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32 Stories: The Complete Optic Nerve Mini-Comics

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In 1991, Adrian Tomine self-published the first issue of Optic Nerve. Consisting of three xeroxed sheets of paper, and with a print run of twenty-five, it was a less-than-auspicious, largely unnoticed debut. In the following three years, though, Optic Nerve developed at a startlingly rapid pace: the artwork and writing evolved with each story, production quality improved, In 1991, Adrian Tomine self-published the first issue of Optic Nerve. Consisting of three xeroxed sheets of paper, and with a print run of twenty-five, it was a less-than-auspicious, largely unnoticed debut. In the following three years, though, Optic Nerve developed at a startlingly rapid pace: the artwork and writing evolved with each story, production quality improved, page counts increased, and by issue seven, sales had reached 6,000. In 1994, Drawn & Quarterly took over the publishing duties of Optic Nerve, and the original seven issues sold out and were left out of print. 32 stories presents these rare, early editions, collected for the first time in a single volume.


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In 1991, Adrian Tomine self-published the first issue of Optic Nerve. Consisting of three xeroxed sheets of paper, and with a print run of twenty-five, it was a less-than-auspicious, largely unnoticed debut. In the following three years, though, Optic Nerve developed at a startlingly rapid pace: the artwork and writing evolved with each story, production quality improved, In 1991, Adrian Tomine self-published the first issue of Optic Nerve. Consisting of three xeroxed sheets of paper, and with a print run of twenty-five, it was a less-than-auspicious, largely unnoticed debut. In the following three years, though, Optic Nerve developed at a startlingly rapid pace: the artwork and writing evolved with each story, production quality improved, page counts increased, and by issue seven, sales had reached 6,000. In 1994, Drawn & Quarterly took over the publishing duties of Optic Nerve, and the original seven issues sold out and were left out of print. 32 stories presents these rare, early editions, collected for the first time in a single volume.

30 review for 32 Stories: The Complete Optic Nerve Mini-Comics

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ill D

    https://i.pinimg.com/736x/ba/b2/73/ba... Did you know that Andy Warhol used to draw weird shit like Del Monte peach cans? Of course not! Because no body gives a shit about Del Monte peach cans. Nor did they give a shit about a ton of other of earlier shit he did. They care about Monroe! They care about Elvis! They care about Pop Art! This same collection akin to an "early years," album is the style du jour of Adrian Tomine's: Optic Nerve. Sometimes it fun to see an artist grow and change. And https://i.pinimg.com/736x/ba/b2/73/ba... Did you know that Andy Warhol used to draw weird shit like Del Monte peach cans? Of course not! Because no body gives a shit about Del Monte peach cans. Nor did they give a shit about a ton of other of earlier shit he did. They care about Monroe! They care about Elvis! They care about Pop Art! This same collection akin to an "early years," album is the style du jour of Adrian Tomine's: Optic Nerve. Sometimes it fun to see an artist grow and change. And sometimes it's not. This paper thin compendium has more in common with the latter; far more miss than hit. Except for whatever reason, people not only like(d) it but, evidently, they paid money for it. Go figure. And just for the record, I'm generally loathe to criticize art work. I'm quite lacking in the fine motor skill department so I feel it a little disingenuous to criticize others for what I myself cannot do. However, the art here ranges from lack-luster, to mediocrity, and then back to lackluster again. With a few 3rd tier gems here and there, it all seems quite garish in retrospect. Yeah, yeah. "He was a high school student," you'll say. But irregardless, some of the visuals are just gross to look at. Not vile - just gross. Ew! Sure, no one is perfect. But, the stories are even more 3rd rate than the nasty-ass illustrations within. Blech! Never exceeding more than fix-six pages in length, the stories feel more like skits than anything. And as anyone who listened to more than a few Hip-Hop LP's, more often than not they do amount to filler. Except what would otherwise be filler here, is actually the main course. And to be charitable, sure there are a couple moments of charm but, they are unsurprisingly few and far between. After giving this a thorough once-over, I feel like Adrian Tomine's optic nerves were shot when he made this. Two Thumbs Down!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Shazia

