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The Poetry of Robert Frost (Collected Poems, Complete & Unabridged)

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The only comprehensive gathering of Frost's published poetry, this affordable volume offers the entire contents of his eleven books of verse, from A Boy's Will (1913) to In the Clearing (1962). Frost scholar Lathem, who was also a close friend of the four-time Pulitzer Prize-winner, scrupulously annotated the 350-plus poems in this collection, which has been the standard e The only comprehensive gathering of Frost's published poetry, this affordable volume offers the entire contents of his eleven books of verse, from A Boy's Will (1913) to In the Clearing (1962). Frost scholar Lathem, who was also a close friend of the four-time Pulitzer Prize-winner, scrupulously annotated the 350-plus poems in this collection, which has been the standard edition of Frost's work since it first appeared in 1969.


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The only comprehensive gathering of Frost's published poetry, this affordable volume offers the entire contents of his eleven books of verse, from A Boy's Will (1913) to In the Clearing (1962). Frost scholar Lathem, who was also a close friend of the four-time Pulitzer Prize-winner, scrupulously annotated the 350-plus poems in this collection, which has been the standard e The only comprehensive gathering of Frost's published poetry, this affordable volume offers the entire contents of his eleven books of verse, from A Boy's Will (1913) to In the Clearing (1962). Frost scholar Lathem, who was also a close friend of the four-time Pulitzer Prize-winner, scrupulously annotated the 350-plus poems in this collection, which has been the standard edition of Frost's work since it first appeared in 1969.

30 review for The Poetry of Robert Frost (Collected Poems, Complete & Unabridged)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lena

    Some say the world will end in fire, Some say in ice. From what I've tasted of desire I hold with those who favor fire. But if it had to perish twice, I think I know enough of hate To say that for destruction ice Is also great And would suffice. Robert Frost was a genius.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    It's not that I have a favourite Robert Frost poem -- he's not that kind of fellow. Yes, there are many "quotable quotes" that people bandy about; but again, he's not that kind of fellow. I dip into this collection again and again, when I want the world to slow down a little, and I just want to dream away a few hours, an afternoon. These are especially good on snowy, blustery, mid-winter afternoons when there is nothing to do, and nowhere to go. And in the evening, you stop by a wood, ... lovely It's not that I have a favourite Robert Frost poem -- he's not that kind of fellow. Yes, there are many "quotable quotes" that people bandy about; but again, he's not that kind of fellow. I dip into this collection again and again, when I want the world to slow down a little, and I just want to dream away a few hours, an afternoon. These are especially good on snowy, blustery, mid-winter afternoons when there is nothing to do, and nowhere to go. And in the evening, you stop by a wood, ... lovely, dark, and deep. He's the kind of fellow with whom you could have had long, interesting conversations, whether or not the discourse took you anywhere on that particular day; but to never make the mistake, in that conversation, of confusing his simplicity of language with simplicity of thought -- for he is more than "a considerable speck" in the universe and he has allowed me to take many roads, in my mind, not taken in the physical world. This is a well-thumbed, well-loved collection.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ted

    I'm currently working my way through this book, which is the standard edition of his collected poetry. Should be done some time in 2018. Frost in 1941 Below are the nine collections of poetry the book contains, the year the collection was published, and links to separate reviews of the collections, for those I've read and reviewed. These reviews will primarily be comprised of quotations of some of the poems I enjoyed most, with perhaps some additional comments. (1) A Boy's Will, 1913 - review (2) No I'm currently working my way through this book, which is the standard edition of his collected poetry. Should be done some time in 2018. Frost in 1941 Below are the nine collections of poetry the book contains, the year the collection was published, and links to separate reviews of the collections, for those I've read and reviewed. These reviews will primarily be comprised of quotations of some of the poems I enjoyed most, with perhaps some additional comments. (1) A Boy's Will, 1913 - review (2) North of Boston, 1914 - review (3) Mountain Interval, 1916 - review (4) New Hampshire, 1924 - (5) West-Running Brook, 1929 (6) A Further Range, 1936 (7) A Witness Tree, 1942 (8) Steeple Bush, 1947 (9) In the Clearing, 1962 The book also contains two plays Frost wrote: (10) A Masque of Reason, 1945 (11) A Masque of Mercy, 1947 Finally (not in the book), I've reviewed the following: Robert Frost: A Collection of Critical Essays, edited by James M. Cox. See the link for Previous library review below. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Previous review: Basil Street Blues Next review: North of Boston Older review: Understanding Power Previous library review: Robert Frost critical reviews Next library review: A Boy's Will see above

