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Quentin Durward by Sir Walter Scott, Fiction, Historical, Literary

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The plot centers on the medieval rivalry between Louis XI of France and Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy. Louis incites the citizens of Li�ge to revolt against Charles, and they seize and murder Charles's brother-in-law, Louis de Bourbon, Bishop of Li�ge, under the command of Louis's ally, William de la Marck, who was hoping to install his son in Louis de Bourbon's place The plot centers on the medieval rivalry between Louis XI of France and Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy. Louis incites the citizens of Li�ge to revolt against Charles, and they seize and murder Charles's brother-in-law, Louis de Bourbon, Bishop of Li�ge, under the command of Louis's ally, William de la Marck, who was hoping to install his son in Louis de Bourbon's place (a real historical event which occurred in 1482). "The latter part of the fifteenth century prepared a train of future events that ended by raising France to that state of formidable power. Before that period she had to struggle for her very existence, with the English already possessed of her fairest provinces while the utmost exertions of her King and the gallantry of her people could scarcely protect the remainder from a foreign yoke. Nor was this her sole danger. The princes who possessed the grand fiefs of the crown, and, in particular, the Dukes of Burgundy and Bretagne, had come to wear their feudal bonds so lightly that they had no scruple in lifting the standard against their liege and sovereign lord, the King of France, on the slightest pretense. When at peace, they reigned as absolute princes in their own provinces; and the House of Burgundy was itself so wealthy, and so powerful, as to yield nothing to the crown, either in splendor or in strength. In imitation of the grand feudatories, each inferior vassal of the crown assumed as much independence as his distance from the sovereign power, the extent of his fief, or the strength of his chateau enabled him to maintain; and these petty tyrants, no longer amenable to the exercise of the law, perpetrated with impunity the wildest excesses of fantastic oppression and cruelty. . . ." -- Sir Walter Scott


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The plot centers on the medieval rivalry between Louis XI of France and Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy. Louis incites the citizens of Li�ge to revolt against Charles, and they seize and murder Charles's brother-in-law, Louis de Bourbon, Bishop of Li�ge, under the command of Louis's ally, William de la Marck, who was hoping to install his son in Louis de Bourbon's place The plot centers on the medieval rivalry between Louis XI of France and Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy. Louis incites the citizens of Li�ge to revolt against Charles, and they seize and murder Charles's brother-in-law, Louis de Bourbon, Bishop of Li�ge, under the command of Louis's ally, William de la Marck, who was hoping to install his son in Louis de Bourbon's place (a real historical event which occurred in 1482). "The latter part of the fifteenth century prepared a train of future events that ended by raising France to that state of formidable power. Before that period she had to struggle for her very existence, with the English already possessed of her fairest provinces while the utmost exertions of her King and the gallantry of her people could scarcely protect the remainder from a foreign yoke. Nor was this her sole danger. The princes who possessed the grand fiefs of the crown, and, in particular, the Dukes of Burgundy and Bretagne, had come to wear their feudal bonds so lightly that they had no scruple in lifting the standard against their liege and sovereign lord, the King of France, on the slightest pretense. When at peace, they reigned as absolute princes in their own provinces; and the House of Burgundy was itself so wealthy, and so powerful, as to yield nothing to the crown, either in splendor or in strength. In imitation of the grand feudatories, each inferior vassal of the crown assumed as much independence as his distance from the sovereign power, the extent of his fief, or the strength of his chateau enabled him to maintain; and these petty tyrants, no longer amenable to the exercise of the law, perpetrated with impunity the wildest excesses of fantastic oppression and cruelty. . . ." -- Sir Walter Scott