    I'm very back and forth on what rating I would give this and I really wish I could just give it a 2.5 on Goodreads. I feel like a 2 star rating is just toooo loooowww and not at all how I felt about this book. However, I think the reason why I can't bring myself to give this a 3 is because a lot of the stories were just...okay? But then again there were a few that did get a reaction out of me. 'Solitary Enjoyment' was a good short comic that high school me would have loved (but I mean present I'm very back and forth on what rating I would give this and I really wish I could just give it a 2.5 on Goodreads. I feel like a 2 star rating is just toooo loooowww and not at all how I felt about this book. However, I think the reason why I can't bring myself to give this a 3 is because a lot of the stories were just...okay? But then again there were a few that did get a reaction out of me. 'Solitary Enjoyment' was a good short comic that high school me would have loved (but I mean present day me also really liked it). 'Rodney' was great, which made me think maybe I only like the comic strips that featured Amy. Then it turned out that there are strips with Amy that I didn't like. And of course I loved 'Smoke' and 'Happy Anniversary' because I thoroughly enjoy stories featuring dysfunctional couples. Oh and I really liked the strips that portrayed some of Tomine's dreams. So there were more than a few comics I liked but not enough that I can justify giving this a 3 star rating. But I don't feel too bad about the low rating because I am definitely going to check out more of Adrian Tomine's works! I just think his mini-comics are too short and there's not enough in each story for me to connect with.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Renee Alberts

    32 Stories collects the first several issues of Adrian Tomine’s long-running comic strip Optic Nerve. The selections are from the first strips Tomine initially photocopied and distributed himself, beginning at age 15. His artistic evolution serves as a subtext to the plots of the stories, as his clean-line style and poignant storytelling emerge. He depicts these characters with a delicate care to preserve the spirit of the muses who appeared to him in laundromats, coffee shops and dirty 32 Stories collects the first several issues of Adrian Tomine’s long-running comic strip Optic Nerve. The selections are from the first strips Tomine initially photocopied and distributed himself, beginning at age 15. His artistic evolution serves as a subtext to the plots of the stories, as his clean-line style and poignant storytelling emerge. He depicts these characters with a delicate care to preserve the spirit of the muses who appeared to him in laundromats, coffee shops and dirty apartments. The strongest stories are vignettes into the small triumphs and failures of everyday characters’ lives. A young insomniac describes the diners and bike rides that occupy her nights. A couple interrupts their anniversary with a conversation they’d rather not have. A woman mails a letter to her boyfriend, then regrets it. Several characters rebel against the frustrating conditions and coworkers of their minimum-wage jobs. Tomine finds these men and women at their least heroic, lying in bed rehearsing the witty comebacks they should have said, or recollecting anticlimactic, yet significant memories. His characters shoe-gaze and sport awkward haircuts and ill-fitting clothes. They smoke too much, think a lot, feel even more and say very little. The magic of Optic Nerve is that we’re included into their surreal dreams and absurd moments with an intimacy that allows us to smile in recognition as they laugh at themselves.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Keith

    Back around the time I was lagging through my last dangling college credit after 9/11, I got on an Adrian Tomine kick and thought I wanted to try making autobio comics. My life was definitely sad and meditative enough at the time to mirror any of Tomine's ouvre, but around the fourth panel on the first page I drew myself on top of a dinosaur, and that was about it for autobio comics. Tomine's flat and starkly realistic style is sort of bracing in its nonjudgmental immediacy, even if his Back around the time I was lagging through my last dangling college credit after 9/11, I got on an Adrian Tomine kick and thought I wanted to try making autobio comics. My life was definitely sad and meditative enough at the time to mirror any of Tomine's ouvre, but around the fourth panel on the first page I drew myself on top of a dinosaur, and that was about it for autobio comics. Tomine's flat and starkly realistic style is sort of bracing in its nonjudgmental immediacy, even if his characters wander through emotionally murky worlds of quiet gloom. Tomine's books are sort of frustrating because they're equal parts hipster fantasy and shocking truth. His short stories fascinate me, intimidate me and make me want to punch him in the face. Everyone should read him once.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Austin