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jan-Maat

    I was intrigued to learn that Frost and Edward Thomas had met and spent time together in England before the first world war following on from a review of some of Frost's poetry by Thomas. I feel both that in some way that the two of these people are now coming together in my understanding is a sign both of the deficiencies in my education and that luckily there is ever more to discover about the world. I believe "The Road not taken" was inspired by some of the walks the two went on and that Fro I was intrigued to learn that Frost and Edward Thomas had met and spent time together in England before the first world war following on from a review of some of Frost's poetry by Thomas. I feel both that in some way that the two of these people are now coming together in my understanding is a sign both of the deficiencies in my education and that luckily there is ever more to discover about the world. I believe "The Road not taken" was inspired by some of the walks the two went on and that Frost encouraged Thomas to write and publish his own poetry too. There is something unnerving about that connection for me, perhaps just the sense of how long Frost's adult life was since he was also performing at the inauguration (view spoiler)[ there's a lovely Roman word carrying the ideology of an alien world into modern times (hide spoiler)] of J.F. Kennedy. I recall a verse about almost being carried off by an eagle as a child which has then that reoccurring theme in poetry of the writer's self identity as poet, but also their own place in their culture. Frost not becoming Ganymede stands in relation to Petrarch and his Laura evoking the laurel which crowns the poet's brow as symbol of the Muse's victory. Although the volume, no doubt cheaply acquired, stands on the shelf I doubt I'll become deeply acquainted with it. Poetry for me has the feel of hard work to it, I am a lazy reader, disinclined to break my head over ambiguous phrasing and elusive meaning.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Grey853

    Robert Frost wrote some stunning and thought provoking poems. Almost everyone has heard of "Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening" or "The Road Not Taken", but one of my all time favorites is "Desert Places". The last verse: "They cannot scare me with their empty spaces Between stars--on stars where no human race is. I have it in me so much nearer home To scare myself with my own desert places."

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jody

    I think it's this version I have an old copy of this book. My grandma gave it to me for Christmas many years ago. I love Robert Frost. He's my first favorite poet and my favorite poem will always be The Road Not Taken. "And I, I took the road less traveled by and that has made all the difference." RF is my reason for loving words I think.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Robert Frost has the most beautiful poetry! My dad used to read to me from this book every night before bed and it has been a fovorite ever since. When I was little my favorite one was The pasture. Now I love "Reluctance" OUT through the fields and the woods And over the walls I have wended; I have climbed the hills of view And looked at the world, and descended; I have come by the highway home, 5 And lo, it is ended. The leaves are all dead on the ground, Save those that the oak is keeping Robert Frost has the most beautiful poetry! My dad used to read to me from this book every night before bed and it has been a fovorite ever since. When I was little my favorite one was The pasture. Now I love "Reluctance" OUT through the fields and the woods And over the walls I have wended; I have climbed the hills of view And looked at the world, and descended; I have come by the highway home, 5 And lo, it is ended. The leaves are all dead on the ground, Save those that the oak is keeping To ravel them one by one And let them go scraping and creeping 10 Out over the crusted snow, When others are sleeping. And the dead leaves lie huddled and still, No longer blown hither and thither; The last lone aster is gone; 15 The flowers of the witch-hazel wither; The heart is still aching to seek, But the feet question ‘Whither?’ Ah, when to the heart of man Was it ever less than a treason 20 To go with the drift of things, To yield with a grace to reason, And bow and accept the end Of a love or a season?