30 review for Quentin Durward by Sir Walter Scott, Fiction, Historical, Literary

  1. 5 out of 5

    Curtiss

    I recently watched the Hollywood movie version of Quentin Durward (in several Youtube installments), starring Robert Taylor, Kaye Kendall, and Robert Morley; and I decided to pick up a used hard-bound copy to read in the original literary format. Even after having read barely 70 pages of the book, including the 33-page "Introduction", I was able to affirm that for once Hollywood captured the book's droll, ironic humor, especially in the on-screen characterization of Louis XI (aka the "Spider Kin I recently watched the Hollywood movie version of Quentin Durward (in several Youtube installments), starring Robert Taylor, Kaye Kendall, and Robert Morley; and I decided to pick up a used hard-bound copy to read in the original literary format. Even after having read barely 70 pages of the book, including the 33-page "Introduction", I was able to affirm that for once Hollywood captured the book's droll, ironic humor, especially in the on-screen characterization of Louis XI (aka the "Spider King") as he was portrayed by Robert Morley. I found myself chuckling aload at several passages in the introduction alone, in which Scott spends 31 pages describing a visit to France during a decline in his fortunes and his dismay at the ensuing conversion of his neice, Christian, to Catholicism, and her subsequent enrollment in a convent, and at his fifty-year-old Aunt's marriage to a French pop-in-jay described as looking "as if one pair of half-extended compasses had been placed perpendicularly upon the top of another, while the space on which the hinges revolved quite sufficed to represent the body ... the rest was mustache, pelisse, and callico trouser." Scott eventually got around to the point of having an introduction, where (after 30+ pages) his host's remote Scottish lineage and extensive library of illuminated works on French history became the inspiration for this story about a Scottish adventurer's exploits during the era when Louis XI's Pre-Machiavellian intrigues solidified France into a modern state while simultaneously putting the final nails in the coffins of both feudalism and the obsolescent "code of chivalry." I finally finished the book, and it maintained its droll irony and dead-pan gallows-humor throughout! Very amusing - not at all what I had expected from Sir Walter Scott of all people.

  2. 4 out of 5

    J t

    Incredible! My 7th Scott novel in as many months. The fastest paced and most action packed i have read so far. A novel of great chivalry, romance and adventure. Scott shows himself again to be the all-time master of the historical novel. Really looking forward to learning more about French history after this. Was reading a review by Victor Hugo where he writes in ecstasy at the genius of Scott and the brilliance of Quentin Durward. It was as a major hit in continental Europe in its day, a childh Incredible! My 7th Scott novel in as many months. The fastest paced and most action packed i have read so far. A novel of great chivalry, romance and adventure. Scott shows himself again to be the all-time master of the historical novel. Really looking forward to learning more about French history after this. Was reading a review by Victor Hugo where he writes in ecstasy at the genius of Scott and the brilliance of Quentin Durward. It was as a major hit in continental Europe in its day, a childhood favourite of the Great Dostoevsky. The Scott novel I would most recommend to those unfamiliar with his work.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kristy

    I have to admit I was a little surprised by how engaging, exciting, and funny this historical novel by Sir Walter Scott was. This novel, written in 1823, tells the story of Quentin Durward, a wandering Scottish nobleman who goes to France to make his fortune and ends up serving in the Scottish Guard of the French King, Louis XI. Quentin is as noble and true and chivalrous as Louis is sneaky, cruel, and out for number one, but together they make a pretty good team and a very satisfying story. Als I have to admit I was a little surprised by how engaging, exciting, and funny this historical novel by Sir Walter Scott was. This novel, written in 1823, tells the story of Quentin Durward, a wandering Scottish nobleman who goes to France to make his fortune and ends up serving in the Scottish Guard of the French King, Louis XI. Quentin is as noble and true and chivalrous as Louis is sneaky, cruel, and out for number one, but together they make a pretty good team and a very satisfying story. Also includes a damsel in distress, some pointedly two-faced religious devotions, and some pretty racist comments about the gypsies.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jo

    This novel should have been called Louis XI, but then no one would have read it. I actually enjoy Sir W's flow of words, and in his depictions the medieval period is just what one would wish it to be; but as usual I ended up disappointed with the book. King Louis of France is an interesting character and he and his accomplices and opponents have absorbing dialogues, but Quentin and his lady love are just like the illustrations (by C. Bosseron Chambers) in my edition - obviously artificial and som This novel should have been called Louis XI, but then no one would have read it. I actually enjoy Sir W's flow of words, and in his depictions the medieval period is just what one would wish it to be; but as usual I ended up disappointed with the book. King Louis of France is an interesting character and he and his accomplices and opponents have absorbing dialogues, but Quentin and his lady love are just like the illustrations (by C. Bosseron Chambers) in my edition - obviously artificial and sometimes laughably posed. And there's no closure to any of the meaningful events or characters in the story. As soon as the guy gets the girl, 'nuff said, I guess. I highly recommend envisioning the actors Rufus Sewell as King Louis and Jason O'Mara as the Duke of Burgundy.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Avd.Reader