    I picked this book up at Hungry Head Books in Eugene. (Is that place even still around?) As a kid raised on superheroes, indie-comics were completely unknown to me, and I had never read anything weirder that DC's Vertigo books. But there was something about what I saw that appealed to me, and I took it home anyway and read it through. I was instantly hooked. I started getting the Optic Nerve book that was coming out, and used to talk up Adrian Tomine whenever people asked what I was reading. I I picked this book up at Hungry Head Books in Eugene. (Is that place even still around?) As a kid raised on superheroes, indie-comics were completely unknown to me, and I had never read anything weirder that DC's Vertigo books. But there was something about what I saw that appealed to me, and I took it home anyway and read it through. I was instantly hooked. I started getting the Optic Nerve book that was coming out, and used to talk up Adrian Tomine whenever people asked what I was reading. I used to think that he was sharp, funny, and had a sense of timing that was impeccable, and I would re-read these 32 Stories, wringing out of them the emotion that seemed to be seeping out of every panel he drew. Time passed in it's singular motion, and I took another look at Tomine to check in with him and see if my friend-in-comics was still up to his old tricks. I was shocked to find that I didn't like it. I went back and re-read everything I owned, and found myself sort of grimacing and wondering why it was so depressing. It's not that his work is bad; far from it. He is a skilled cartoonist who can write and draw quite impressively, and more than once I've been impressed with little tricks and nuances that appear in his work. But it seems to me that the consistently dour tone of his stories, and the fact that they always focus on the worst moments of hipster relationships, is sort of like hitting the same note endlessly. I like a good drone as much as the next guy, but as I get older I don't want to wallow in this kind of storytelling, even if it's beautifully executed.

  6. 4 out of 5

    jess

    If you read other Tomine or you have appreciation for how storytellers develop, this is a collection not to be missed. Such a weirdly intimate, raw slice of life/lives (fiction and not).

  7. 5 out of 5

    Marc

    With the fancy-schmancy, single volume of this collection having gone out of print in the oughts, publisher Drawn & Quarterly talked Tomine into keeping this work in circulation. Despite his normal self-doubt and difficulty with self-promotion, he agreed on the condition the works be republished as they were originally. What you have is a box set of 7 "mini-comics"--essentially, the saddlestitched cardstock pamphlets, ranging from 10 to 16 pgs each, that Tomine originally self-published With the fancy-schmancy, single volume of this collection having gone out of print in the oughts, publisher Drawn & Quarterly talked Tomine into keeping this work in circulation. Despite his normal self-doubt and difficulty with self-promotion, he agreed on the condition the works be republished as they were originally. What you have is a box set of 7 "mini-comics"--essentially, the saddlestitched cardstock pamphlets, ranging from 10 to 16 pgs each, that Tomine originally self-published himself. There's an additional "pamphlet" with a foreword/intro by the artist and the publisher, as well as some unreleased artwork. It's always fascinating to see an artist's earlier work and it's kind of amazing to think he wrote, drew, produced, and distributed most of this work while in high school! You can see improvement/evolution from issue to issue and these are scattered with the seeds that grew into his later works (vignettes and short stories based in reality, autobiographical pieces, awkward social situations, a search for acceptance/love, left-field randomness complimented by increasingly sharper black and white line art, etc.). Even the short fan letters that appear at the back of each issue are entertaining. Probably not a collection I'd start with if you've never read Tomine, but well worth it if you're a fan or enjoy dipping into and out of social-observer type strips.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    There is nothing special about this, at all. And I really wanted to like it- b/c judging from the author pic (yes, I judge authors/everyone by their appearance- deal with it) and his introduction, he's an awesome guy. I kind of want to be friends with him, though it'd be kind of awkward, I think, when he turned one of our conversations into some lame comic and I'd have to pretend that it was good. Though, as some people pointed out, it's kind of cool to see how he's progressed. But as a whole, it There is nothing special about this, at all. And I really wanted to like it- b/c judging from the author pic (yes, I judge authors/everyone by their appearance- deal with it) and his introduction, he's an awesome guy. I kind of want to be friends with him, though it'd be kind of awkward, I think, when he turned one of our conversations into some lame comic and I'd have to pretend that it was good. Though, as some people pointed out, it's kind of cool to see how he's progressed. But as a whole, it was lacking. Also... his understanding/portrayal of human behavior, in a few of the comics, seems to be really... bad. He's clearly a very moral, upstanding young man. Which is fine, but hardly makes him qualified to talk about the way the horrors of shoplifting tear apart a relationship. B/c that seemed pretty ridiculous and contrived. Unless that was based on an actual experience, in which case I stand corrected, though I somehow doubt it. Anyway..a kind of half-assed effort, but it had its moments. I'd be open to reading more by this guy, if there is more, b/c I think he has great "potential" which sounds like an insult (and kind of is) but I mean it. Also.. this guy is from Sacramento. I still maintain that the only really impressive thing to come out of this city is Cake (the band). I was going to give it one star, but that's really not fair, it's like 100x better than The Da Vinci Code. Two stars.