  8. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Oh, if there were only the words to express how I feel about Frost. There aren't the right words nor near enough. However, I do enjoy reading his poems. They buoy me. I am usually a lover of short poems, yet, even in his longer poems a line or two will reverberate. Most will recommend "Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening", "The Road Not Taken" or "Nothing Gold Can Stay". There are reasons why they would recommend these poems, as they have merit. Yet, these are not the only poems worth their keep Oh, if there were only the words to express how I feel about Frost. There aren't the right words nor near enough. However, I do enjoy reading his poems. They buoy me. I am usually a lover of short poems, yet, even in his longer poems a line or two will reverberate. Most will recommend "Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening", "The Road Not Taken" or "Nothing Gold Can Stay". There are reasons why they would recommend these poems, as they have merit. Yet, these are not the only poems worth their keep. I recommend reading "Reluctance", "Into My Own", "Tree At My Window", "Wild Grapes" and "Devotion". I may yet live, as I know others live, To wish in vain to let go with the mind - Of cares, at night, to sleep; but nothing tells me That I need learn to let go with the heart. from "Wild Grapes"

  9. 4 out of 5

    Leona Carstairs

    Yay, I did manage to finish it this weekend. I feel so accomplished. =) Okay fine, I didn't 100% finish it. I skipped those two 20 page poems that were like about bible people?? And completely dialogue?? Bc let's face it, what? Why would I care about that? But it does count as "read" ok, IT COUNTS. I read 95% of it, hell yes it counts. Overall I fucking hated the poems that were like 13 pages long. I couldn't stand them! But the shorter poems were really beautiful, but THE LONG ONES JUST KIND OF Yay, I did manage to finish it this weekend. I feel so accomplished. =) Okay fine, I didn't 100% finish it. I skipped those two 20 page poems that were like about bible people?? And completely dialogue?? Bc let's face it, what? Why would I care about that? But it does count as "read" ok, IT COUNTS. I read 95% of it, hell yes it counts. Overall I fucking hated the poems that were like 13 pages long. I couldn't stand them! But the shorter poems were really beautiful, but THE LONG ONES JUST KIND OF RUINED MY EXPERIENCE A BIT. But also the short ones were nice and pretty and well done, so I have sort of kind of maybe mixed feelings.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    He expertly articulates and captures those feelings inspired in us as children. Wonderment and Beauty, Innocence, and Joyfulness, but also and equally, Loneliness Isolation and Desperation. Wisdom and Naivety. Reading Frost is like traveling across New England With two people. The First incarnation a small enthusiastic and expressive child awe struck by the simple beauty of the landscape and changing seasons as he passes them by yearning to run ahead and spy what lay beyond the next bend. The Seco He expertly articulates and captures those feelings inspired in us as children. Wonderment and Beauty, Innocence, and Joyfulness, but also and equally, Loneliness Isolation and Desperation. Wisdom and Naivety. Reading Frost is like traveling across New England With two people. The First incarnation a small enthusiastic and expressive child awe struck by the simple beauty of the landscape and changing seasons as he passes them by yearning to run ahead and spy what lay beyond the next bend. The Second, a wiser and well traveled grandfatherly type, Who knows better than to openly advise against taking the short cut,though in a round about way counsels against the idea; lest we miss the point of the taking the back roads in the first place. (If the above was confusing I apologize. Its late and Im trying to pay homage my favorite philosopher/poet. I find Its like trying to explain why water tastes good when you've just crossed the Sahara. It should be obvious to all, but then what if the person has no idea what the Sahara IS?