    I read this long ago and liked it very much. The story is about a young archer, Quentin Durward, who leaves his native Scotland to serve in the Scottish Guard of Louis XI of France. As security detail he accompanies the beautiful Isabelle De Croye of Burgundy on a journey to Flanders. The lady is promised in marriage to quite a few men within the story: first to an odious nobleman in the Burgundy court, then to a bandit, next to the Duke of Orleans. When she refuses the Duke, he promises her to I read this long ago and liked it very much. The story is about a young archer, Quentin Durward, who leaves his native Scotland to serve in the Scottish Guard of Louis XI of France. As security detail he accompanies the beautiful Isabelle De Croye of Burgundy on a journey to Flanders. The lady is promised in marriage to quite a few men within the story: first to an odious nobleman in the Burgundy court, then to a bandit, next to the Duke of Orleans. When she refuses the Duke, he promises her to whoever will kill the bandit she was once to marry. Quentin, true romance hero that he is, performs this task admirably and thereby gains Isabell's love and hand in marriage. This was quite long. An enjoyable cloak and dagger novel with lots of historical detail about 15th-century France and Scotland.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Esdaile

    This is an enjoyable historical romance. Scott's strength is character portrayal, where portrayal is the operative word, because he paints his colourful characters with words. They are vivid, they are larger than life. Having read several of his novels now I realise that he works according to a template of hero, damsel in distress, scheming villain, atheist and the like. however, his depiction of Charles the Bold of Burgundy and Louis XI of France known as the Spider King, is powerful and highly This is an enjoyable historical romance. Scott's strength is character portrayal, where portrayal is the operative word, because he paints his colourful characters with words. They are vivid, they are larger than life. Having read several of his novels now I realise that he works according to a template of hero, damsel in distress, scheming villain, atheist and the like. however, his depiction of Charles the Bold of Burgundy and Louis XI of France known as the Spider King, is powerful and highly enjoyable. There is a fair amount of humour and much of the grotesque. Scott does not shy away from the horrors of the time without dwelling on them in any malicious manner. He interweaves fictional and historical characters, which is presumably the particular skill of the successful historical novelist.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lucy

    "Aroint thee, deceitful witch! Why, this device smells rank as the toasted cheese in a rat trap. Now fie, and double fie, upon the old decoy duck!" I quite enjoyed this my third venture into Scott (Ivanhoe and Waverley, previously) because it does have it's funny moments and the characters are somewhat more believable. He doesn't believe in using ten words when a hundred will do, though. But I might venture another....

  8. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    My second favorite of Scott's work---next to Ivanhoe. A good action/adventure story set against the interesting backdrop of 1400s France. The conflict between King Louis and Charles of Burgundy was fun for me to read about, but anyone can enjoy characters like Lady Hamelina and the naive, honest hero, Quentin Durward himself. The book has more humor than you'd expect, and that's a plus. I recommend this to anyone interested in trying out Scott's other novels--besides Ivanhoe.

  9. 4 out of 5

    F

    Such a good adventure story - one can see why he was so much admired as a writer throughout Europe. He is a master at pacing - knows exactly when to linger over description, and when to move on speedily with action. I enjoyed this thoroughly - a good 'romance'. having just spent time looking at knights in the Playmobil catalogue, this is the perfect follow-on reading.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lamees

    Love ..Love this story

  11. 5 out of 5

    Victoria Jackson

    My type of historical novel set in Burgundy and France. Hero a Scotsman. References to Edward IV. Plot intervowen into English politics and the Wars of the Roses. Adventure and travel in France.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Yana Huryn

    I really liked the book, maybe not Scott's most popular thing but surely one of the finest.

  13. 4 out of 5

    June

    Awesome

  14. 4 out of 5

    Al

    This wonderful book follows the adventures of youthful Quentin Durward, a young Scotsman seeking fulfillment in 15th century France during the reign of the diabolical Louis XI. Sir Walter combines an exciting story line, richly defined characters, betrayal and redemption, and sparkling (if somewhat dated) prose to produce a timeless tale. I've nitpicked other Scott work for such things as impenetrable dialect and slow pace, but this book excels in all areas. Highly recommended for those who lik This wonderful book follows the adventures of youthful Quentin Durward, a young Scotsman seeking fulfillment in 15th century France during the reign of the diabolical Louis XI. Sir Walter combines an exciting story line, richly defined characters, betrayal and redemption, and sparkling (if somewhat dated) prose to produce a timeless tale. I've nitpicked other Scott work for such things as impenetrable dialect and slow pace, but this book excels in all areas. Highly recommended for those who like such things. Be sure to read Scott's introduction to the book for historical context.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    After historical novels featuring Mary Queen of Scots, James I, Charles I, and Charles II, the author branches out to France, featuring Louis XI and the Duke of Burgundy. As he did in the previous novels, the author does a masterful job of getting inside the heads of the historical characters, based on his own research into their personalities and characters. And so the reader is taken for an adventurous ride through the France of the time period, and along the way learns about the common people After historical novels featuring Mary Queen of Scots, James I, Charles I, and Charles II, the author branches out to France, featuring Louis XI and the Duke of Burgundy. As he did in the previous novels, the author does a masterful job of getting inside the heads of the historical characters, based on his own research into their personalities and characters. And so the reader is taken for an adventurous ride through the France of the time period, and along the way learns about the common people of France, the nobility of France, and about the king's guard of Scottish soldiers. Another excellent book by Scott, more of a page-turner than some of his earlier books.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Fay