  9. 4 out of 5

    pierce geary

    It is perfectly natural and understandable for an artist to be self conscious about their earliest work, and from the introduction to this edition you can tell that Adrian Tomine is among the most nervously trepid, but there is so much innate skill and mature vision in these comics that they hardly seem like the doodles of a distracted high schooler. He should be entirely proud of these. They're not perfect but they are precisely what they ought to be and most comics done by novices are a far It is perfectly natural and understandable for an artist to be self conscious about their earliest work, and from the introduction to this edition you can tell that Adrian Tomine is among the most nervously trepid, but there is so much innate skill and mature vision in these comics that they hardly seem like the doodles of a distracted high schooler. He should be entirely proud of these. They're not perfect but they are precisely what they ought to be and most comics done by novices are a far cry from even that. I love how you can see the precociousness of the artist and his learning trajectory through these seven little pamphlets. Each one is so brief but the incredible leaps in ability and precision with each progressive issue belie the relatively small output making me want to see all those sketches and comics Adrian must have kept all to himself as he honed his incredible talent. I mean look at his stuff now. He's a master.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kristoffer

    I've read this book so many times I've lost count, but what I noticed this time around is that Adrian Tomine has had multiple writing and drawing styles, and it was interesting to watch how he progressed from a self-published sixteen-year old comic artist and writer to a nineteen-year old one who received a contract from Drawn & Quarterly by the end of the Optic Nerve Mini-Comics series. Though I appreciated watching his growth as a writer, I found myself wishing that he retained some of his I've read this book so many times I've lost count, but what I noticed this time around is that Adrian Tomine has had multiple writing and drawing styles, and it was interesting to watch how he progressed from a self-published sixteen-year old comic artist and writer to a nineteen-year old one who received a contract from Drawn & Quarterly by the end of the Optic Nerve Mini-Comics series. Though I appreciated watching his growth as a writer, I found myself wishing that he retained some of his multiple drawing styles and employing them accordingly to this day, rather than remaining loyal to his current style, which is delinated in the stories "Happy Anniversary" and "Grind." "Two in the Morning" remains my favorite comic in the entire Tomine catalogue; I could read it several times in one sitting and still find so much satisfaction in it.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kirk

    I wouldn't recommend this collection unless you're either a big fan of self-produced comics (of which this box set is a facsimile of the originals) or a big fan of Tomine and eager to trace (or ink?) the development of his style. While I was initially drawn to Tomine's work by his clean black and white style, I've never been that interested in his characters, especially the autobiographical stories. Granted, this collection features a very young Tomine's work, and I guess that in that light it's I wouldn't recommend this collection unless you're either a big fan of self-produced comics (of which this box set is a facsimile of the originals) or a big fan of Tomine and eager to trace (or ink?) the development of his style. While I was initially drawn to Tomine's work by his clean black and white style, I've never been that interested in his characters, especially the autobiographical stories. Granted, this collection features a very young Tomine's work, and I guess that in that light it's good, but not something I, at 26, want to be reading. What I enjoyed most about this collection was seeing now-famous (for their medium) artists like Jason Lutes and James Kochalka, among others, writing in to Tomine and appearing on the Letters pages. And it was neat to read the comics in replicated form, with the original covers and letters and all that.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    The best thing about Adrian Tomine's earlier work is that it's so inspiring. You get to see him working from crude drawings done with sharpies and ball-point pens and then slowly refining his technique, learning to use brush and ink, learning to compose a panel, learning how to frame a scene. It's hard to believe this is the same guy who does the more current manifestation of Optic Nerve with its uber-sleek illustrative style. It gives me hope. Some of the stories in this are merely ok, but The best thing about Adrian Tomine's earlier work is that it's so inspiring. You get to see him working from crude drawings done with sharpies and ball-point pens and then slowly refining his technique, learning to use brush and ink, learning to compose a panel, learning how to frame a scene. It's hard to believe this is the same guy who does the more current manifestation of Optic Nerve with its uber-sleek illustrative style. It gives me hope. Some of the stories in this are merely ok, but there are one or two - like "Smoke" and the one where Tomine dreams of all barbers going on strike in the middle of his haircut - that I absolutely love. This is definitely worth reading for indie comics fans, and a must for anyone who aspires to create comics of their own.

