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Selected Letters of André Gide & Dorothy Bussy

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The French Novelist André Gide first met Dorothy Bussy in the summer of 1918; it was a chance encounter of the utmost significance for both of them. For both it was the start of a friendship that was to last over thirty years, and of a business relationship of equal duration, since Dorothy Bussy was to translate all Gide's major works into English in that time. And for Dor The French Novelist André Gide first met Dorothy Bussy in the summer of 1918; it was a chance encounter of the utmost significance for both of them. For both it was the start of a friendship that was to last over thirty years, and of a business relationship of equal duration, since Dorothy Bussy was to translate all Gide's major works into English in that time. And for Dorothy it was the spark of a passion that burned as ardently at the end of her life as at the age of fifty-two. These letters chart the course of a remarkable relationship; since they rarely met, they conversed on paper, and were better able to express the anguish, jealousy, and love (on her part), the concern and circumspection (on his), they felt. The letters are fascinating not only for the personal drams they record, but for the wide-ranging and lively discussion of mutual friends (many in the public eye), of literature in general and Gide's works in particular, of the art and difficulty of translation, and of events that touched them over the years. On an intellectual level that were equals: Dorothy was a Strachey, the sister of a Lytton, married to the French painter Simon Bussy; among her friends she numbered members of the Bloomsbury circle. And she was a novelist in her own right, the anonymous author of Olivia, a book whose neglect and eventual publication are described in these pages.


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The French Novelist André Gide first met Dorothy Bussy in the summer of 1918; it was a chance encounter of the utmost significance for both of them. For both it was the start of a friendship that was to last over thirty years, and of a business relationship of equal duration, since Dorothy Bussy was to translate all Gide's major works into English in that time. And for Dor The French Novelist André Gide first met Dorothy Bussy in the summer of 1918; it was a chance encounter of the utmost significance for both of them. For both it was the start of a friendship that was to last over thirty years, and of a business relationship of equal duration, since Dorothy Bussy was to translate all Gide's major works into English in that time. And for Dorothy it was the spark of a passion that burned as ardently at the end of her life as at the age of fifty-two. These letters chart the course of a remarkable relationship; since they rarely met, they conversed on paper, and were better able to express the anguish, jealousy, and love (on her part), the concern and circumspection (on his), they felt. The letters are fascinating not only for the personal drams they record, but for the wide-ranging and lively discussion of mutual friends (many in the public eye), of literature in general and Gide's works in particular, of the art and difficulty of translation, and of events that touched them over the years. On an intellectual level that were equals: Dorothy was a Strachey, the sister of a Lytton, married to the French painter Simon Bussy; among her friends she numbered members of the Bloomsbury circle. And she was a novelist in her own right, the anonymous author of Olivia, a book whose neglect and eventual publication are described in these pages.

15 review for Selected Letters of André Gide & Dorothy Bussy

  1. 4 out of 5

    Cera

    Dorothy Bussy (née Strachey) met Andre Gide when they were both in their 50s, developed a passion for him, and also became his English translator. This selection of their letters begins around 1918 and goes through to Gide's death in the early 50s. I began reading this for Bussy, because I love her novel Olivia so much, but by the end I was reading it much more for Gide. The relationship between the two was often painful; Bussy seems to have been incapable of understanding how the unrequited rom Dorothy Bussy (née Strachey) met Andre Gide when they were both in their 50s, developed a passion for him, and also became his English translator. This selection of their letters begins around 1918 and goes through to Gide's death in the early 50s. I began reading this for Bussy, because I love her novel Olivia so much, but by the end I was reading it much more for Gide. The relationship between the two was often painful; Bussy seems to have been incapable of understanding how the unrequited romantic love she felt left Gide feeling somewhat persecuted as well as very sad that he was unable to satisfy a woman whom he loved very much as a friend & respected as a translator. The constant push-pull in their relationship is exhausting to read; Bussy writes a long emotionally demanding letter, Gide's warm & friendly response fails to satisfy her, she writes another declaring that he wouldn't care if she vanished from the earth, he writes another warm but somewhat impatient response asking why she won't trust in his friendship for her, and then she writes an embarassed, apologetic letter in reply... and all is well until the cycle begins again a few months later. In the midst of all this emotional drama, I found some fascinating thoughts about literature -- Hamlet, Cicero's letters -- and about contemporary events, which has inspired me to begin reading Gide's journals.

  2. 5 out of 5

    isabella

    i read a 50 page selection from this bc it's the only digital version i could find, but maybe when my university library opens again i will try and find the whole edition because honestly dorothy's letters are so ... - i struggle to find the word for it - endearing in a serious way. the way she writes to gide is so vulnerable and shattering and the way she writes about translation is so intelligent. dream dinner guest for sure!!! read for Women In Translation Month Aug 2020.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Will

  4. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

  5. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Warnes

  6. 4 out of 5

    Bill

  7. 4 out of 5

    Pipkia

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lance

  9. 4 out of 5

    Anna Blair

  10. 4 out of 5

    rêveur d'art

  11. 4 out of 5

    Вујке

  12. 5 out of 5

    Stefano

  13. 4 out of 5

    Elie

  14. 5 out of 5

    William Burr

  15. 4 out of 5

    Julia

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