    Great action, good humor and a picturesque setting as Scott always delivers. But for this one, also a nice introduction to a period of French history less well known to me - the mid 15th century while the King of France was still struggling with Burgundy to weld together the modern French state. Many memorable characters from Quentin who is like a younger, Scottish D'Artagnan, the always composed, perfectly cynical Louis XI and the well-meaning but utterly rash Charles of Burgundy, down to the c Great action, good humor and a picturesque setting as Scott always delivers. But for this one, also a nice introduction to a period of French history less well known to me - the mid 15th century while the King of France was still struggling with Burgundy to weld together the modern French state. Many memorable characters from Quentin who is like a younger, Scottish D'Artagnan, the always composed, perfectly cynical Louis XI and the well-meaning but utterly rash Charles of Burgundy, down to the comic relief of Louis' mismatched pair of over-worked executioners.

  17. 4 out of 5

    KEVIN D

    I've become a huge Walter Scott fan. This story is not a fast paced action thriller. It's the classic style of moderate pacing to get to know the characters fully and then the action starts and progresses towards the payoff. The character of King Louis XI of France is very deep and not the usual for the villain of the story. Scott really gets into his mindset and machinations so that you can dislike him and yet somewhat root for him at the same time. The hero, Quentin Durward, is a young Scott s I've become a huge Walter Scott fan. This story is not a fast paced action thriller. It's the classic style of moderate pacing to get to know the characters fully and then the action starts and progresses towards the payoff. The character of King Louis XI of France is very deep and not the usual for the villain of the story. Scott really gets into his mindset and machinations so that you can dislike him and yet somewhat root for him at the same time. The hero, Quentin Durward, is a young Scott set on adventure who finds plenty. Great story for young and old alike.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Stas Lebedenko

    Some kind of achievement for me. Finally, read "Quentin Durward" by Walter Scott in original and expand my English vocabulary with about 50 words, that would be useful for reenactment ). Great book, definitely the good read, as it was in my childhood. PS. Historical notes and references alongside the text are great too.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jonni Rich

    I confess I have read this book more than once. It's that good. The Scottish archers mercenaries in France. Quentin, a young man from Scotland seeks his fortune in France and finds more than he bargained for. For starters, a hangman's rope. A great historical. Highly recomended.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Djordje

    My rating: ★★★✫

  21. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    Best Sir Walter scott I have read. Underrated in my option.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Byram

    I discovered this book when I learned that it inspired Victor Hugo's novel The Hunchback Of Notre-Dame.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Steve R