  13. 4 out of 5

    g026r

    It's interesting to watch as Tomine's ability to both write and draw a story improves, and impressive in many regards for the young age at which he produced them. That aside, the majority of the stories contained within are ultimately slight and show the clear signs of the aforementioned young age of their artist at the time. An interesting historical document, and there are some real gems present, but it's really solely for those who are already fans. (The recent re-issue gets an extra plug for It's interesting to watch as Tomine's ability to both write and draw a story improves, and impressive in many regards for the young age at which he produced them. That aside, the majority of the stories contained within are ultimately slight and show the clear signs of the aforementioned young age of their artist at the time. An interesting historical document, and there are some real gems present, but it's really solely for those who are already fans. (The recent re-issue gets an extra plug for reprinting the comics in the exact format they originally appeared in, ads and all, making it even more of an interesting historical document.)

  14. 4 out of 5

    Adan

    There are some hits and misses in this collection of Tomine's earliest work, but what fascinated me the most was watching Tomine's progression as an artist and storyteller. He starts out quite raw and scratchy, but only seven issues later he proves how amazing he really is. My favorites are easily "Smoke" and "Happy Anniversary", both about relationships that should have ended long ago but don't because of inertia, complacency, and low self-esteem.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Eissenn Downey jr.

    Funny and sometimes haunting. This is Raymond Carver in comics form.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Tomine gets a full 5 stars from me not because of the content, but because of all the love and madness that went into putting ON together.

  17. 5 out of 5

    val

    "What is the point?" I asked myself as I read the first two issues. But then, maybe this is me being used to conventional media where you can expect there to be some neat pay-off to a carefully crafted story. The comics were made in the 90s by a then-high-school student, before the age of information, before anyone could easily learn that a story is composed of exposition followed by the rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution (unless they paid attention in class). And, these were "What is the point?" I asked myself as I read the first two issues. But then, maybe this is me being used to conventional media where you can expect there to be some neat pay-off to a carefully crafted story. The comics were made in the 90s by a then-high-school student, before the age of information, before anyone could easily learn that a story is composed of exposition followed by the rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution (unless they paid attention in class). And, these were strips originally meant for Tomine's eyes. The third issue starts showing a resemblance to conventional story structure, being most evident in "Adrian Quits His Job," where I also started to appreciate Tomine's skills at drawing intense expressions and movement. My favorite story in this issue though had to be "Rodney" for its slice-of-life element and life goes on mentality. The fourth issue shows dramatic improvement with even more polished storytelling, and the content improves from there. I feel like "Haircut" is the best in the whole collection, since it comes entirely from a dream that goes from mundane to possibly despairing. I enjoyed the collection, although I'm not sure I would read it again except for a select few strips.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Stories are so-so. You can see potential, but Tomine's really not that good yet in these early comics. What I do love, however, is the format of the new edition. Tomine agrees that these stories aren't quite ready for public consumption, but rather than try to hide them, he chose to reformat 32 Stories. The earlier book-edition is out of print, replaced by this new version: a small box with seven replica editions of the actual mini-comics, which enforces these stories as relics of their time. Stories are so-so. You can see potential, but Tomine's really not that good yet in these early comics. What I do love, however, is the format of the new edition. Tomine agrees that these stories aren't quite ready for public consumption, but rather than try to hide them, he chose to reformat 32 Stories. The earlier book-edition is out of print, replaced by this new version: a small box with seven replica editions of the actual mini-comics, which enforces these stories as relics of their time. It's a great package, with a new mini-comic of introductory material written (in prose, no comics here) by Tomine and publisher Chris Oliveros.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sheryl