  11. 5 out of 5

    Charles

    My November Guest My Sorrow, when she's here with me, Thinks these dark days of autumn rain Are beautiful as days can be; She loves the bare, the withered tree; She walks the sodden pasture lane. Her pleasure will not let me stay. She talks and I am fain to list: She's glad the birds are gone away, She's glad her simple worsted grey Is silver now with clinging mist. The desolate, deserted trees, The faded earth, the heavy sky, The beauties she so truly sees, She thinks I have no eye for these, And vexes me for My November Guest My Sorrow, when she's here with me, Thinks these dark days of autumn rain Are beautiful as days can be; She loves the bare, the withered tree; She walks the sodden pasture lane. Her pleasure will not let me stay. She talks and I am fain to list: She's glad the birds are gone away, She's glad her simple worsted grey Is silver now with clinging mist. The desolate, deserted trees, The faded earth, the heavy sky, The beauties she so truly sees, She thinks I have no eye for these, And vexes me for reason why. Not yesterday I learned to know The love of bare November days Before the coming of the snow, But it were vain to tell her so, And they are better for her praise.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Timothy Muller

    It may seem strange to allot only four stars to such a great poet. However, for me, there are (more or less) two Frosts. Actually, there are three Frosts, but the third is not a very important consideration. To take the third first, this is the Frost of lighter, often satirical poetry, as in, for example “A Case for Jefferson.” This kind of verse is not really Frost’s strong suit and I think his reputation might rest a little higher had he not published it. However, virtually all poets publish ma It may seem strange to allot only four stars to such a great poet. However, for me, there are (more or less) two Frosts. Actually, there are three Frosts, but the third is not a very important consideration. To take the third first, this is the Frost of lighter, often satirical poetry, as in, for example “A Case for Jefferson.” This kind of verse is not really Frost’s strong suit and I think his reputation might rest a little higher had he not published it. However, virtually all poets publish material not quite worthy of them and few readers hold that against them. More typically though, Frost has two modes of writing: 1) rhymed verse with tauter rhythms, and 2) the generally much looser blank verse. I often like the first very much; indeed consider the best of his lyrics to be among the finest lyrical poetry in the language. There are very few poets to have written so many lyrics of such high quality. For the second mode, the blank verse (usually, not always) I can find very little affection. It is important to note that in the first type (the rhymed verse as a opposed to the looser blank verse) is often symbolic, using harvest, night, sea, woodland paths, and other symbols to suggest larger (if vaguer) meaning. The blank verse is often quite literal. Poems like “Death of a Hired Hand” or “Home Burial” read more like short stories than poetry. And the blank verse lines, drifting so often from the strict iambic pentameter, lines do not gather energy. Blank verse is a very difficult medium for poetry in English. One must be extremely gifted to use it. Only Shakespeare’s and Tennyson’s really work for me, and these are two of the very best at handling the English language. Frost (along with Wordsworth e.g.) fails to bring it to life for me. To illustrate, I will contrast two poems - “Home Burial” and “Acquainted with the Night.” Both are very dark poems. First “Home Burial:” The poem involves the misunderstandings between a husband and wife following the death and burial (by the husband) of their child. I think that we have to admit that we are involved with two pretty dense people. The emotion is not nuanced; it is raw and even simplistic. Take the following where the husband finally realizes that his child’s burial mound can be seen from a window at which his wife has been seen looking out numerous times: “‘The wonder is I didn’t see at once. I never noticed it from here before. I must be wonted to it—that’s the reason. The little graveyard where my people are! So small the window frames the whole of it.”’ A husband who does not know that his child’s grave can be seen from one of the home’s windows is not credible - it really isn’t; the wife’s apprehension of things is hardly better: “‘I can repeat the very words you were saying: “Three foggy mornings and one rainy day Will rot the best birch fence a man can build.” Think of it, talk like that at such a time! What had how long it takes a birch to rot To do with what was in the darkened parlor? You couldn’t care!’” She cannot understand that the unfortunate and pressing business of life goes on, that we cannot, in the normal course of events, stop to give things, including grief, their proper due. This is little more believable than her husbands obtuseness. Painful and absurd as this seems, intelligent women understand it. Nor can she grasp that the husband’s mourning goes on at a different level from her own. And the situation is too specific. Unless own happens to have had the same experience, we tend to remain uninvolved; we are placed in an uncomfortable voyeuristic position. I cannot but feel that this is closer to soap opera than poetry. In addition, the lines in “Home Burial” so often deviate from the normative iambic pentameter that in my perception it is really not poetry at all. And when the meter returns to the strict iambic pentameter, is often feels forced and sometimes awkward. Frost is sometimes credited with having broken down the meter as a sort of analogy to the breaking down of the communication of husband and wife; but if the crumbling of communication means crumbling of prosody, then what we have is prose. On the other hand “Acquainted with the Night” is a true work of art and a poem to which almost anyone can relate because it is communicated symbolically. There are none but the very fortunate and the self deluding sentimentalist who are not acquainted with the “night.” Here are the last three stanzas of the poem: “I have stood still and stopped the sound of feet When far away an interrupted cry Came over houses from another street, But not to call me back or say good-bye; And further still at an unearthly height, One luminary clock against the sky Proclaimed the time was neither wrong nor right. I have been one acquainted with the night.” The “night” is almost psychotically bleak. A cry is heard from streets away - is it real or an hallucination? in any case it’s terrifyingly hostile. The clock, normatively a helpful product of a coherent society is of no use; instead it is apparently a sinister, glaring eye. Any yet (and I consider this very important) the rhyme and controlled meter stand for coherence and meaning in which even the darkest place has a context, has a place in the scheme of things. There is a reason for the expression “neither rhyme nor reason.” Here we have rhyme (and more generally a prosody) which functions as a stand-in for reason, which however unavailable in the midst of the torment, is nevertheless insisted upon (albeit indirectly) by the poet. This is something poetry can do, that is, placing life’s varied and confusing events in some sort of context; indeed, it is one of its major functions, and Frost does it very well. The symbolic, as opposed to literal, representation allows for reverberating meaning and multiple context. To take one more brief example of what Frost does so well - from “A Prayer in Spring:” “Oh, give us pleasure in the flowers to-day; And give us not to think so far away As the uncertain harvest; keep us here All simply in the springing of the year.” How simple and unassuming is the verse at a literal level; yet how rich, replete with meaning, hopeful and ominous at once.