    The title character is a typical Hhero for Scott: young, ambitious, brave, adept at swordplay, of impeccable honor, hopelessly romantic and in love with a very beautiful but seemingly unattainable young lady. Set in fifteenth century France, the novel is really more about the rivalry between King Louis XI of France and Charles the Bold, the Duke of Burgundy. The main issue arising between them , which each of them use to get the better of their rival, is the marriage of Isabelle of Croye. It is The title character is a typical Hhero for Scott: young, ambitious, brave, adept at swordplay, of impeccable honor, hopelessly romantic and in love with a very beautiful but seemingly unattainable young lady. Set in fifteenth century France, the novel is really more about the rivalry between King Louis XI of France and Charles the Bold, the Duke of Burgundy. The main issue arising between them , which each of them use to get the better of their rival, is the marriage of Isabelle of Croye. It is in this tussle of wills that Quentin gets involved, initially as a pawn of Louis, then later, as a boon to both of them when he relates information about a stratagem to be used by a common foe, the Boar of Ardennes, William de la Merck. Louis, Charles and William were all actual personages, and Scott lets the reader know in his notes how he has bent history to his novelistic ends. Of especial interest are the characters of Martius Galeotti, a soothsayer to Louis, who escapes the wrath of his leader for giving him seemingly bad advice in a quite remarkable manner and Hayraddin Maugrabin, a gypsy who conspires to lead the fair damsel astray but is thwarted in this attempt by the erstwhile Quentin. He eventually goes to his death (at the hands of Tristan l'Hermite, the Provost Marshal, and his two attendant executioners) totally unrepentant and consistently irreligious: a mark of Scott's willingness to understand the uniqueness of this interesting subsection of humanity. The Cardinal Balue, who meets a truly discomforting end; the barber/advisor Oliver Dain, who is compared to a cat for his stealth and sneekiness; Quentin's uncle, Ludovic Lesly, Le Balafre (the 'scarred') who steps aside for his nephew while encountering an absolute inability to put into words what he feels; Philip de Comines, an advisor to Burgundy who, in one of the longest and most interesting chapters of the novel, advises Louis on how to approach Charles in upcoming negotiations with consummate political tact; Lady Hemeline, who is described as 'that blundering, romantic, old match-making and match-seeking idiot' by the Count de Crevecoeur, who is himself a refreshingly blunt observer of all the conflicting motivations and actions of those around him help round out this thoroughly satisfying picture of the France of the late feudal period. A masterful development of character, plot and social observation.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Realini

    Quentin Durward by Walter Scott 6 out of 10 This not the best work I had in my hands. I venture to say far from it. The king of France has a conflict with the duke of Burgundy. There is also a damsel in distress and caught in the plot the young hero- Quentin Durward. I did not enjoy this so much, even if there are some adventures… Well, sort of. The duke of Burgundy is upset, because a girl from his court has escaped and found refuge with the king of France. We meet his majesty early on, but in disguise. Quentin Durward by Walter Scott 6 out of 10 This not the best work I had in my hands. I venture to say far from it. The king of France has a conflict with the duke of Burgundy. There is also a damsel in distress and caught in the plot the young hero- Quentin Durward. I did not enjoy this so much, even if there are some adventures… Well, sort of. The duke of Burgundy is upset, because a girl from his court has escaped and found refuge with the king of France. We meet his majesty early on, but in disguise. There are some people who have been hanged, apparently for petty or wrong reasons. Charles, duke of Burgundy offends Louis XI, king of France. His ambassador acts rudely at the court of his highness and a conflict is started. As I think back about the play that I listened to this morning, I realize that the adaptation may be to blame. Perhaps the original is wonderful. But then my notes refer to what I experienced and they serve as reference to no one except myself and are unprofessional and subjective. The ingredients are present- - Duels, intrigue, romantic endeavors and even trumpets But something was wrong or missing. It might also be that after a series of excellent works a disappointment comes only naturally and will make the next masterpieces even more meaningful. Quentin Durward acts like a typical positive hero. He comes on horseback, like any knight in shining armor must. He fights with the enemy to protect ladies. Valiant like no other and yet a bit rude for this snobbish reader. The damsel falls for him and this I guess is how it should be. She sounds a bit (or more?) ridiculous when she exclaims: - Quentin!! – - but it comes back to the vision of those who adapted the material for the National theater The lady is very concerned for the man she loves. Quentin declares his own love in what may have resembled Romeo and Juliet, Daphne and Chloe, Marcel and Albertine and many others. But again- in the original…in the version that I heard it does not work. When the acting is supposed to be serious, grave and suggesting feelings of terror, awe and outrage- it merely seems somewhat funny. From where I heard it and in the state that I was. Maybe the coming of spring with strong whiffs of summer has altered my senses and made an impact so big that I do not know left from right… And a good story from a bad one.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Andrey

    When I first read this novel in high school, I really liked it and always thought it was an excellent historical adventure novel (there is probably a better term for this type of literature). After reading another novel about mercenaries recently, I decided to re-read Quentin Durward just to remind myself of how novels about mercenaries really should be written. Well, this experience was pretty interesting. The story is about the French king Louis XI as much as it is about the Scottish Archer, Que When I first read this novel in high school, I really liked it and always thought it was an excellent historical adventure novel (there is probably a better term for this type of literature). After reading another novel about mercenaries recently, I decided to re-read Quentin Durward just to remind myself of how novels about mercenaries really should be written. Well, this experience was pretty interesting. The story is about the French king Louis XI as much as it is about the Scottish Archer, Quentin Durward who serves the French king. In fact, there is probably more text dedicated to the king and his affairs. This side of the story really slows the flow of the book although shows in detail what kind of monarch and politic Louis XI really was - you will be repulsed by his actions and you will admire him a little. It sounds crazy but think about it - how can you admire a story about adventures of a person who kills for money (mercenary)? If you do, why not admire the king who is smart and ruthless at the same time (or is it the same thing?)? The adventures feel ancient in character and a bit naive (think knights fighting for their dames) but it's still enjoyable if you manage to sleep through the boring parts (maybe it's just me but this is my review so...). Overall, I found that I only got interested in the story after I've gone though 2/3 of the book. And all I could say in the end was, "Well, good for him. What do I read next?"