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I'm glad to have started in Tomine's very first comic series. Seeing how he wrote this in high school, he was indeed living in his own bubble and I understand how this could definitely feel relate-able. "Train I Ride" may be what resonated with me the most. I appreciate his gradual progression to a cleaner look and I am quite curious how his current work is like. 2017 Around the Year in 52 books: A category from another challenge - 8/52 (This completes the Booktubeathon Challenge: Finish a book I'm glad to have started in Tomine's very first comic series. Seeing how he wrote this in high school, he was indeed living in his own bubble and I understand how this could definitely feel relate-able. "Train I Ride" may be what resonated with me the most. I appreciate his gradual progression to a cleaner look and I am quite curious how his current work is like. 2017 Around the Year in 52 books: A category from another challenge - 8/52 (This completes the Booktubeathon Challenge: Finish a book in one day)

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jason Bootle

    Let's face it, the author is annoying and I remember I had read one of his more recent novels and I just couldn't like anything about his main character. Way too self obsessed. Having said that, what I did like was the format, a republishing of his original self published zines in a box. Nice. Some of the strips were good – the ones which didn't feature him! – and it was nice to see the development of an artist – the guy can certainly draw and perhaps mimics Clowes a bit much but nonetheless Let's face it, the author is annoying and I remember I had read one of his more recent novels and I just couldn't like anything about his main character. Way too self obsessed. Having said that, what I did like was the format, a republishing of his original self published zines in a box. Nice. Some of the strips were good – the ones which didn't feature him! – and it was nice to see the development of an artist – the guy can certainly draw and perhaps mimics Clowes a bit much but nonetheless nice to see that development. 2 stars for content, 1 for packaging and presentation.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lucile Barker

    81. 32 Stories: The complete Optic Nerve Mini Comics by Adrian Tomine I found these to be a great little stories but the art was a little primitive. The emotions were as raw as the drawings. Men jealous off anything their women like, nightmares, insomnia. Many of the vignettes were inspired by dreams. While I could relate to all of them, I hope Tomine either improves his art, or tries fiction.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Emi Bevacqua

    I like watching Adrian Tomine's style evolve over the course of these 32 stories, spanning 5 years of experimentation with his subjects, their genders and backgrounds. I found some of this stuff too cringe-y to enjoy though, it's so raw and he's so vulnerable.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    "Solitary Enjoyment" is the most insightful look into the human condition I've seen a 17-year-old produce. The rest of this collection is just as wonderful and kind of makes me nostalgic for a time when DIY creative culture wasn't as hegemonized by the mainstream as much as it is now.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Craig

    This stroll found modern angst unresolved yet skirting unrepentant borders in lands promising pleasure.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dina Rahajaharison

    'But every once i a while, I miss that bitter reject I used to hang out with.'

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sooraya Evans

    Pretty embarrassing to have made this into printed form. Undeniably, the art does get progressively better as you flip through the pages. This book is probably only meaningful if you’re a true fan.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Francis

    You can see there's something great there. It is still at the development stage, but it will bloom.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Punkie

    2 1/2 stars

  29. 4 out of 5

    Agroca AWOL

    This book is very excellent.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sonaksha

    Love Adrian Tomine’s work and it was so lovely to be able to peek into his initial work. An artist is always conscious of their early work, but to be able to see it and mark the growth and evolution is absolutely wonderful, to say the least. Loved the experimentation with the drawing style, the panels, the characters and the compilation of stories. Felt like the glimpse of a journal, where there’s so much to learn about where it began. From dark sharpie scribbles that you have to scramble Love Adrian Tomine’s work and it was so lovely to be able to peek into his initial work. An artist is always conscious of their early work, but to be able to see it and mark the growth and evolution is absolutely wonderful, to say the least. Loved the experimentation with the drawing style, the panels, the characters and the compilation of stories. Felt like the glimpse of a journal, where there’s so much to learn about where it began. From dark sharpie scribbles that you have to scramble through to detailed ball point drawings - also really enjoyed the banality of some of the conversations, yet the ability to make them so interesting. As you can probably tell, I’m a huge Adrian Tomine fan and this collection is definitely a must read for anyone who is.

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