  13. 5 out of 5

    s.penkevich

    Robert Frost is the Thomas Kinkade of poetry.

  14. 5 out of 5

    LJ

    I've loved Frost's poems for years. "Birches," "A Road Not Taken," a version of which I've sung, "Time to Talk," are just a few of my favorites.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Asha Seth

    An anthology of Frost's best poems. My favorite among all: In A Disused Graveyard The living come with grassy tread To read the gravestones on the hill; The graveyard draws the living still, But never anymore the dead. The verses in it say and say: “The ones who living come today To read the stones and go away Tomorrow dead will come to stay.” So sure of death the marbles rhyme, Yet can’t help marking all the time How no one dead will seem to come. What is it men are shrinking from? It would be easy to be cle An anthology of Frost's best poems. My favorite among all: In A Disused Graveyard The living come with grassy tread To read the gravestones on the hill; The graveyard draws the living still, But never anymore the dead. The verses in it say and say: “The ones who living come today To read the stones and go away Tomorrow dead will come to stay.” So sure of death the marbles rhyme, Yet can’t help marking all the time How no one dead will seem to come. What is it men are shrinking from? It would be easy to be clever And tell the stones: Men hate to die And have stopped dying now forever. I think they would believe the lie.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jack Wolf

    "Two roads diverged in a wood, and I— I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference." Ah those classic lines are music to my ears

  17. 5 out of 5

    Illiterate

    Frost grapples with modernist doubts and looming meaninglessness even as he pursues the romantic project of opening poetry to everyday language.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Vicky Hunt

