lot more could have been done with the X-Men in relation to Civil War and the preceding Decimation. I guess Marvel really wanted to leave the X-Men in their little pocket to deal with the Decimation, but also felt that they had to address how mutants would be incorporated in the Superhuman Registration Act. They were right to address that, but this tie-in was nothing but a half measure. The story boils down to the most throwaway trope they could've possibly conceived. The high stakes that threatened to exterminate most of the remaining mutants felt extremely forced and hard to take seriously. The only important point from this story is that mutants are no longer restricted to Xavier Mansion grounds and can wander freely, but they are still considered an endangered species and under the O*N*E's so-called protection, in addition to being immune to the Registration Act for the time being. So basically, nothing changed. As for the art, it was mediocre. The line work was boring, confusing, and muddy. Lots of gratuitous booty shots for whatever reason. Sometimes there was a cool spread, but it still managed to remain boring somehow. How do you manage to make what is meant to be Cyclops' blast at full power being absorbed by Bishop look so goddamn weak and unimpressive? The coloring was equally dull. All in all, this wasn't terrible, but it was incredibly meh all across the board. 4/10

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kurt Pankau

    Three story arcs collected into a single volume that are taking place in the periphery of the Civil War event. The X-Men arc is kind of interesting but is less about Civil War and more about fallout after House Of M. Also, it seems to mostly be in the service of setting up Johnny Dee as an overpowered villain. Most of the conflict resolution consists of characters saying "hey, this reminds me of..." which is kind of unsatisfying. The X-Factor arc in the middle... is not good. The story is Three story arcs collected into a single volume that are taking place in the periphery of the Civil War event. The X-Men arc is kind of interesting but is less about Civil War and more about fallout after House Of M. Also, it seems to mostly be in the service of setting up Johnny Dee as an overpowered villain. Most of the conflict resolution consists of characters saying "hey, this reminds me of..." which is kind of unsatisfying. The X-Factor arc in the middle... is not good. The story is convoluted and the highly-stylized rotoscope-looking art isn't doing it any favors: it's ugly, the characters are indistinguishable and when the story breaks from that art to introduce an element that is more comic-booky, the contrast in styles is jarring. It also makes for a frame that has zero background characters, resulting in stories taking place in a major city that is utterly devoid of life. The Deadpool stuff is fine and probably has the best-executed story arc, it's just not the kind of shenanigans I particularly enjoy.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Adam Stone

    The conclusion to the O*N*E/Decimation/198 storyline in the X-Men books is fairly dull, but it puts the sentinel story to rest for a while, and moves the mutant players to new places on the Chinese Checkerboard of continuity. The art is lazily house style. Paquette tells the story he's given, but often doesn't bother giving background characters eyes or distinctive facial features, and there's a really poorly executed pinup page of many of the characters standing around for no reason after the The conclusion to the O*N*E/Decimation/198 storyline in the X-Men books is fairly dull, but it puts the sentinel story to rest for a while, and moves the mutant players to new places on the Chinese Checkerboard of continuity. The art is lazily house style. Paquette tells the story he's given, but often doesn't bother giving background characters eyes or distinctive facial features, and there's a really poorly executed pinup page of many of the characters standing around for no reason after the big fight, but he has a few good action sequences, and occasionally draws Bishop like he were a Chris Bachalo character, and I enjoyed that. Apart from happening during the Civil War, and showing the X-Men interact with both Iron Man and Captain America's camps, this is much more of a Decimation book than a Civil War story. There's no need to pick it up if you're looking for more Civil War stories, but if you're keeping up with the post House Of M X-Men shenanigans, this is a perfectly servicable story. Not Hines's best, but not terrible, either.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kenneth Clark

    Incredible A solid story. I highly recommend this book for anyone interested in either the X-Men or Civil War. This is a great addition to the X-Men canon and a stirring chapter in the Civil War saga.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Justin Cox

    2 stars until near the end. The addition of Deadpool redeemed this book for me.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tom Williams

    This was... okay. Not terribly interesting or inspired.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    It was readable and filled in some blanks but it was not good

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kanna

    Johnny Dee is really fucking gross.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    A fine tie-in to an event that's also fine. Very X-Men 'boys club'.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This was one of the better entries in the Civil War trade paperbacks. I had to do some Googling to understand all the X-Men characters that were involved, but I really enjoyed that General Lazer was using that rather sick looking mutant to control other mutants in the encounter between the 198 (???) and Iron Man’s “policing” force. Having not read much X-Men at all, seeing the Sentinels in a “peacekeeping” force mode was weird, esp. after how brutal / evil they were in the motion pictures.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Noah

    It wasn’t a good book

  29. 5 out of 5

    Christian Smith

    Plot holes/problems: 1. Twice Lazer was able to find the location of people just by using Johnny D's dolls. Johnny D can control the dolls but he can't read peoples minds with them. 2. How did laser initiate the self-destruct program when he was getting arrested?

  30. 5 out of 5

    Chris Romanelli

    In this graphic novel, the story follows the X-Men during a large dispute and separation among the Marvel Universe. After a large massacre of innocent people, one of the main characters, Wolverine, takes it upon himself to catch the one who did it. However, the government has also sent operatives to do the same task, but Wolverine does not care and continues his pursuit. After the villain, Nitro, is caught, a new act is established that forces all mutants and heroes to register themselves as In this graphic novel, the story follows the X-Men during a large dispute and separation among the Marvel Universe. After a large massacre of innocent people, one of the main characters, Wolverine, takes it upon himself to catch the one who did it. However, the government has also sent operatives to do the same task, but Wolverine does not care and continues his pursuit. After the villain, Nitro, is caught, a new act is established that forces all mutants and heroes to register themselves as heroes or mutants for government record. The separation occurs when half of the Marvel Universe decides to rebel against the act and other tries to follow it. The half that wish to rebel follow Iron Man, and the other half follows Captain America. The main conflict throughout the story is between the two sides. My personal favorite character in the story would be Deadpool because he provides a lot of the action and comedy throughout the story. It was hard to relate to any of the characters in the story, mainly because they are super-humans who fight crime. However, there were aspects to the story that I could relate to. This includes separation and how to handle conflict among your peers. I thought the book was decent, but not stunning. It had a lot of intriguing elements to it, such as many conflicts and disputes, but it lacked a lot to its story arc. My favorite part of the book would probably be when Wolverine catches Nitro because that was a big action scene in the book. My least favorite part would pretty much be anything where there are just government officials talking because it was pretty boring and was distracting from the main action, which is what I felt the book was mainly about. The author did a great job with the pacing of the book, however some of the dialogue seemed unrealistic and oddly worded. I would recommend this book to anyone who is interested in the Marvel Universe, or anyone who likes comics. I would also recommend the book to anyone who wants to see the movie Captain America: Civil War because this will help give insight and background for the movie. However, I would not recommend this book to anyone who is looking for a deep, intellectual story and plot to it.

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