  26. 5 out of 5

    Robert Hepple

    Walter Scott’s novel of 1823 follows a Scottish nobleman to 15th century France where he seeks his fortune as a mercenary working for the devious King Louis XI. Quentin Durward believes in chivalry in an age when chivalry is going out of fashion, but sticks to his principles throughout in spite of many obstacles. This is but one example of the various impressively realised characterisations in the novel, against a fast moving action packed story with occasional moments of gutsy violence. The bac Walter Scott’s novel of 1823 follows a Scottish nobleman to 15th century France where he seeks his fortune as a mercenary working for the devious King Louis XI. Quentin Durward believes in chivalry in an age when chivalry is going out of fashion, but sticks to his principles throughout in spite of many obstacles. This is but one example of the various impressively realised characterisations in the novel, against a fast moving action packed story with occasional moments of gutsy violence. The background details and many of the characters have some historical basis, although various notes point out how some events have been moved into different time periods for the convenience of the story, a not unusual device in historical novels. Arguably, the novel has its faults – some readers will find that the numerous footnotes slow down the plot, but I actually found them informative. The gipsy characters, also referred to as Bohemians, seem to be the typecast two dimensional untrustworthy foreigners of pulp fiction. I enjoyed it immensely, a rare example of a fast-paced 19th century novel. It helps if you try to forget the appalling 1950s movie version.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ralf Grisard

    Disappointing Having long ago read and enjoyed Scott's Ivanhoe, I looked forward to a tale of rousing adventure with Quentin Durward. Unfortunately, I found this to be a ponderous read, rife with antiquated and sometimes incomprehensible terminology as well as a great excess of verbosity. Oddly, most of the story was less about the adventures of the title character than about the machinations of the wily and unscrupulous monarch Louis XI, and I found this emphasis to be unenjoyable.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Briynne

    Finished! I have officially exhausted all of the Scott in my collection, ladies and gentlemen, and I’m free at last :) I shouldn’t be so dramatic, but I liked this even less than “Kenilworth” – I guess I’ll just be thankful that I didn’t go for this one first. I have no desire to write about this book, so this is going to be short. The story was tedious and I had nearly zero investment in the characters or their aspirations. I pictured Quentin as Justin Bieber in armor; he was a complete ninny. Finished! I have officially exhausted all of the Scott in my collection, ladies and gentlemen, and I’m free at last :) I shouldn’t be so dramatic, but I liked this even less than “Kenilworth” – I guess I’ll just be thankful that I didn’t go for this one first. I have no desire to write about this book, so this is going to be short. The story was tedious and I had nearly zero investment in the characters or their aspirations. I pictured Quentin as Justin Bieber in armor; he was a complete ninny. Isabelle was incredibly boring, and her only discernable purpose was to be rescued and to melodramatically throw herself on the mercy of various and sundry noblemen. Her bitter spinster aunt was admittedly quite funny, and Crevecoeur was amusing as well for mercilessly making fun of Quentin’s puppy love. But other than that, this was a snooze.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Oceana2602

    Did I mention that I read everything as a kid? Well, I should have mentioned that not everything stood out. This book, for example, didn't. This is probably not the books fault, more likely it is because whenever I think about the adventure novels that I loved as a kid, the wonderful "Ein Brief für den König" by Tonke Dragt stands out above all. It was one of my favourite books ever. So I assume that I liked "Im Auftrag des Königs" as well, but I just don't remember much about it.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Snail in Danger (Sid) Nicolaides

    Mentioned in The Prince Commands. I like to check out the oldest possible editions ... this is probably from either 1900 or 1901, but the book itself is not dated. Mentioned in The Prince Commands. I like to check out the oldest possible editions ... this is probably from either 1900 or 1901, but the book itself is not dated.

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