    Beautifully performed masterpieces! (I read the Audible and Kindle version) It was. a pleasure to discover more of the lovely poetry of one of my favorite poets. I'd memorized "Stopping by Woods" in grade school. I'd no idea what waited hidden among the rest. The Hired Man, The Impulse, and so many more jewels like hidden treasure saved for a later time in my life. Maybe I'd not have appreciated them as much as a child. But, many will certainly move you to tears. My favorite was probably "In the Ho Beautifully performed masterpieces! (I read the Audible and Kindle version) It was. a pleasure to discover more of the lovely poetry of one of my favorite poets. I'd memorized "Stopping by Woods" in grade school. I'd no idea what waited hidden among the rest. The Hired Man, The Impulse, and so many more jewels like hidden treasure saved for a later time in my life. Maybe I'd not have appreciated them as much as a child. But, many will certainly move you to tears. My favorite was probably "In the Homestretch." It is a sweet story of an older couple who get a place out in the country, following their lifelong dream of living on a farm. All their belongings are in boxes and have been piled around the house. Chairs are upside down in chairs. And, as grown relatives leave them to their happiness, the man and woman talk back and forth about their dreams and their life together. It is very beautiful and heart-warming, about the joy of growing old together. I've included the last third of the poem below. "It’s nothing; it’s their leaving us at dusk. I never bore it well when people went. The first night after guests have gone, the house Seems haunted or exposed. I always take A personal interest in the locking up At bedtime; but the strangeness soon wears off.” He fetched a dingy lantern from behind A door. “There’s that we didn’t lose! And these!”— Some matches he unpocketed. “For food— The meals we’ve had no one can take from us. I wish that everything on earth were just As certain as the meals we’ve had. I wish The meals we haven’t had were, anyway. What have you you know where to lay your hands on?” “The bread we bought in passing at the store. There’s butter somewhere, too.” “Let’s rend the bread. I’ll light the fire for company for you; You’ll not have any other company Till Ed begins to get out on a Sunday To look us over and give us his idea Of what wants pruning, shingling, breaking up. He’ll know what he would do if he were we, And all at once. He’ll plan for us and plan To help us, but he’ll take it out in planning. Well, you can set the table with the loaf. Let’s see you find your loaf. I’ll light the fire. I like chairs occupying other chairs Not offering a lady—” “There again, Joe! You’re tired.” “I’m drunk-nonsensical tired out; Don’t mind a word I say. It’s a day’s work To empty one house of all household goods And fill another with ’em fifteen miles away, Although you do no more than dump them down.” “Dumped down in paradise we are and happy.” “It’s all so much what I have always wanted, I can’t believe it’s what you wanted, too.” “Shouldn’t you like to know?” “I’d like to know If it is what you wanted, then how much You wanted it for me.” “A troubled conscience! You don’t want me to tell if I don’t know.” “I don’t want to find out what can’t be known. But who first said the word to come?” “My dear, It’s who first thought the thought. You’re searching, Joe, For things that don’t exist; I mean beginnings. Ends and beginnings—there are no such things. There are only middles.” “What is this?” “This life? Our sitting here by lantern-light together Amid the wreckage of a former home? You won’t deny the lantern isn’t new. The stove is not, and you are not to me, Nor I to you.” “Perhaps you never were?” “It would take me forever to recite All that’s not new in where we find ourselves. New is a word for fools in towns who think Style upon style in dress and thought at last Must get somewhere. I’ve heard you say as much. No, this is no beginning.” “Then an end?” “End is a gloomy word.” “Is it too late To drag you out for just a good-night call On the old peach trees on the knoll to grope By starlight in the grass for a last peach The neighbors may not have taken as their right When the house wasn’t lived in? I’ve been looking: I doubt if they have left us many grapes. Before we set ourselves to right the house, The first thing in the morning, out we go To go the round of apple, cherry, peach, Pine, alder, pasture, mowing, well, and brook. All of a farm it is.” “I know this much: I’m going to put you in your bed, if first I have to make you build it. Come, the light.” When there was no more lantern in the kitchen, The fire got out through crannies in the stove And danced in yellow wrigglers on the ceiling, As much at home as if they’d always danced there."

  19. 5 out of 5

    Madeline

    I liked Robert Frost a lot more when I thought he was just writing about farms, and taking nice walks, and stopping in various wooded areas on nights of inclement weather. After three class discussions of his poems, I am dismayed to learn that it's all a hell of a lot more complicated than that. Dammit. But he's nice when I don't have to worry about the deep philosophical meaning of birches and can just enjoy the nice comfortable feeling his poems give me. Here, have a random excerpt. From "Birch I liked Robert Frost a lot more when I thought he was just writing about farms, and taking nice walks, and stopping in various wooded areas on nights of inclement weather. After three class discussions of his poems, I am dismayed to learn that it's all a hell of a lot more complicated than that. Dammit. But he's nice when I don't have to worry about the deep philosophical meaning of birches and can just enjoy the nice comfortable feeling his poems give me. Here, have a random excerpt. From "Birches": "I'd like to get away from earth awhile And then come back to it and begin over. May no fate willfully misunderstand me And half grant what I wish and snatch me away Not to return. Earth's the right place for love: I don't know where it's likely to go better." Read for: Modern Poetry

  20. 4 out of 5

    E

    Lines from Frost seem to stick in my mind forever since studying him in high school and college and graduate school. And one of my favorite of his poems is "The Death of the Hired Man," which is about work, family, compassion, forgiveness, and home. When Warren and Mary disagree about the definition of "home," it is the second definition of home below (Mary's) that always brings tears to my eyes. " 'Home is the place where, when you have to go there,/ They have to take you in.’/ ‘I should have ca Lines from Frost seem to stick in my mind forever since studying him in high school and college and graduate school. And one of my favorite of his poems is "The Death of the Hired Man," which is about work, family, compassion, forgiveness, and home. When Warren and Mary disagree about the definition of "home," it is the second definition of home below (Mary's) that always brings tears to my eyes. " 'Home is the place where, when you have to go there,/ They have to take you in.’/ ‘I should have called it/ Something you somehow haven’t to deserve.’ " Images from this poem are also so Frost-sharp: "Part of a moon was falling down the west,/ Dragging the whole sky with it to the hills./ Its light poured softly in her lap. She saw it/ And spread her apron to it." Somehow, the older I get and the more I have lived, the more Frost gives to me.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Marit.W15

    It wasn't my favorite Poetry book i have read! But it wasn't to bad.

  22. 5 out of 5

    J.Aleksandr Wootton

    Beauty and genius have rarely drawn so light a veil across the face of joy and hollow of darkness as with the pen of Robert Frost.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Destiny Justus

    There are numerous poems throughout this book by Robert Frost. The stories the poems create are simple and understandable. Even the longer poems that spread over a few pages are easy to get through if you want to. My favorite poem in the book is "Leaves compared with Flowers." It was memorable and I had once had it memorized. Works like these bring meaning to poems and cause me personally to want to read more.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Leila

    If you like poetry don't miss this!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jay Schutt

    I had hoped to enjoy this collection more than I did. I guess I just didn't get what Frost was saying some of the time. There are still many enjoyable poems here.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Cara

    While striking, unique, scattered with profound verse, I just couldn't jive with you Mr. Frost. I flipped through this book, because honestly I'm not going to read 600 pages of random Robert Frost. So, I started by just checking out all the classic Frost poems from: "The Road Not Taken", "Fire and Ice", "Dust of Snow", to "Birches". They are pretty. I actually enjoyed a few of them, thought they were unique and beautiful, especially, "Death of a Hired Man" and "A Considerable Speck". I learned t While striking, unique, scattered with profound verse, I just couldn't jive with you Mr. Frost. I flipped through this book, because honestly I'm not going to read 600 pages of random Robert Frost. So, I started by just checking out all the classic Frost poems from: "The Road Not Taken", "Fire and Ice", "Dust of Snow", to "Birches". They are pretty. I actually enjoyed a few of them, thought they were unique and beautiful, especially, "Death of a Hired Man" and "A Considerable Speck". I learned two things while reading through these...where hipsters get excepts of their tattoos from and I'm not a huge fan of the poetry of Robert Frost, but I do find the man himself rather interesting. *Not to say while reading I didn't run into a few poems that reached out to me, I just can't justify a few poems or a line here or there as classifying myself as a Frost Fan. I get it though.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Judy

    A wonderful collection of Robert Frost's poetry and 2 plays. In hindsight, I wish I would have kept a running list of the poems I loved the most. Of course,The Road Not Taken would be right up there among the best. One of his later poems I enjoyed was The Milky Way is a Cowpath. I love Frost's sense of humor; he never seems to take himself (or anything) too seriously compared to some poets. He never seems to be overwrought about any subject which makes his work easier to relax with. I prefer his A wonderful collection of Robert Frost's poetry and 2 plays. In hindsight, I wish I would have kept a running list of the poems I loved the most. Of course,The Road Not Taken would be right up there among the best. One of his later poems I enjoyed was The Milky Way is a Cowpath. I love Frost's sense of humor; he never seems to take himself (or anything) too seriously compared to some poets. He never seems to be overwrought about any subject which makes his work easier to relax with. I prefer his rhyming poetry to his free verse. Then again, I prefer rhyming to free verse for any poet. I don't care for Frost's plays. He officially is my new,favorite poet. I look forward to reading more poetry when I get caught up with some of my backlog of reading.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    The Poetry of Robert Frost is the entirety of the great American poet’s published work, an authoritative volume that is structured to show his progression from his earliest work to his last—with a little exception at the end. However for those who have only read Frost in school, like me, you will be in for a surprise because the poems in English and/or Literature class are a deceptive selection of his complete works. While this complete book of Robert Frost’s work is wonderful for poetry enthusi The Poetry of Robert Frost is the entirety of the great American poet’s published work, an authoritative volume that is structured to show his progression from his earliest work to his last—with a little exception at the end. However for those who have only read Frost in school, like me, you will be in for a surprise because the poems in English and/or Literature class are a deceptive selection of his complete works. While this complete book of Robert Frost’s work is wonderful for poetry enthusiasts, for the more general reader I would suggest you look through this volume and decide if you want a smaller, more select volume of his work.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    Whose woods these are...I think I know, His house is in the village though He will not mind me stopping here to watch his woods fill up with snow my little horse must think it queer to stop without a farmhouse near between the woods and frozen lake the darkest evening of the year. When I had to memorize Frost in High School, little did I know how thankful I would be to carry these words with me wherever I go. Hopefully, my students feel the same way after they labored to memorize the poems I assigned. If Whose woods these are...I think I know, His house is in the village though He will not mind me stopping here to watch his woods fill up with snow my little horse must think it queer to stop without a farmhouse near between the woods and frozen lake the darkest evening of the year. When I had to memorize Frost in High School, little did I know how thankful I would be to carry these words with me wherever I go. Hopefully, my students feel the same way after they labored to memorize the poems I assigned. If you cherish the natural spaces, then you must love Robert Frost.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kent

    Perhaps I am just not a poetry guy. I enjoyed very few of this collection. I liked only slightly more than that, and actually understood only a few more than that number. The most understood poems, and seemingly the very few that communicated purpose and meaning to me, happen to include the three or four that other reviewers list as their favorites, and I suppose they were mine also. Beyond those, Frost's work leaves me wondering why all the fuss. My apologies to the throng of "Frost Lovers" eve Perhaps I am just not a poetry guy. I enjoyed very few of this collection. I liked only slightly more than that, and actually understood only a few more than that number. The most understood poems, and seemingly the very few that communicated purpose and meaning to me, happen to include the three or four that other reviewers list as their favorites, and I suppose they were mine also. Beyond those, Frost's work leaves me wondering why all the fuss. My apologies to the throng of "Frost Lovers" everywhere.

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